News

This news story was originally published here: http://theprogressiveaspect.net/blog/2019/10/20/esp-project-the-rising/

“Above the towers of prayer and hope
Polishing their Poundshop halos by the score
They’ve never seen the ground below
Whispering their fallacies behind closed doors.”

(A Million Heartbeats)

Some lyrics instinctively catch your attention; they have a unique and provocative ability to capture a mood, a feeling, a sentiment with a clarity and a focus which instantly conveys the meaning of what is being communicated. The searching lyrics woven in and through the ESP Project’s magnificent third studio album, The Rising, carry a beguiling beauty and an incisive gravitas which elevate this release into the realms of something special.

Damien Child possesses that uncanny ability to blend the alluring artistry of poetry with clear-sighted insights drawn from noticing episodes of the life we live and the state of the world in which we live.

“We are dandelion seeds
Floating on the winds of
Space and time
Passing through,
The parallel lines
Dispersing blindly
Through hydrogen skies.”

(The Rising)

The tranquil elegance of the observations are perfectly aligned with the penetrating vision we are being offered. Struggling in all the ways we can to make it through each day:

“I’m drawing lines around my ego
Doing all I can to face a better day
A fleeting carnival
An echo of a spark
For one, glorious life
Each moment is where we belong.”

(On Lunar Tides)

The entire album is infused, inspired and, indeed, animated by the playfulness of the language being used and the possibilities it opens for us to experience delicate moments of discernment and appreciation.

Lyrics alone, however, are nothing without a matching musical canvas against which they can spread and find expression. Tony Lowe’s songwriting is utterly intoxicating. Delightful soundscapes are entwined around sophisticated, carefully crafted structures. Alluring melodies echo across intense, shifting rhythms; gorgeous harmonic layers segue through wonderfully elegant shifts of mood and intensely creative changes of atmosphere. The sheer scale and extent of the musical vision is mesmerising.

On Lunar Tides is a dazzling example of what this album does best. The longest track at over ten minutes, the combination of changes, not just in rhythms and tempo but also in the shifting prominence given to the different instruments involved, contrasted with vocals which permeate each transition create a spell-binding ebb and flow to the musical experience.

The languid, teasing guitar and haunting vocal which open Stranger In My Skin has a chilled, dreamy mood before transforming into an upbeat chorus and refrain, sounding a note of temporary alarm and urgency before sinking back to the calmness of the original beat and a fantastic guitar solo which gently lifts and carries you along. Yet the urgency returns, this time transforming into a fast-paced, pressing rhythm building to a tingling crescendo.

In all of this, Greg Pringle’s drumming brings a seemingly effortless vitality and dynamism. The opening salvo of the title track is a disciplined injection of driving pace and sustained attack. This is mirrored in the glorious Flowers In The Snow; an upbeat burst of momentum drives the song forward until a natural entropy changes the velocity of the music to a more gentle, calmer beat. New World Disorder is a veritable clinic in the range of tones and textures it is possible to achieve with a drum kit. Formidable.

If you get the chance to isolate the basslines, Pete Clark provides something of a masterclass in the art of skilful and ingenious bass playing. The Rising in part isolates the bass for you, opening a window which lets you focus on a fabulous, pulsating bassline which underpins the entire track. A Million Heartbeats carries the same spirit and enthusiasm but this time yields to a more relaxed, refined and deft contribution. Once you hear and become aware of what he’s up to, listening to the subtlety and nuance he brings to each song adds a different character and dimension.

By the time we reach the end, music and lyrics blend as one in a glorious upsurge of hope and optimism: “Trust your heart / A new day is coming / Trust your heart”. The brilliant thing is, such is the depth of the emotion and the musical excitement of the journey we have been on, you believe it – whole-heartedly. “A million heartbeats turn a tide” leaves us with something to which we can aspire and a confidence that this is no wishful thinking.

This is an album brimming with invention and imagination, where exceptional instrumental artistry embraces a rich lyrical poetry to create tantalising musical sketches to surprise and delight in equal measure. Highly recommended.

TRACK LISTING
01. The Rising (9:17)
02. Connected (5:44)
03. On Lunar Tides (10:49)
04. Flowers in Snow (6:41)
05. Stranger in my Skin (7:36)
06. New World Disorder (6:50)
07. A Million Heartbeats (6:40)

Total Time – 53:41

MUSICIANS
Damien Child – Vocals
Pete Clark – Bass
Tony Lowe – Guitars, Keyboards
Greg Pringle – Drums

ADDITIONAL INFO
Label: Sunn Creative
Format: CD, Digital
Country of Origin: U.K.
Date of Release: 11th October 2019

LINKS
ESP Project – Website | Facebook | Instagram | Twitter | Bandcamp

This news story was originally published here: http://theprogressiveaspect.net/blog/2019/10/19/richard-henshall-the-cocoon/

I’ll admit to having an interesting relationship with Haken, having absolutely loved their ’80s inspired album Affinity, whilst I felt Vector was a bit of a step backwards for them, so having heard Richard Henshall, a mainstay of the band, was releasing a solo album, I was unsure as to what to expect.

This is Henshall’s debut solo album, and I was hoping it would be more akin to Guy Garvey’s solo album in relation to his work with Elbow, rather than Ian Anderson who just keeps releasing Jethro Tull albums in all but name.

Surrounding himself with a talented core cast of Haken bassist Connor Green and Nova Collective and Cynic drummer Matthew Lynch, The Cocoon was recorded over a 4-year period and features Henshall’s debut performance as a lead vocalist, and he’s got a hefty list of collaborators, including Ben and Jessica from Bent Knee on vocals and Jordan Rudess.

What makes this cohesive as a solo album is the fact that all seven tracks were recorded with the key power trio, so instead of having a revolving list of musicians, and there being a lack of vision or ‘togetherness’, the fact that Henshall and Green already have that musical partnership which works so well almost shortcuts the period of allowing collaborators to bed in, and Lynch fits in perfectly, his powerfull drumming working beautifully.

When it started (and I’ll be honest, I hadn’t read any of the background about it) I was expecting an instrumental album, and one that sounded like Haken, so I was pleasantly surprised to hear vocals, and yes, this is a Richard Henshall album so there’s plenty of his trademark guitar shredding going down. However, and again I was pleasantly surprised, as the album got going and started to build, that it is, whilst due to Richard’s distinctive playing style, reminiscent in parts of Haken, it is not a Haken album in all but name, and that’s what drew me in, the fact that there is more going on here than I expected. It sees Henshall pushing himself musically and creatively, and opens with Pupa, with its twisty riffs and combined keyboard soloing sounding the most Haken-like piece on the album, and I guess if it’s designed to ease us in gently then it works.

The next one is the title track Cocoon, an epic which if it had been on Vector would have made it a far better album, but that’s an aside, the work of Henshall and his trio make it sound far bigger than the work of three men, and some sublime keyboard/guitar work builds together nicely to create a piece that culminates in a crescendo with some suitably heavy riffing and then a rather funky solo.

Taking lead vocals doesn’t seem to be too much of a problem for Henshall, whose vocal tone is perfect for the work here, softer than would have been anticipated, and it means that Cocoon is a nicely structured, well-made piece of prog metal, and whilst I am not the biggest fan of that genre, this really took me by surprise as to how melodic it is, the guitar work enhancing rather than distracting from that melody.

As ever, there is a lot going on, but Henshall has the musical chops to pull it off and make it work confidently. The other tracks are all pretty epic, which allows the band a lot of time and space to grow and build these magnificent beasts.

Of particular interest is the Henshall/Ben Leven collaboration, Lunar Room, with Leven’s vocals more spoken word and a harder musical undercurrent, it is a real departure for the sound of the album. With additional vocals from Ben’s Bent Knee colleague Jessica Kion, this is one of the most interesting pieces on the album, Henshall stepping into totally different territory, and the mix of Ben and Jessica’s vocals, the trio’s powerful playful performance, some incredibly choppy keyboards and free-form sounds, makes it a real musical treat.

The alternative to that is the follow up Twisted Shadows, which starts off in far more traditional form with some lovely guitar/keys interplay and some wonderful Henshall riffing, before the mood twists into something more funky and grooveful. The band lay down some nice fat beats, with the bass and drums hitting a smooth rhythm, and then along comes Jordan Rudess with a superb jazzy/fusion keyboard vibe that really pulls things together. The mix of fusion jazz, traditional prog sounds and Henshall’s shredding shouldn’t work, but it really does and makes for a wonderfully vibrant sound.

Afterglow with its soft acoustic, almost folk-tinged riff, slowly builds and builds into this immense and anthemic piece of haunting beauty, reminiscent to these ears of the longer musical soundscapes created by bands like Explosions in the Sky, with some beautifully haunting strings arranged by Cris Baum, and rounding the album off in style.

Going back to my original point about being a bit ambivalent about Haken, and believe me I love them live, just sometimes it doesn’t quite hit the spot on CD. I was a tad reluctant to review this album, as Haken are probably as heavy as I would tend to get in the whole prog metal genre, and it’s a bit out of my comfort zone, albums like this. Which is why I am glad I have listened to this and reviewed it. It’s an exciting, eclectic and intelligent record that is full of ‘Wow’ moments and none of the over-complex, noodly for the sake of it sounds that sometimes creep out of this genre.

Henshall is a master of his craft, and this is a fantastic debut that showcases his talents and abilities to the fore. I highly recommend this one.

TRACK LISTING
01. Pupa (2:26)
02. Cocoon (10:26)
03. Silent Chains (8:10)
04. Limbo (3:54)
05. Lunar Room (8:21)
06. Twisted Shadows (8:46)
07. Afterglow (5:16)

Total Time – 47:19

MUSICIANS
Matt Lynch – Drums
Conner Green – Bass
Richard Henshall – Guitars, Keyboards, Vocals
~ With:
Ben Levin – Vocals (on Lunar Room)
Jessica Kion – Vocals (on Lunar Room)
Ross Jennings – Vocals (on Twisted Shadows)
Jordan Rudess – Keyboard Solo (on Twisted Shadows)
Marco Sfogli – Guitar Solo (on Lunar Room)
David Maxim Micic – Guitar Solo (on Silken Chains)
Cris Baum – Strings (on Afterglow)
Adam Carrillo – Saxophone (on Cocoon)

ADDITIONAL INFO
Record Label: Independent
Catalogue#: RHCD1
Country of Origin: U.K.
Date of Release: 9th August 2019

LINKS
Richard Henshall – Website | Facebook | Bandcamp

This news story was originally published here: http://www.prog-sphere.com/interviews/within-progress-interview/

Thessaloniki, Greece based progressive rock/metal quintet Within Progress was formed in 2017. The band recorded their debut EP ‘Oceans of Time‘ same year, and released it in April 2018. While the group is currently working on songs for their upcoming full-length release, we featured a song from a debut EP on our latest Progotronics compilation, and as a result of that we talked with the band about their work.

Define the mission of Within Progress.

We are five very different people who came together from our love of music. We don’t “do” genres, we gather together to write music we love and want to hear, and we think that it has a potential for something unique, because of how different each one of our personality and mindset is. Our mission is to get that across to as many people as we can.

Tell me about the creative process that informed your debut EP “Oceans of Time” and the themes it captures.

“Oceans of Time” is the collection of the best songs we ever tried to write together as a band. The basis of all songs was written by only two of current members and an ex-guitarist who would get together 1-2 times per week and see what kind of music they could compose together. Since the current line-up was completed very shortly before we started recording, many things were re-written during the sessions. Music always came before lyrics and it’s almost always like that for us as we are more expressive with music than with lyrics. We also didn’t have a singer during the majority of the time that the songs were being written so what you hear on the EP are mainly guitar/riff driven compositions with vocals placed on top as efficiently as we could. It was the first serious songwriting attempt for all us and we think we got a very stellar result.

The themes that “Oceans of Time” captures are mainly based on negative aspects of modern day society, with a slight emphasis on certain human behaviors and patterns, and how those cause hostility and alienation in our relationships. For example, we question the beliefs of parents that are passed on to their children at an age when they haven’t developed their own free will or how sometimes we would rather appear knowledgeable to impress our peers than admitting that we in fact know very little of that certain subject.

What is the message you are trying to give with “Oceans of Time”?

It’s always more controversial when someone speaks about the negative side of things and provokes people and lyrically we wanted to do just that. To make people aware of these situations, acknowledge that they’re there, they’re real and they affect our daily lives, and try to better ourselves and our relationships with each other in spite of them.

Musically, “Oceans of Time” is a kind of “we’re here” statement. We wanted to introduce ourselves to the scene with just a small taste before we set on to release more ambitious things.

How did you document the music while it was being formulated?

We would always write everything on software and orchestrate the songs from the computer first before we played them live in the studio. There’s an upside and a downside in doing this. We chose to work in this manner because of the nature of progressive music. For example, you can’t go in the studio and suddenly jam syncopated riffs in odd time signatures from scratch. You have to actually see everything written down on paper or on screen. So each new idea was first written on sheet music on the computer and we worked our way up from there. Usually the guitar was the driving force of the songs except for the song “Oceans of Time” in which the drums were written first.

The downside of our approach to songwriting is that the music isn’t as spontaneous as it could be if it was written while rehearsing. We try to balance the two approaches when we write music now.

Oceans of Time

Is the dynamic flow of the pieces carefully architected?

The fact that the pieces are carefully architected is a bit of an understatement (haha), and we don’t mean that in a pretentious way. The songs are most definitely not perfect but we’re not the kind of band that writes a song in a few hours and calls it a day. The basic structure of the song could be written in a short amount of time but it takes weeks before we’re happy with the end result. We always ask ourselves “How could this part be better?” or “Is this section really as good as it can be?”. For “Oceans of Time”, many sections were re-arranged and re-written, parts were erased or added, even during the recording sessions, while always serving the song.

Describe the approach to recording the EP.

We recorded the EP in Fireball Music Studio in Thessaloniki. We had already decided which 5 songs we would include in the album. Before recording we listened to the songs with the producer from demos we had made ourselves and some others in MIDI form. He offered some suggestions for the songs themselves and for how we would approach recording.

Drums & percussion were recorded first in 3 days followed by guitars, bass and piano/synths. Because of the two bassists that came before our current one, the bass parts were the ones that suffered the most alterations during the process as they did not fit well with the drums so many things were changed on the spot. Finally vocals came last and took the longest. Our singer actually recorded the entire album in a day but decided to erase the whole thing and redo everything as he wasn’t happy with the result. During recording, at least two band members were present to offer suggestions and help so no one actually recorded alone. Our producer helped us hugely in both the compositional side of things as well as the recording process itself and we took his advice when we thought that it improved the song. That was the case in many different occasions. It was the first official recording session for all of us during which we discovered how different the studio is from a live setting but we also grasped our capabilities as musicians in our own respective instruments.

How long was “Oceans of Time” in the making?

The songs were written in a year although some ideas existed long before. The recording sessions for drums, guitars took place in July 2017 while bass, piano/synths and vocals went on during the autumn of 2017. The album was mixed and mastered by Joe FK by February 2018 and the first song was released in March with the entire album release in April 2018. In general, the entire album was almost a year and a half in the making, from the songwriting to the mastering stage.

Which bands or artists influenced your work on the release?

The songs were being written while the main songwriters of the band were out of their heavy metal phase and into discovering more and more progressive bands. So you can expect the “classic” Tool, Dream Theater, Porcupine Tree influence on the music as well as more modern examples like Tesseract, Leprous, Mastodon & Gojira and also Hans Zimmer on the track “Celestial Notion”. A lot of our guitar work was actually inspired by Greek traditional music where odd time signatures and a lot of “eastern” sounding melodies are commonplace. That theme is actually very upfront on the record and many people have noticed it.

What is your view on technology in music?

We live in an age where you can take basically any sound and manipulate or process it in any way you see fit. With that fact alone, the sky is the limit when it comes to making music which to us is unbelievably fascinating. We’re big fans of using effects or plugins, reversed sounds and processed audio in an unconventional way just to see what sound they make and how that can be used musically. All that is now at your fingertips, at a click of a button and with basic computer knowledge, anyone can try it. Also, thanks to technology anyone can record and produce music even with a very low budget which also means that there is more music being released today than ever before. It really is exhausting to think how much music is out there and so much of it is really good!

There’s absolutely no way that you won’t find something to your liking.
That being said, it is so easy to use technology nowadays to edit your playing and alter your sound into something that you haven’t thought about how you’ll play or recreate live. That to us is a big mistake as you can easily reassure yourself that you’ll fix it in the editing stage or in the mix when you actually haven’t played the part as well as you could. It is fun to use technology to our advantage but let’s not forget that we’re people who play music live.

Within Progress live

Do you see your music as serving a purpose beyond music?

Of course we do. Music is for so much more than just listening. It makes you feel things that no other medium can make you feel. It’s raw and pure emotion and it can be cathartic. When you haven’t had the best day, a small piece of lyric behind beautiful harmony can change that. When you’re happy, a happy song can amplify your feelings. It can simply get you in the right frame of mind when you want to accomplish goals. Music (as well as film) is one of the most powerful ways to deliver a message or story and (cliché aside) it really does bring people together because it is culturally universal, whether it is a 20-minute long progressive metal symphony or a 3 minute pop song.

What are your plans for the future?

We are currently writing songs for our first full-length album and there are a lot of exciting and new ideas! So many that some will have to go to the 2nd album or later releases. It is the first time the entire current line-up is in the same room composing music from scratch together so the result will be quite different from “Oceans of Time”. We’re also thinking about how we will release our LP and so far we have just been brainstorming ideas. When it comes to gigs, we have put that on hold right now as finishing our album is priority number one and we want it to be as good as it possibly can. However we’re always on the lookout for live shows that can get us exposure to more people (so far in Greece).

Thank you for having us and for the very nice questions!

Oceans of Time is available from Bandcamp here. Follow Within Progress on Facebook and Instagram.

The post WITHIN PROGRESS: Different Mindsets appeared first on Prog Sphere.

This news story was originally published here: https://www.prog-sphere.com/interviews/within-progress-interview/

Thessaloniki, Greece based progressive rock/metal quintet Within Progress was formed in 2017. The band recorded their debut EP ‘Oceans of Time‘ same year, and released it in April 2018. While the group is currently working on songs for their upcoming full-length release, we featured a song from a debut EP on our latest Progotronics compilation, and as a result of that we talked with the band about their work.

Define the mission of Within Progress.

We are five very different people who came together from our love of music. We don’t “do” genres, we gather together to write music we love and want to hear, and we think that it has a potential for something unique, because of how different each one of our personality and mindset is. Our mission is to get that across to as many people as we can.

Tell me about the creative process that informed your debut EP “Oceans of Time” and the themes it captures.

“Oceans of Time” is the collection of the best songs we ever tried to write together as a band. The basis of all songs was written by only two of current members and an ex-guitarist who would get together 1-2 times per week and see what kind of music they could compose together. Since the current line-up was completed very shortly before we started recording, many things were re-written during the sessions. Music always came before lyrics and it’s almost always like that for us as we are more expressive with music than with lyrics. We also didn’t have a singer during the majority of the time that the songs were being written so what you hear on the EP are mainly guitar/riff driven compositions with vocals placed on top as efficiently as we could. It was the first serious songwriting attempt for all us and we think we got a very stellar result.

The themes that “Oceans of Time” captures are mainly based on negative aspects of modern day society, with a slight emphasis on certain human behaviors and patterns, and how those cause hostility and alienation in our relationships. For example, we question the beliefs of parents that are passed on to their children at an age when they haven’t developed their own free will or how sometimes we would rather appear knowledgeable to impress our peers than admitting that we in fact know very little of that certain subject.

What is the message you are trying to give with “Oceans of Time”?

It’s always more controversial when someone speaks about the negative side of things and provokes people and lyrically we wanted to do just that. To make people aware of these situations, acknowledge that they’re there, they’re real and they affect our daily lives, and try to better ourselves and our relationships with each other in spite of them.

Musically, “Oceans of Time” is a kind of “we’re here” statement. We wanted to introduce ourselves to the scene with just a small taste before we set on to release more ambitious things.

How did you document the music while it was being formulated?

We would always write everything on software and orchestrate the songs from the computer first before we played them live in the studio. There’s an upside and a downside in doing this. We chose to work in this manner because of the nature of progressive music. For example, you can’t go in the studio and suddenly jam syncopated riffs in odd time signatures from scratch. You have to actually see everything written down on paper or on screen. So each new idea was first written on sheet music on the computer and we worked our way up from there. Usually the guitar was the driving force of the songs except for the song “Oceans of Time” in which the drums were written first.

The downside of our approach to songwriting is that the music isn’t as spontaneous as it could be if it was written while rehearsing. We try to balance the two approaches when we write music now.

Oceans of Time

Is the dynamic flow of the pieces carefully architected?

The fact that the pieces are carefully architected is a bit of an understatement (haha), and we don’t mean that in a pretentious way. The songs are most definitely not perfect but we’re not the kind of band that writes a song in a few hours and calls it a day. The basic structure of the song could be written in a short amount of time but it takes weeks before we’re happy with the end result. We always ask ourselves “How could this part be better?” or “Is this section really as good as it can be?”. For “Oceans of Time”, many sections were re-arranged and re-written, parts were erased or added, even during the recording sessions, while always serving the song.

Describe the approach to recording the EP.

We recorded the EP in Fireball Music Studio in Thessaloniki. We had already decided which 5 songs we would include in the album. Before recording we listened to the songs with the producer from demos we had made ourselves and some others in MIDI form. He offered some suggestions for the songs themselves and for how we would approach recording.

Drums & percussion were recorded first in 3 days followed by guitars, bass and piano/synths. Because of the two bassists that came before our current one, the bass parts were the ones that suffered the most alterations during the process as they did not fit well with the drums so many things were changed on the spot. Finally vocals came last and took the longest. Our singer actually recorded the entire album in a day but decided to erase the whole thing and redo everything as he wasn’t happy with the result. During recording, at least two band members were present to offer suggestions and help so no one actually recorded alone. Our producer helped us hugely in both the compositional side of things as well as the recording process itself and we took his advice when we thought that it improved the song. That was the case in many different occasions. It was the first official recording session for all of us during which we discovered how different the studio is from a live setting but we also grasped our capabilities as musicians in our own respective instruments.

How long was “Oceans of Time” in the making?

The songs were written in a year although some ideas existed long before. The recording sessions for drums, guitars took place in July 2017 while bass, piano/synths and vocals went on during the autumn of 2017. The album was mixed and mastered by Joe FK by February 2018 and the first song was released in March with the entire album release in April 2018. In general, the entire album was almost a year and a half in the making, from the songwriting to the mastering stage.

Which bands or artists influenced your work on the release?

The songs were being written while the main songwriters of the band were out of their heavy metal phase and into discovering more and more progressive bands. So you can expect the “classic” Tool, Dream Theater, Porcupine Tree influence on the music as well as more modern examples like Tesseract, Leprous, Mastodon & Gojira and also Hans Zimmer on the track “Celestial Notion”. A lot of our guitar work was actually inspired by Greek traditional music where odd time signatures and a lot of “eastern” sounding melodies are commonplace. That theme is actually very upfront on the record and many people have noticed it.

What is your view on technology in music?

We live in an age where you can take basically any sound and manipulate or process it in any way you see fit. With that fact alone, the sky is the limit when it comes to making music which to us is unbelievably fascinating. We’re big fans of using effects or plugins, reversed sounds and processed audio in an unconventional way just to see what sound they make and how that can be used musically. All that is now at your fingertips, at a click of a button and with basic computer knowledge, anyone can try it. Also, thanks to technology anyone can record and produce music even with a very low budget which also means that there is more music being released today than ever before. It really is exhausting to think how much music is out there and so much of it is really good!

There’s absolutely no way that you won’t find something to your liking.
That being said, it is so easy to use technology nowadays to edit your playing and alter your sound into something that you haven’t thought about how you’ll play or recreate live. That to us is a big mistake as you can easily reassure yourself that you’ll fix it in the editing stage or in the mix when you actually haven’t played the part as well as you could. It is fun to use technology to our advantage but let’s not forget that we’re people who play music live.

Within Progress live

Do you see your music as serving a purpose beyond music?

Of course we do. Music is for so much more than just listening. It makes you feel things that no other medium can make you feel. It’s raw and pure emotion and it can be cathartic. When you haven’t had the best day, a small piece of lyric behind beautiful harmony can change that. When you’re happy, a happy song can amplify your feelings. It can simply get you in the right frame of mind when you want to accomplish goals. Music (as well as film) is one of the most powerful ways to deliver a message or story and (cliché aside) it really does bring people together because it is culturally universal, whether it is a 20-minute long progressive metal symphony or a 3 minute pop song.

What are your plans for the future?

We are currently writing songs for our first full-length album and there are a lot of exciting and new ideas! So many that some will have to go to the 2nd album or later releases. It is the first time the entire current line-up is in the same room composing music from scratch together so the result will be quite different from “Oceans of Time”. We’re also thinking about how we will release our LP and so far we have just been brainstorming ideas. When it comes to gigs, we have put that on hold right now as finishing our album is priority number one and we want it to be as good as it possibly can. However we’re always on the lookout for live shows that can get us exposure to more people (so far in Greece).

Thank you for having us and for the very nice questions!

Oceans of Time is available from Bandcamp here. Follow Within Progress on Facebook and Instagram.

The post WITHIN PROGRESS: Different Mindsets appeared first on Prog Sphere.

This news story was originally published here: https://www.prog-sphere.com/interviews/atomic-shadows-interview/

Serbian metal four-piece Atomic Shadows are set to launch their full-length debut album entitled ‘Red’ later this year. The band has recently premiered a first single off of the album for the song “Hiraeth” which was a part of the Progotronics 15 sampler. Singer Dragisa Beric spoke for Prog Sphere.

Define the mission of Atomic Shadows.

Well our mission is to make the music that we enjoy playing and evolve over time, not losing the fun in the process. We hope to do this for a long time and experiment, trying not to be confined by any particular genre, and aim to make every new album different and exciting.

The first single titled “Hiraeth” from your upcoming album was a part of our recent Progotronics compilation. What can you tell me about the upcoming release, and how does “Hiraeth” fit into it?

Yes and we are very happy to be the part of your 15th Progotronics compilation. Our upcoming album will be the part of trilogy, so the next 3 albums are going to be connected with color themes as expression of emotions. So we will take this opportunity to announce the name of the first album, and it will be called “Red”. Red is stimulating and exciting colour and depending of the shades of red it can range from anger, wrath to heat, longing, lust and so on. So Hiraeth is more in a range of lust and longing emotionally.

Tell me about the creative process that informed your upcoming album and the themes it captures.

In the beginning we just started working on new songs, and as we’ve progressed the material started unfolding into a theme, for which the idea for trilogy album came out. Inspiration and work ethic are working well for us, because by just playing the ideas emerge spontaneously.

What is the message you are trying to give with “Hiraeth”?

We’re not really trying to give any particular message with this song. Hiraeth is concepted so that the listener can interpret and connect in his own way with the song, as most of our songs. As we’ve said before, this song is lyrically and musically in a range of lust and longing emotion, like the title of the song says. The word cannot be completely translated, meaning more than just “missing something”.

How did you document the music while it was being formulated?

We record every rehearsal and listen to it later. For us this is the very important step, because it drives new ideas while listening. Also because the lyrics usually come after the music is done, it allows us to feel the emotion of the music, and blend the lyrics theme easier with the music.

Describe the approach to recording the album.

By the time we are ready to enter the studio, we have a general view on how the songs should sound like. However, we always leave some room for creative process to happen in the studio as well. We don’t try to control the things to much, because that’s the right way to let the magic happen. Also our producer Milos Mihajlovic is very helpful in this process by trying to make the most out of each take.

Which bands or artists influenced your work on the release?

Well we can name the bands that influenced us generally, like from Led Zeppelin, The Stooges, Joy Division, to Faith No More, Tool,Porcupine Tree, Deftones, Pantera, Down, Soundgarden, Alice in Chains, The Melvins, Fugazi, Sonic Youth, Prodigy, Black Flag, My Bloody Valentine etc.. However we can’t point out to any specific genre or bands that influenced this release, because it’s a blend of a lot of different influences.

What is your view on technology in music?

When used the right way the technology can be very well utilized . The most important thing is that it doesn’t sound too sterile, it needs to keep the natural sound and capture emotion in the right way.

Do you see your music as serving a purpose beyond music?

Depends on the perception of what could be beyond music. We are acting out all the possible emotions playing as well as listening to music, and it is definitely a big part of our lives.

What are your plans for the future?

Our plans are to release this album in the very near future, the songs are done and we’re just doing mixes right now. To present it in the best way that we can, by doing gigs and releasing more music videos. Also we are already doing some new songs.

The post ATOMIC SHADOWS: Spontaneous Ideas appeared first on Prog Sphere.

This news story was originally published here: http://www.prog-sphere.com/interviews/atomic-shadows-interview/

Serbian metal four-piece Atomic Shadows are set to launch their full-length debut album entitled ‘Red’ later this year. The band has recently premiered a first single off of the album for the song “Hiraeth” which was a part of the Progotronics 15 sampler. Singer Dragisa Beric spoke for Prog Sphere.

Define the mission of Atomic Shadows.

Well our mission is to make the music that we enjoy playing and evolve over time, not losing the fun in the process. We hope to do this for a long time and experiment, trying not to be confined by any particular genre, and aim to make every new album different and exciting.

The first single titled “Hiraeth” from your upcoming album was a part of our recent Progotronics compilation. What can you tell me about the upcoming release, and how does “Hiraeth” fit into it?

Yes and we are very happy to be the part of your 15th Progotronics compilation. Our upcoming album will be the part of trilogy, so the next 3 albums are going to be connected with color themes as expression of emotions. So we will take this opportunity to announce the name of the first album, and it will be called “Red”. Red is stimulating and exciting colour and depending of the shades of red it can range from anger, wrath to heat, longing, lust and so on. So Hiraeth is more in a range of lust and longing emotionally.

Tell me about the creative process that informed your upcoming album and the themes it captures.

In the beginning we just started working on new songs, and as we’ve progressed the material started unfolding into a theme, for which the idea for trilogy album came out. Inspiration and work ethic are working well for us, because by just playing the ideas emerge spontaneously.

What is the message you are trying to give with “Hiraeth”?

We’re not really trying to give any particular message with this song. Hiraeth is concepted so that the listener can interpret and connect in his own way with the song, as most of our songs. As we’ve said before, this song is lyrically and musically in a range of lust and longing emotion, like the title of the song says. The word cannot be completely translated, meaning more than just “missing something”.

How did you document the music while it was being formulated?

We record every rehearsal and listen to it later. For us this is the very important step, because it drives new ideas while listening. Also because the lyrics usually come after the music is done, it allows us to feel the emotion of the music, and blend the lyrics theme easier with the music.

Describe the approach to recording the album.

By the time we are ready to enter the studio, we have a general view on how the songs should sound like. However, we always leave some room for creative process to happen in the studio as well. We don’t try to control the things to much, because that’s the right way to let the magic happen. Also our producer Milos Mihajlovic is very helpful in this process by trying to make the most out of each take.

Which bands or artists influenced your work on the release?

Well we can name the bands that influenced us generally, like from Led Zeppelin, The Stooges, Joy Division, to Faith No More, Tool,Porcupine Tree, Deftones, Pantera, Down, Soundgarden, Alice in Chains, The Melvins, Fugazi, Sonic Youth, Prodigy, Black Flag, My Bloody Valentine etc.. However we can’t point out to any specific genre or bands that influenced this release, because it’s a blend of a lot of different influences.

What is your view on technology in music?

When used the right way the technology can be very well utilized . The most important thing is that it doesn’t sound too sterile, it needs to keep the natural sound and capture emotion in the right way.

Do you see your music as serving a purpose beyond music?

Depends on the perception of what could be beyond music. We are acting out all the possible emotions playing as well as listening to music, and it is definitely a big part of our lives.

What are your plans for the future?

Our plans are to release this album in the very near future, the songs are done and we’re just doing mixes right now. To present it in the best way that we can, by doing gigs and releasing more music videos. Also we are already doing some new songs.

The post ATOMIC SHADOWS: Spontaneous Ideas appeared first on Prog Sphere.

This news story was originally published here: http://theprogressiveaspect.net/blog/2019/10/18/king-gizzard-the-lizard-wizard/

O2 Victoria Warehouse, Manchester
Thursday, 3rd October 2019

Having taken a well-earned rest from releasing anything in 2018, King Gizzard & The Lizard Wizard are back with two shiny new records to show the world.

It’s somewhat of a quieter year compared to the five albums fans were treated to in 2017, but who knows, maybe less can be more? And, with a band infamous for their unique live shows, the true test of these albums comes on the road. As their world tour rolls on, a stop at Manchester’s O2 Victoria Warehouse seemed a perfect setting for an evening of psychedelic rock.

2019’s Infest the Rats’ Nest contains some of the bands most feral material to date, with an unexpected exploration into thrash metal. We’re a long way from the much softer psychedelia they were known for half a decade ago. This might be a bit much for some listeners, but you cannot deny the energy of these tracks live. King Gizzard held nothing back with opening song Self-Immolate leading straight into Perihelion. Both drummers Michael Cavanagh and Eric Moore maintained an intense pace, completely in sync, providing a strong backing for such intense tracks.

King Gizzard & the Lizard Wizard 3

The album Fishing For Fishies, also released this year, feels much more like business as usual for the band. With roots clearly in classic psychedelic rock, it’s an enjoyable listen, if a tad clichéd. Ambrose Kenny-Smith’s harmonica playing was a real treat on the live renditions. Feeling straight out of the seventies, I’d happily welcome this trope back into the modern-day.

Plastic Boogie proved to be the strongest live offering from this album. The riffs stay true to the track’s “boogie” namesake, getting the crowd moving, though this very much seems ironic when compared to the song’s lyrics, centred on the damage plastic causes to the environment. Although their point may be too on the nose with lines, “Fuck all of that plastic” and “The way we wrap it is wrong”, they remain memorable. And, considering how often people ignore these issues, the message may need to be stated that obviously.

The thematically similar track Planet B was even more blatant. The theme is where the similarity ends, however. The four minutes of shredding and screaming sums up about how anxious I am about the current climate crisis. Again, simply put across, the lyric “There is no planet B” effectively conveys their point.

King Gizzard & the Lizard Wizard 4

Leading into another track from Infest The Rats’ Nest, Hell maintained that ferocity. At this point, the crowd were whipped up into a frenzy, the perfect time to deliver material from Nonagon Infinity. The 2016 noise rock album might even be their strongest, which is quite the title among fourteen records. The pairing of Wah Wah flowing seamlessly into Road Train certainly stood out as a highlight in the set.

Ten-minute track The River felt like an odd follow-on. One of four parts from Quarters, it had the feel of a psychedelic jam session, even jazzy at times. Definitely not without merit, but a deflating end to the set. The previous four tracks built up so much energy to a climax that never arrived. Not even an encore. The feeling amongst the audience was just confusion… not the impression you want to leave. With scores of fans chanting for Rattlesnake, the band could have ended on a high by indulging them in any one of their classics.

An overall strong performance from King Gizzard, but at this point, more can be expected of them. Fundamentally, the show was flawed by older stronger material making way for their latest albums. Definitely not weak tracks, but not up to scratch with the burst of creativity they had in 2017. However, King Gizzard & The Lizard Wizard simply do whatever the hell they want. This is the attitude that led to their variety of music and ultimately their success. They are always going to be a band worth seeing.

King Gizzard & the Lizard Wizard 5

[All photos by Leo Trimming.]

SETLIST
Self-Immolate
Perihelion
Plastic Boogie
The Great Chain of Being
This Thing
Down the Sink
Let me Mend the Past
Cut-Throat Boogie
The Cruel Millenial
Alter Me III
Altered Beast IV
Cyboogie
Inner Cell
Loyalty
Horology
Planet B
Hell
Wah Wah
Road Train
The River

MUSICIANS
Stu Mackenzie – Vocals, Guitar, Bass, Keyboards, Flute
Ambrose Kenny-Smith – Vocals, Harmonica, Keyboards
Cook Craig – Guitar, Bass, Vocals
Joey Walker – Guitar, Bass, Keyboards, Vocals
Lucas Skinner – Bass, Keyboards
Michael Cavanagh – Drums, Percussion
Eric Moore – Drums, Percussion

LINKS
King Gizzard & The Lizard Wizard – Website | Facebook | Bandcamp | Twitter

This news story was originally published here: http://theprogressiveaspect.net/blog/2019/10/17/progdreams-viii-day-3/

De Boerderij, Zoetermeer, NL
Sunday, 22nd September 2019

It’s safe to say that De Boerderij in Zoetermeer is the number one prog stage in the Netherlands. The theatre has already been voted runner up several times in the favourite prog venues poll by PROG magazine, just behind the Royal Albert Hall. To illustrate this, the Progdreams festival was organized for the eighth time in succession this year. Once again, the poster was littered with interesting names such as Sky Architect, The Paradox Twin and Von Hertzen Brothers on Friday and The Dame, IT, Verbal Delirium, IO Earth and Gazpacho on Saturday. Unfortunately, due to circumstances, I was unable to attend the entire event, but Sunday did fit in with my personal program, and I was certainly not disappointed by what was on offer on this final day.


Franck Carducci

Franck Carducci & Mary ReynaudThe Franck Carducci band guarantees a spectacular, theatrical show, and the knowledgeable prog fan knows what to expect. Despite the fact that the band has to play at a difficult time, as first of four bands on a Sunday afternoon around 3pm, the atmosphere is excellent right from the start. The band treats us to more than an hour of steaming prog rock, accompanied by a brilliant theatre show. Opener Slave to Rock ‘n’ Roll goes down really well with the audience, Carducci steals the show, as usual, together with Mary Reynaud. The latter plays a special role and fits in perfectly with her feather-light appearance. The fans watch and listen breathlessly as she, dressed in her angel costume, moves gracefully across the stage.

Franck CarducciThe medley should not be missed, kicking off with The Quind, the rest is one big feast for both eyes and ears. Not for the first time, a fully acoustic version of On the Road to Nowhere is performed, Franck on 12-string guitar, singing without a microphone, supported by the rest of the band, an absolute highlight. Alice’s Eerie Dream is Carducci’s version of Alice in Wonderland, with high theatrical content. As an encore, the band plays the well-known Artificial Paradise which blends seamlessly into a cover of Pink Floyd’s Eclipse. The sparkling show by these men plus lady is highly appreciated by the enthusiastic audience, as evidenced by the ecstatic applause, gratefully accepted by the group. Together with his band, Carducci will remain present all day, manning his merchandising booth himself, a particularly sympathetic and creative guy. It is about time for a break-through to larger audiences.

SET LIST
Slave To Rock ‘n’ Roll
The After Effect
Achilles
The Angel
The Quind / Journey Through The Mind / A Letter Tale Of Time / The Last Oddity
On The Road To Nowhere
Déjà Vu Airport
Alice’s Eerie Dream
~ Encore:
Artificial Paradises
Eclipse (Pink Floyd cover)
MUSICIANS
Christophe Obadia – Electric Guitar, Didgeridoo, Bass Pedals
Olivier Castan – Keyboards
Mary Reynaud – Theremin, Rainstick, Tambourine, Vocals
Nino Reina – Drums, Background Vocals
Franck Carducci – Bass Guitar, 12-String Guitar, Vocals

LINKS
Franck Carducci – Website | Facebook | Bandcamp


Brian Cummins plays Peter Gabriel

Brian CumminsBrian Cummins is best known as frontman/singer of tribute bands such as Carpet Crawlers and The ELO Show. Occasionally he makes a sidestep towards other prog artists, in his repertoire there is also a Peter Gabriel show which he performs as a solo artist. With this particular act he performed during Progdreams, and I’ll get straight to the point: it was a mediocre to weak performance by the sympathetic Englishman. Whether it was the fact that he had poorly prepared himself or that it was technically all too difficult, I really don’t know. The fact is that this was certainly not the best show that Brian Cummins has delivered at De Boerderij. In addition, the same old joke about PG’s Greatest Hits/Best Of and the fake conversation with non-present band members came across as somewhat pitiful. Having said that, he still has a good singing voice that comes close to the special sound of the original from time to time, especially during the acoustic pieces, such as Here Comes the Flood, the latter was clearly audible. Unfortunately for Cummins, the already not well-attended room was rendered half-empty over the course of his act. The crowd obviously preferred a snack or dinner to the show. Too bad, the Brit always puts a lot of effort into his performance with a high work ethic, but sadly he is failing somewhat in his Ed Sheeran act, with many effects and electronic gadgets. Shortening his usual set, and, in that context, the choice of repertoire did not really help either. Better luck next time.

SET LIST
Here Comes the Flood
Red Rain
Intruder
Talk To Me
Snapshot
Carpet Crawl
Mercy Street
San Jacinto
Biko
MUSICIANS
Brian Cummins – Guitars, Vocals, Sound Effects

LINKS
Brian Cummins – Facebook


John Hackett Band

Nick Fletcher - John Hackett BandPersonally, I had been looking forward to this performance of the John Hackett band. More specifically, the release of his latest album, Beyond The Stars from 2018 and his most proggy to date, sparked my interest. John Hackett, best known for his work with older brother Steve, kicks off at around 7pm for a performance that would last more than one and a half hours. Only about 100 people were present this Sunday, the closing day of the festival, a very modest number, which immediately raises the question whether this is sufficient for a follow-up event, but that question has been asked many times before and one way or another director Arie Verstegen and his staff always manage to present an interesting program to us, for which he deserves praise. However, some things have to be mentioned about the performance of the band. The harmony vocals were extremely mediocre and sometimes even out of tune. Hackett’s voice is unobtrusive and flat, neither fish nor fowl. The band is by no means a well-oiled machine yet, here and there the sound is still rattling. In their defence, it should be noted that the quartet rare performs live.

John HackettOn the other hand, there’s the performance of an absolute top guitarist named . Certainly not a youngster, on the contrary, but a relative ‘rookie’ when it comes to rock music. In recent decades Fletcher has mainly focused on the classical guitar, nevertheless, he was the star of the show with his play on the electric guitar, which is a cross between the late Allan Holdsworth, Dave Gilmour and Steve Hackett himself. In particular, the songs from the aforementioned most recent album did well. The beautiful King Crimson song I Talk To The Wind also met with lots of appreciation from the crowd. The encore Red Hair, an instrumental referring to the music of Jethro Tull, and the prog/jazz of Wind of Change were the highlights of the show. Oh yes, I almost forget the Peter Gabriel-like (Supper’s Ready!) introduction by drummer Duncan Parsons for the also instrumental Queenie and Elmo’s Perfect Day, hilarious. Could it be a coincidence that especially the instrumental songs came across best?

SET LIST
Spyglass
Whispers
Life In Reverse
Too Easy
Take Control
Burns Down Trees
Queenie And Elmo’s Perfect Day
Sign Of The times
Bamboo Flute
Wind Of Change
Who Let The Rain In
A Time In Place
I talk To The Wind (King Crimson cover)
Drone
A Horse Named Cadillac
~ Encore:
Magazine
Red Hair
MUSICIANS
John Hackett – Keyboards, Flute, Vocals
Jeremy Richardson – Bass, Vocals
Nick Fletcher – Guitar
Duncan Parsons – Drums, Background Vocals

LINKS
John Hackett Band – Website | Facebook


The Watch

Once upon a time, I was allowed to introduce this band on stage, somewhere in 2016 – my debut as a presenter. The Italians tour Europe extensively and visit De Boerderij almost every year, a ‘second home’ as Simone Rossetti mentioned during the performance. This time not a Genesis show, but mostly their own work with some well-chosen songs from their idols. Fortunately, because The Watch is much more than just another cover band, their own authentic material is just too good for that. Just listen to their most recent album Seven and you will be amazed by the musicality and craftsmanship of these musicians. A long soundcheck was needed, even with singer Rossetti overseeing proceedings from the middle of the hall, before the guys thought the sound was good enough to start. They finally did so around 9:20pm.

The Watch

I would like to highlight a few small gems from the setlist, such as opening track Hills/Damage Mode where the merger between Genesis and The Watch is most powerfully represented. And what about the authentic The Fisherman, which blends seamlessly into Apocalypse in 9/8 from Supper’s Ready (Gods of Magog), sublime. Rossetti’s traditional speech in Dutch is received with great applause. In addition, a special mention for the encore with own song New Normal and Genesis cover Firth of Fifth, John Hackett joins on flute on both songs.

The Watch

The show ends around 11 p.m. We have witnessed a great show from the Italians, as always passionate, focused and intense. The sound was excellent, the beautiful light show once again underlines the capabilities of the staff at De Boerderij in this field. An enthusiastic audience, now grown to around 150, could appreciate the combination of largely the band’s own authentic songs and work from the extensive oeuvre of legendary Genesis. It worked for me, another box ticked.

The Watch

A great finale to the eighth edition of the famous Progdreams Festival. Despite a relatively low turnout, once again a great success. Hopefully there are sufficient starting points for organizing a follow-up. The festival has now become a phenomenon and is an essential part of the (prog) concert listing. Let’s hope the management at De Boerderij feels the same way, at least they deserve tribute for their excellent initiative, on to the ninth edition!

SET LIST
Hills
Damage Mode
Goddess
Shining Bald Heads
Devil’s Bridge
Soaring On
Stagnation (Genesis cover)
DNAlien
The Fisherman
Supper’s Ready (Apocalypse in 9/8) (Genesis cover)
The Lamia (Genesis cover)
Deeper Still
Blackest Deeds
~ Encore
New Normal (with John Hackett)
Firth of Fifth (with John Hackett)
MUSICIANS
JSimone Rossetti – Vocals, Flute
Marco Fabbri – Drums, Percussion
Giorgio Gabriel – Acoustic & Electric Guitar
Valerio De Vittorio – Keyboards, Acoustic guitar, Vocals
Mattia Rossetti – Bass Guitar, 12-String Electric Guitar, Vocals
Special guest:
John Hackett – Flute

LINKS
The Watch – Website | Facebook


Photos by Ron Kraaijkamp (Cultuurpodium Boerderij)


Progdreams Festival – Facebook

This week on Prog-Watch there’s more great new prog rock from How Far To Hitchin’, Klone, Steve Hackett and the Genesis Revisited Band and Orchestra, the Earthling Society, and Richard Henshall (of Haken)! Also, some classic music from Joe Walsh, and Port Noir on Progressive Discoveries with Dr. Rob Fisher!

642: Variety + Port Noir on Progressive Discoveries

 

This news story was originally published here: http://theprogressiveaspect.net/blog/2019/10/16/david-gilmour-and-richard-thompson/

The Royal Albert Hall, London
Monday, 30th September 2019

Over the last few years there have been a couple of occasions where I’ve seriously kicked myself after missing out on iconic concerts; Led Zeppelin at the O2 and Kate Bush in Hammersmith being two that instantly spring to mind. Mainly it was down to cost, or at least, in the case of Zeppelin, just not having the buying power, but still, now I look back with regrets at having missed out on those moments of musical history. There are, however, a couple of musicians for whom money will never be an issue with, at the top of that list, being the man I hold up as the greatest musician of them all. That man being Richard Thompson.

In April this year Richard turned 70 years of age and with it was announced a celebration concert that was held on the 30th September in The Royal Albert Hall. As soon as it was announced, tickets were purchased and expectation began to ramp up, especially as guests were announced with, for me, the cherry on top of the cake being the guitar maestro that is David Gilmour of Pink Floyd. The chance to see my two favourite guitarists of all time on stage together; my oh my, it was going to be Fender heaven!

Hugh Cornwall

Hugh Cornwall

The only question remaining was what songs would be performed? Surely with a 50-plus years’ worth of genius songwriting, this was a show that could go on for weeks. In the end though, the songs chosen were a brilliant mixture of Richard’s amazing career mixed with his obvious love and admiration for his contemporaries, friends and family and all the music that they have produced as well. We saw and heard Richard’s talent in being able to effortlessly slip into different styles, from performing punk classics with school friend, and first-ever bandmate Hugh Cornwell of The Stranglers, hard rock thrash with Bob Mould of Hüsker Dü, jazz with Judith Owens and the incomparable Danny Thompson on double bass to straight down the line folk brilliance with various members of the Waterson-Carthy clan, Richard’s virtuoso playing shone through. We even got some full-on heavy metal courtesy of Harry Shearer appearing as his bass playing Spinal Tap alter ego, Derek Smalls!

Dave Pegg

Dave Pegg

As I said before though, this wasn’t just about Richard as RT, in his typically modest, humble, almost self-deprecating way, was more than content to allow those who’d come to pay tribute to him take the spotlight and showcase their own talents. As Kate Rusby, who performed the classic Richard and Linda Thompson song Withered and Died before performing her own As The Lights Go Out, explained, Richard not only was able to give artists like her breaks and exposure through support slots on his album tours but also being forthcoming with support and advice off stage that helped those performers immensely.

Danny Thompson

Danny Thompson

Perhaps most fittingly though was the obvious love and pride Richard takes in the generations of Thompsons that have and will continue to follow in his footsteps. With youngest son Jack compering the evening, we also were lucky enough to see all the performing members of his family on stage with his son Teddy, daughter Kami and their mother Linda, as well as grandson Zak Hobbs all supporting Richard beautifully and emotionally. Teddy’s duet of Persuasion with his dad was one of very many highlights throughout the show. And if his immediate family were all present, so too was The Fairport Convention family. Original member Ashley Hutchings and his 1966 diary and future members Dave Mattacks and Dave Pegg all performed excellently and even Simon Nicol, despite what must have been a nightmare day getting back from Greece in the wake of the Thomas Cook collapse, making the encore of Meet On The Ledge demonstrated the feelings that still are felt over 50 years after Ashley and Simon first invited ‘Rich’ to form a ‘folk rock outfit’ in Muswell Hill as teenagers.

Richard Thompson & Bob Mould

Richard Thompson and Bob Mould

As for highlights, wow… there were just so many. Eliza Carthy’s unaccompanied The Great Valerio, David Gilmour’s Dimming Of The Day, Dave Pegg performing Down Where The Drunkards Roll, Turning Of The Tide with Bob Mould… I could just go on and on and on. Just read the setlist below and accept it, every single performance was a highlight, a moment of musical majesty, an emotional tour de force. A celebration of the greatest musician the world has ever seen. This is a concert that will live long in the memory of every single one of the 6,000 people who were blessed to have turned out on a rainy Monday night in London to pay tribute to Richard Thompson. This was, without doubt, the greatest night of music I have ever experienced in my life.

[This review was first published on Jez Denton’s Tarka Blowpig Music blog.]

SETLIST
Set 1:

The Storm Won’t Come – The Electric Trio
Tobacco Road – with Hugh Cornwall
Peaches – with Hugh Cornwall
The Most Beautiful Girl In Hollywood – with Hugh Cornwall
Blues In My Bottle – with Ashley Hutchings, Dave Mattacks & Blair Dunlop
Jack O’Diamonds – with Ashley Hutchings, Dave Mattacks & Blair Dunlop
Down Where The Drunkards Roll – with Dave Pegg
Turning Of The Tide – with Bob Mould
If I Can’t Change Your Mind – with Bob Mould
Withered And Died – with Kate Rusby
As The Lights Go Out – Kate Rusby
The Bonnie Lass o’ Fyvie – with Marc Ellington
Fare Thee Well – with Martin Carthy
Fine Horseman – with Martin Carthy & Marry Waterson
The Great Valerio – Eliza Carthy
Hug You Like A Mountain – with Eliza Carthy

Set 2:
Beeswing – with Alistair Anderson
Madame Bonaparte – with Alistair Anderson
Persuasion – with Teddy Thompson
Ghost In The Wind – with Danny Thompson, Christine Collister & Dave Mattacks
Sweetheart On The Barricade – with Danny Thompson
Who Knows Where The Time Goes – with Olivia Chaney
House On The Hill – Olivia Chaney
Sheath And Knife – Maddy Prior
Grey Funnel Line – with Maddy Prior
Keep Your Distance – with The Rails
That’s Enough – with The Rails, Linda Thompson, Teddy Thompson, Zak Hobbs & Jack Thompson
Cry Me A River – with Judith Owens, Danny Thompson & Dave Mattacks
She Puts The Bitch In Obituary – with Derek Smalls
The Swimming Song – with Loudon Wainwright III
I Want To See The Bright Lights Tonight – with Loudon Wainwright III
Dimming Of The Day – with David Gilmour
Fat Old Sun – with David Gilmour
Meet On The Ledge

LINKS
Richard Thompson – Website | Facebook