This news story was originally published here: https://theprogressiveaspect.net/blog/2019/12/06/yogi-lang-a-way-out-of-here/

Well, what a pleasant surprise this release is! I’m not particularly an aficionado of RPWL, so whilst I might have reasonably expected some sort of Floydian feel to frontman Yogi Lang’s second solo effort, I wasn’t ready for what I’m hearing. To be honest, it sounds like the kind of solo album which Dave Gilmour might wish he’d made, and had he done so, it would, of course, sell by the truckload. The guitar style of Torsten Weber and song structures are very Gilmouresque, but it’s the voice of Yogi Lang that clinches it! Happily though, Yogi Lang does have his own personality shining through this collection of songs, so we’ll get over it.

Opener Move On is a strong start, with an insistent mid-tempo riff and keys which sweep you along immediately. Yogi plays all the keyboards and really excels on this song, which is probably the most immediately memorable on the album. Lang’s synth solo is delightfully simple, giving way to a grandstand guitar solo from Weber which is just right. At nine-plus minutes, it’s the lengthiest track, but I’d be happy for it to carry on longer! But less is sometimes more, and the title track shuffles in, much more lively, and the female backing vocals, which are present throughout, make their presence felt particularly here. It’s a very catchy song, and we really are off to a good start.

Shine On Me sounds a little bit like Steven Wilson at his most reflective, as does Don’t Confuse Life With A Thought (eh?!), and both are very enjoyable mid-tempo songs, oozing class in the musicianship and production departments. I don’t think anyone would claim anything ground-breaking about the fayre on offer here, and it’s certainly nothing new. That’s not really the point, not everything can be or needs to be radical. This album is simply well written and crafted classic rock. The promo blurb describes it as art rock, but I disagree; it’s classic rock, played with passion and skill. That’s enough sometimes.

Early Morning Light is another stand out track, possibly the most Floydian here. It starts out with an easy jammy feel, briefly reminiscent of the mid-section of Echoes, before progressing into something else, but maintaining its Gilmour credentials throughout this fabulous instrumental. Again Torsten Weber shines on this piece. Also worthy of mention is Freedom of the Day, the only co-write with a certain Mr Guy Pratt! You see it’s not me, Yogi himself seems to actively invite comparisons with a certain band I’ve mentioned once or twice (but I think I got away with)!

The philosophy behind this album seems to run along the lines of, the world is in a mess and we aren’t sure how it came to this, but love conquers all. Or something like that, so overall, it’s pretty upbeat lyrically. If I’ve got any real criticism, it would only be the pacing of the album, as too many songs are in this very comfortable mid-tempo, and it would benefit from the occasional jolt, like A Way Out Of Here provides after Move On. Aside from that, and the fact it’s taken nine years to create, I have to say that after repeated listens, I’m really enjoying it, so he must be doing something right. And I’m darn sure it will take more than nine years to follow up Rattle That Lock! Just saying!!

TRACK LISTING
01. Move On
2. A Way Out Of Here
3. Shine On Me
4. Don’t Confuse Life With A Thought
5. Love Is All Around
6. Freedom Of The Day
7. Early Morning Light
8. The Sound Of The Ocean
9. I’ll Be There For You

MUSICIANS
Yogi Lang – Vocals, Keyboards, Production
Torsten Weber – Guitars
Stephen Treutter – Drums
Yvo Fischer – Bass
Conny Kreitmeier – Backing Vocals
Bine Heller – Backing Vocals
Kalle Wallner – Guitar Solo (tracks 4 & 9)
Klaus Reichart – Pedal Steel, Mandolin

ADDITIONAL INFO
Record Label: Gentle Art of Music
Country of Origin: Germany
Date of Release: 8th November 2019

LINKS
Yogi Lang – Website | Facebook

Northern Star 5th December 2019.

Drifted Sun!

http://www.driftingsun.co.uk/

Theme Pallas – Northern Star

  • Nine Skies – Soldiers of shame
  • Colin Mold – Blood on Your Hands
  • Nine Stones Close – Falling to pieces
  • Drifting Sun – Night time sorrow
  • Drifting Sun – Within Your bones
  • Drifting Sun – Diogenes
  • Drifting Sun – Planet Junkie
  • Drifting Sun – To Tame a star
  • Drifting Sun – Everlasting creed
  • Head with Wings – Somewhere Something gives
  • Riversea – Strange land
  • Karnataka – Our Love
  • Mandalaband – Shemsu Har

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101 Dimensions Curated by Emma

…!

Broadcast 30th November 2019

  • Steve Roach – A circular ceremony
  • Fanger & Schönwälder feat Cosmic Hoffmann-Earshot – Earshot pt 1
  • D Helping & Jon Jenkins – Not a soul Not a sound
  • Binar – Another day in la la Land
  • Council of Nine – The magi
  • Pulsar – The Strands of the future
  • Imler & Liebezeit – Sempiternity
  • Fanger & Schönwälder feat Cosmic Hoffmann-Earshot – Earshot Pt 2
  • D Helping – Glass
  • Petri Alanko & Martin Stig Andersen – Portam ad Inferno
  • 2-й СОРТ – T 4
  • Friedman & Liebezeit – Morning Has broken
  • PiNioL – Mimolle
  • Giant Robot – Chicken boy
  • Fanger & Schönwälder feat Cosmic Hoffmann-Earshot – Earshot Pt 3

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This news story was originally published here: https://www.prog-sphere.com/interviews/dancing-sun-interview/

This past June, Austrian experimental metal one-man band Dancing Sun released its debut album entitled ‘Firefable.’ We asked the Graz-based musician questions about the record, his musical vision, and more.

Define the mission of Dancing Sun.

There is a dream and some noble ideals concerning the process of creativity. Dancing Sun: The servant of tales.

Songs and tales have a life. Tread them respectfully. Balance active and passive — don’t take the sledgehammer to hand over your personal intentions nor don’t get lost in a cast off thread story.

Tell me about the creative process that informed your recent album “Firefable” and the themes it captures.

It’s been a while ago, when I read an interview with the highly respected grandmaster Dan Swanö. As far as I remember he meant he wrote some songs of his 1998 solo album “Moontower” in a few hours. Yes, and there are a lot of his kind, I confess I can only take this statement as a counterpart — no I am not such genius and I am not as fast as Bob Ross.

Dancing Sun and especially the “Firefable” songs are a long-time run fresco, where you paint the background with horizon — break — then beach and tamarisk trees — break — then windsurfing girls — break — flying water and sand — finish. Sounds summer time easy, but “Firefable” got a lot developed by toss and turning thoughts, it’s kind of a consecration, wonderful exciting like the first child. I am a great fan of Lotte — last track on the album, “Lotte’s song,” it’s got a more spontaneous approach.

What is the message you are trying to give with “Firefable”?

First, there are more things that we don’t know, than things we know about a certain object. There is a message of Firefable I’m not aware of and one I can imagine: Listening to music is a shift into another world.

Fantasy literature, Progressive Rock, and many others are ideally suited for a tour into something archaic or some inner world confrontation with a lot of basic elements such as water or fire – That’s where the Firefable is placed: In the title-track-scenario some weird dudes are sitting around a bonfire listening to stories of Healing Silence, Dead Waters or Birds of Fire and one of this fellows is the listener of Dancing Suns “Firefable”. The inclusion of the audience is a romantic novelists’ trick. The old archetypical fire-setting is a place, where every day life is forgotten & time is nothing. And there are questions – for example – Have you ever seen the flameflooded kingdoms, while you stared into the embers? That’s a good initial point for an inner adventure, when somebody jumps into the storyteller’s role, even better. There we are – a storyteller’s eldorado, a time-out, an old black book with a labyrinth-look-a-like firesign on it called Firefable.

Firefable by Dancing Sun

How did you document the music while it was being formulated?

You never know when you get kissed by the muse. She’s writing in my small black memo book, I always carry with me. Another example of documenting was invented last December, when I had the intention to quit music after the Firefable-album. Before it was even finished a canadian Punk-Rock-band kicked my ass to write the first song of the next album & let the sun dance again. At December there’s been plenty of paper crap beside my swedish oven, so the lyrics were written on a paper box. That’s very convenient, because it’s a stand-alone for singing – my recommendation. Beside this out of the blue-pop-up-creativity-events, sometimes meticulous field studies take place prior a song is started – for example, I’ve interviewed some months several ancestors, worked through the family tree, and went to several venues for the genealogical “Tree”.

Is the dynamic flow of the pieces carefully architected?

Yes.

Describe the approach to recording the album.

It’s been hard work and it’s been the proper way for Firefable. Nowadays I try to be more sensitive for both worlds – between the focus on discipline, playing technics etc. & the fun of composing. A good flow by keeping the creative “Heat of the moment” (Asia is great!) and the recording session in a near distance – I don’t instantly eat the apple while it is falling from the tree, and I don’t put it in the freezer until the next Apfelstrudel – I’ve got a nerdy little room-in-room-home-studio waiting for me any time to write and record songs on the fly.

How long “Firefable” was in the making?

How long do you have time? Once upon a time there’s been a full length album of Dancing Sun called “Unbosom” in 2015. It has never been released. Tree, the last track of Firefable has went through transitions. There’s been an evolution from songs like “Powwow of the Tree” and “Rags to Riches” until another coat of paint has joined the canvas titled “Tree”. The carcassesque “Dead Waters” went through similar metamorphoses.

Which bands or artists influenced your work on the release?

Dead can Dance, Carcass, Renaissance, Nevermore. Song structurally maybe Mastodon. Vocals influenced by Taneli Jarva. FX-Playfulness while mixing My Dying Bride Mastering Sound references Ulver “Childhood’s end” and Kontinuum “Kyrr”.

What is your view on technology in music?

Devin Townsend and Suzanne Vega don’t share the same equipment, but both are fine.

Do you see your music as serving a purpose beyond music?

Let’s talk about the purpose of metal & music in general. I remember a guy I met 2008 in a youth hostel in San Francisco, who worked like mad in a factory at the harbor. Beside shower and sleep there were only two hours spare-time left for him day by day. He meant that this two hours were his resurrection time. It was time for Iron Maiden. Of course legend-building takes history as a bitch, the Birmingham phenomenon is one major basis for the invention and living the steel. One of the many purposes of Metal could be the way to cope with reality, with the human race & to be thrown into your own personal soup. Why not call it a beneficial escapism, if it’s a vessel to come along with your life, to scream and come back from a liberating gig with a smile upon your face. Art for the sake of art is fine too, but meanwhile I’d be simple as it gets an even more happy Bird, if Dancing Sun would make some other birds more happy.

What are your plans for the future?

I’d like to make a roadtrip with a big bus through 3 districts eastern from my hometown Graz in Austria. Beside I’m quite far with Dancing Sun’s forthcoming album. I love the new songs, I would have liked to release these type of songs earlier, but Firefable has been Firefable, it had to be as dark as it gets. This time I’m happy to give mixing in the hands of a very skillful sound engineer: Andi Gassner also mixed “Laszlo Podenco’s Dreams” on Firefable.

We’ve got a good flow.

Furthermore there are also questions concerning Dancing Sun like “can a one man show be non-egocentric?” Once, when Mormons addressed me on the street at their promo tour, I’ve been in the mood and asked “but what about Metal & windsurfing?”, they answered “you can not have both!” Let’s see.

Firefable is out now on Bandcamp.

The post DANCING SUN: The Servant of Tales appeared first on Prog Sphere.

This news story was originally published here: http://www.prog-sphere.com/interviews/dancing-sun-interview/

This past June, Austrian experimental metal one-man band Dancing Sun released its debut album entitled ‘Firefable.’ We asked the Graz-based musician questions about the record, his musical vision, and more.

Define the mission of Dancing Sun.

There is a dream and some noble ideals concerning the process of creativity. Dancing Sun: The servant of tales.

Songs and tales have a life. Tread them respectfully. Balance active and passive — don’t take the sledgehammer to hand over your personal intentions nor don’t get lost in a cast off thread story.

Tell me about the creative process that informed your recent album “Firefable” and the themes it captures.

It’s been a while ago, when I read an interview with the highly respected grandmaster Dan Swanö. As far as I remember he meant he wrote some songs of his 1998 solo album “Moontower” in a few hours. Yes, and there are a lot of his kind, I confess I can only take this statement as a counterpart — no I am not such genius and I am not as fast as Bob Ross.

Dancing Sun and especially the “Firefable” songs are a long-time run fresco, where you paint the background with horizon — break — then beach and tamarisk trees — break — then windsurfing girls — break — flying water and sand — finish. Sounds summer time easy, but “Firefable” got a lot developed by toss and turning thoughts, it’s kind of a consecration, wonderful exciting like the first child. I am a great fan of Lotte — last track on the album, “Lotte’s song,” it’s got a more spontaneous approach.

What is the message you are trying to give with “Firefable”?

First, there are more things that we don’t know, than things we know about a certain object. There is a message of Firefable I’m not aware of and one I can imagine: Listening to music is a shift into another world.

Fantasy literature, Progressive Rock, and many others are ideally suited for a tour into something archaic or some inner world confrontation with a lot of basic elements such as water or fire – That’s where the Firefable is placed: In the title-track-scenario some weird dudes are sitting around a bonfire listening to stories of Healing Silence, Dead Waters or Birds of Fire and one of this fellows is the listener of Dancing Suns “Firefable”. The inclusion of the audience is a romantic novelists’ trick. The old archetypical fire-setting is a place, where every day life is forgotten & time is nothing. And there are questions – for example – Have you ever seen the flameflooded kingdoms, while you stared into the embers? That’s a good initial point for an inner adventure, when somebody jumps into the storyteller’s role, even better. There we are – a storyteller’s eldorado, a time-out, an old black book with a labyrinth-look-a-like firesign on it called Firefable.

Firefable by Dancing Sun

How did you document the music while it was being formulated?

You never know when you get kissed by the muse. She’s writing in my small black memo book, I always carry with me. Another example of documenting was invented last December, when I had the intention to quit music after the Firefable-album. Before it was even finished a canadian Punk-Rock-band kicked my ass to write the first song of the next album & let the sun dance again. At December there’s been plenty of paper crap beside my swedish oven, so the lyrics were written on a paper box. That’s very convenient, because it’s a stand-alone for singing – my recommendation. Beside this out of the blue-pop-up-creativity-events, sometimes meticulous field studies take place prior a song is started – for example, I’ve interviewed some months several ancestors, worked through the family tree, and went to several venues for the genealogical “Tree”.

Is the dynamic flow of the pieces carefully architected?

Yes.

Describe the approach to recording the album.

It’s been hard work and it’s been the proper way for Firefable. Nowadays I try to be more sensitive for both worlds – between the focus on discipline, playing technics etc. & the fun of composing. A good flow by keeping the creative “Heat of the moment” (Asia is great!) and the recording session in a near distance – I don’t instantly eat the apple while it is falling from the tree, and I don’t put it in the freezer until the next Apfelstrudel – I’ve got a nerdy little room-in-room-home-studio waiting for me any time to write and record songs on the fly.

How long “Firefable” was in the making?

How long do you have time? Once upon a time there’s been a full length album of Dancing Sun called “Unbosom” in 2015. It has never been released. Tree, the last track of Firefable has went through transitions. There’s been an evolution from songs like “Powwow of the Tree” and “Rags to Riches” until another coat of paint has joined the canvas titled “Tree”. The carcassesque “Dead Waters” went through similar metamorphoses.

Which bands or artists influenced your work on the release?

Dead can Dance, Carcass, Renaissance, Nevermore. Song structurally maybe Mastodon. Vocals influenced by Taneli Jarva. FX-Playfulness while mixing My Dying Bride Mastering Sound references Ulver “Childhood’s end” and Kontinuum “Kyrr”.

What is your view on technology in music?

Devin Townsend and Suzanne Vega don’t share the same equipment, but both are fine.

Do you see your music as serving a purpose beyond music?

Let’s talk about the purpose of metal & music in general. I remember a guy I met 2008 in a youth hostel in San Francisco, who worked like mad in a factory at the harbor. Beside shower and sleep there were only two hours spare-time left for him day by day. He meant that this two hours were his resurrection time. It was time for Iron Maiden. Of course legend-building takes history as a bitch, the Birmingham phenomenon is one major basis for the invention and living the steel. One of the many purposes of Metal could be the way to cope with reality, with the human race & to be thrown into your own personal soup. Why not call it a beneficial escapism, if it’s a vessel to come along with your life, to scream and come back from a liberating gig with a smile upon your face. Art for the sake of art is fine too, but meanwhile I’d be simple as it gets an even more happy Bird, if Dancing Sun would make some other birds more happy.

What are your plans for the future?

I’d like to make a roadtrip with a big bus through 3 districts eastern from my hometown Graz in Austria. Beside I’m quite far with Dancing Sun’s forthcoming album. I love the new songs, I would have liked to release these type of songs earlier, but Firefable has been Firefable, it had to be as dark as it gets. This time I’m happy to give mixing in the hands of a very skillful sound engineer: Andi Gassner also mixed “Laszlo Podenco’s Dreams” on Firefable.

We’ve got a good flow.

Furthermore there are also questions concerning Dancing Sun like “can a one man show be non-egocentric?” Once, when Mormons addressed me on the street at their promo tour, I’ve been in the mood and asked “but what about Metal & windsurfing?”, they answered “you can not have both!” Let’s see.

Firefable is out now on Bandcamp.

The post DANCING SUN: The Servant of Tales appeared first on Prog Sphere.

This news story was originally published here: https://theprogressiveaspect.net/blog/2019/12/05/franck-carducci-the-answer/

Flamboyant French rock musician Franck Carducci, with his very talented band, is becoming increasingly well known for his entertaining and spectacular live shows, full of eye-catching theatre, humour and high-quality musicianship, conveyed with great style and elan. Therefore, it’s a surprise that his latest (and third) studio album The Answer is not only a vehicle for his distinctive brand of theatrical music but also touches on some deeper themes which affect us all. Franck has shared that the album revolves around the main question of ‘what is the meaning of human life?’ – just that rather small subject!!! However, never fear dear readers, Franck Carducci has not transmogrified into some sort of introverted chin-stroking intellectual – nope, he has not lost that glint in his eye and this album is absolutely saturated with great tunes and hooks, and is an absolute joy.

Franck and his excellent band gig relentlessly, with frequent tours around Europe and the U.K., and this persistence and stamina over the years is gradually building a growing fan base. Virtually anyone who has been fortunate enough to have seen them in action has no doubt been immediately won over as fans – their shows are that infectious. This sense of professionalism and faith in their own talent has driven Franck and his band on, no matter the size of the venue or the crowd. It has been four years since their last studio album, but it has not been four years without new songs as Franck has been gradually introducing new songs into the set. At least four of these ‘new songs’ on this album have been played in concert for the last few years, so many fans will have some familiarity with it, particularly the rifftastic Slave to Rock’n’Roll and Franck’s acapella tribute to the Woodstock Generation, On the Road to Nowhere. This ‘road testing’ in a live environment over some time has resulted in material that has become finely honed and polished, really working as ‘Songs’ – these are not complex, dense or cerebral pieces, they are captivating and catchy songs with memorable melodies, riffs and straightforward lyrics, written from and for the Heart.

The Answer commences in cinematic fashion with the title track, eerie synth and droning didgeridoo, from Christophe Obadiah, underpinning a delicate acoustic guitar. A strumming guitar and harmony vocals take us into a hippy-like reverie of positivity. A great bass line from Carducci himself combines beautifully with a dancing Hammond organ line from Olivier Castan, before the jangling acoustic guitars take us back into the sunny uplands in which this lovely optimistic song saunters – it’s clear that the message is that LOVE is the Answer, and who could argue with that feeling? It’s not rocket science as a song or a concept, but it’s an answer too few seem to be able to accept.

The album goes off in another direction for the next two pieces, based on the fictional story of the rock star ‘Arion’. Franck says that Slave to Rock’n’Roll can be seen as the hit that made Arion a superstar, and perhaps in another time and in different circumstances it should have been a hit in real life. This is a straight-ahead and accessible heavy rock song with earworm hooks and fantastic rock’n’roll riffs. As a live piece, Carducci opens the shows with the Arion character entering in suitably ‘over the top’ style as the band cranks out some infectious heavy chords from Christophe Obadiah and Steve Marsala – it has real echoes of classic early ’70s Alice Cooper in sound and flamboyant style. It’s a fantastic show opener that has lost none of its power and ‘pizzazz’ on the album, Franck capturing that great live energy in the studio. The following Superstar is more retrained but also more ambitious and multi-faceted as it tells the story of Arion. Acoustic guitars and Castan on fluid Hammond organ take us right into the story with some excellent vocals from Franck, along with his outstanding bass, with which he anchors each song, but additionally, his distinctive bass style impels it to the fore as a lead instrument in some parts, such is his skill. The lovely voice of Mary Reynaud takes up the lead in a more plaintive section before ‘Arion’ himself returns as the story takes a more sinister turn. The song goes into rock theatre as a crowd chants, “We want your Money, we want your Money!” and then we are treated to a guitar solo that could have graced any Elton John album from his Goodbye Yellow Brick Road era. A ‘Splash’ plunges the listener into another environment altogether as the song descends into melancholy with a sinking, drowning feeling. It is a fairly low-key ending and for me it was not wholly successful as a piece – but that is small criticism in an album which is overwhelmingly excellent.

Franck Carducci is clearly a warm person and he re-iterates the central theme that LOVE is the Answer with a simple message, seemingly aimed at his daughter, in The Game of Life, accompanied beautifully on piano by Richard Vecchi, with a lovely lilting jazz feel added by the gorgeous trumpet of Thierry Seneau – this is nothing like we have heard from Franck before and it’s refreshing to see him stretching himself in another direction. Similarly, in Beautiful Night, one of the ‘Bonus tracks’, Franck plays ALL the instruments himself in a gentle piece which chimes along with a soulful vocal, dripping with emotion before atmospherically drifting off into the starry night sky with synth lines intertwining and receding into the cosmic distance.

The main album concludes with Asylum which opens with a Gothic opening. Franck has described it as “a crazy story I invented – it’s kind of in-between One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest and Orwell’s 1984”, which is quite a claim! There is a clear reference to the classic Supertramp song Asylum as the lyrics mention “sitting next to Jimmy Cream”, the main protagonist of that great song. Franck covered School on his previous album, Torn Apart, so it should come as no surprise that this influence should surface in terms of theme and feel on this very good song – indeed it almost sounds like a sequel to that fine piece.  A driving rhythmic rock riff, with a great lead guitar from guest Fabrice Dutour, gives way to a more plaintive piano section (a la Supertramp?!). Derek Sherinian (ex-Dream Theater) provides a tremendous rising Hammond organ solo – and the fact he also played with Alice Cooper once again underlines Carducci’s resonance with the widescreen rock theatre of such early ’70s artists. A wah-wah guitar leads us into a brief but explosive and flowing drum solo from guest drummer, the outstanding Jimmy Palagrosi (Zio & ex-Karnataka), before Dutour really takes off on guitar in a dazzling finale. Carducci screams “No-one escapes the Asylum” in a suitably spectacular and slightly insane conclusion to this Rock Circus of an album.

However, even that dramatic epic is surpassed by the centrepiece and standout track, the allegorical sci-fi tale The After Effect. Carducci has shared that this song is about an “Outer Space Entity who comes to Earth to try to find the meaning of our insignificant lives – we come to life, we live, we die… But what purpose do we serve?” This is a piece with an ambitious theme, but is it successful as a piece of music?

The answer is undoubtedly in the affirmative. A female vocalisation with piano and guitar introduces us into a widescreen soundscape as Carducci sings forcefully over powerful rock.  Antonino Reina is particularly outstanding on this piece, with some incendiary drumming to emphasise the extra-terrestrial drama that unfolds. Franck’s band is in volcanic and furious form, thrusting the song forward on musical afterburners. Franck and Mary combine so well vocally, conveying a sense of madness as they sing “I’m losing control”. A weird interlude of throbbing synths and swooping, eerie sound effects is only the prelude to a powerfully stellar conclusion. Carducci has said that the Entity is timeless and knows the consequence of any action she takes, so our lives seem meaningless to her. It is only when the Entity realises the fragility of humans and the power of Love that she understands.

Franck Carducci is a consummate rock artist with a real sense of drama, fun and showmanship in a live context. This outstanding album exemplifies those qualities but adds more breadth, subtlety and emotion.

Is this one of the best progressive rock albums of 2019?

That’s a debatable question. Franck very much wears his ’70s influences very clearly on his sleeve. He’s not ‘edgy’ or experimental – he is gorgeously melodic, wildly exciting and massively entertaining, and this album brilliantly captures those qualities. Whatever the answer, this is a great album.

Love is definitely The Answer… that’s always the RIGHT Answer.

TRACK LISTING
01. (Love is) The Answer (8:01)
02. Slave to Rock’n’Roll (5:42)
03. Superstar (12:28)
04. The After Effect (10:03)
05. The Game of Life (4:32)
06. Asylum (11:11)
~ Bonus tracks:
07. On the Road to Nowhere (2:38)
08. Beautiful Night (7:10)
09. (Love is) The Answer [Radio Cut] (4:07)
10. Slave to Rock’n’Roll [Radio Cut] (3:56)

Total Time – 69:50

MUSICIANS
Franck Carducci – Vocals, 12-string, Electric & Bass Guitars, Synth (track 3), Piano (track 6), All Instruments & Vocals (track 8)
Mary Reynaud – Vocals (track 3), Backing Vocals (tracks 1,2,4,6 & 7), Theremin (track 4)
Antonino Reina – Drums (tracks 1,2,3 & 4), Backing Vocals (tracks 1,3 & 7)
Christophe Obadia – Electric Guitars (tracks 2,3 & 4), Didgeridoo (track 1), Backing Vocals (tracks 1,3 & 7)
Olivier Castan – Hammond Organ (tracks 1,2 & 3), Mellotron (tracks 1,2,3 & 4), Synths (tracks 1,2 & 4), Piano (track 4), Backing Vocals (tracks 1,2,3 & 7)
Steve Marsala – Electric Guitars (tracks 2,3 & 4), 12-string Guitar (track 3), Backing Vocals (tracks 1,2,3,4 & 7)
~ with:
Derek Sherinian – Hammod Organ, Mellotron (track 6)
Jimmy Palagrosi – Drums (track 6)
Fabrice Dutour – Lead Guitar (track 6)
Richard Vecchi – Piano (track 5)
Thierry Seneau – Trumpet (track 5)
Sandra Reina – Backing Vocals (tracks 1,3 & 6)
Amelyn Vecchi – Backing Vocals (tracks 1,3 & 6)

ADDITIONAL INFO
Record Label: Independent
Country of Origin: France
Date of Release: 28th November 2019

DISCOGRAPHY
– Oddity (2011)
– Torn Apart (2015)
– Tearing the Tour Apart (2016)

LINKS
Franck Carducci – Website | Facebook | Twitter | Bandcamp

LFPT - Requests
I’m delighted to announce that the podcast for edition 317 of Live From Progzilla Towers is now available.

In this all request edition we heard the following music:

  1. Nektar – Recycled (Part One)
  2. Godiego – The Birth Of The Odyssey (Monkey Magic)
  3. Tony Banks – The Border
  4. Kompendium – Mercy Of The Sea
  5. Twelfth Night – Creepshow
  6. John Hackett & Nick Fletcher – A Horse Named Cadillac
  7. Colosseum II – Rivers
  8. Wobbler – Fermented Hours
  9. Hawkwind – Hurry On Sundown
  10. Frank Zappa – What’s New In Baltimore
  11. IZZ – I Move
  12. Anthony Phillips & Andrew Skeet – Old Sarum Suite
  13. Deeexpus – King Of Number 33
  14. Caravan – Golf Girl
  15. Pink Floyd – Cymbaline
  16. Frank Wyatt And Friends – Zeitgeist
  17. The Prog World Orchestra – Silent Night / We All Need Some Light
  18. Chris De Burgh – A Spaceman Came Travelling
  19. Twelfth Night – Love Song

iTunes/iPod users*: Just search for ‘Progzilla’ or subscribe to: http://podcasts.progzilla.com/cliff/podcast.xml

Enjoy!

This news story was originally published here: http://www.insideoutmusic.com/newsdetailed.aspx?IdNews=23968&IdCompany=8

US Progressive Metal pioneers and innovators PSYCHOTIC WALTZ return in full original line-up with their highly anticipated 5th studio album and first new music in 23 years. Entitled “The God-Shaped Void”, the upcoming new album and InsideOutMusic debut will be released on February 14th, 2020.

The basic tracks for “The God-Shaped Void” were recorded with engineer Ulrich Wild in the band’s hometown of San Diego, then the rest of the recordings at Studio D in Austria and finally the material was mixed/mastered by Jens Bogren (Opeth, Devin Townsend, Fates Warning) at Fascination Street Studios in Sweden. Artwork, as to be seen above, was created by longtime visual partner Travis Smith (Katatonia, Riverside, Nevermore).

PSYCHOTIC WALTZ guitarist Dan Rock checked in to comment about the creation and recording process of “The God-Shaped Void” as follows:

First we’d like to thank all the fans who have supported us over the years. The new album would probably not exist if it were not for the good times and fan support we had on our reunion tours of Europe in 2011/2012. It really sunk in how cool I would be to make new music again, instead of just continually playing the first four albums. With all of us living further apart, especially Devon, it was a much slower process than having all five of us in the same room like we used to. But times change, and the Internet helped quite a bit. Normally, Brian and I would come up with guitar parts at home, whether alone or together. Sometimes we would program a basic drum beat for Norm to latch onto the vibe that we were feeling, and some of those stayed, while others were greatly improved upon by his far superior drum skills. We took our time (obviously) and went one song at a time and rehearsed it and recorded it in the jam room until we were musically happy with it. Then I would upload the individual tracks for Devon to download in his home studio so that he could remix it, and really see what each guy was doing. He was able to add vocals, make edits and rearrange parts that made for sense for him as a singer, and then send it back to us to review, retrack or punch in if needed… we did all of our pre-production mixes that way.

I think Devon did a really great job considering the process, but we all wanted to bring in a professional set of outside ears with more experience. We were fortunate enough to have Ulrich Wild come down to San Diego and do all the basic tracking in a little-known local studio called Rarefied. Even better, Jens Bogren had an opening in his schedule at Fascination Street Studios and was able to mix and master it for us. And none of this would have been possible if InsideOutMusic didn’t have the faith in us that they did to release a new record after such a long time. Many thanks go out to everybody who made it possible after all these years. We hope you find it worth the wait!

A first single and the pre-order for “The God-Shaped Void” in its various formats (Ltd. and Standard CD, 2LP on 180gr. black vinyl as well as limited coloured editions and also Digital Download) will be available as of December 13th, 2019, so stay tuned for more news soon…

Re-releases of the entire PSYCHOTIC WALTZ catalogue will follow through InsideOutMusic later in 2020 and next live activities in support of the new album will be revealed soon too.


PSYCHOTIC WALTZ line-up:
(Left to right on photo by Axel Jusseit)
Dan Rock – guitars & keys
Devon Graves – vocals
Ward Evans – bass
Norman Leggio – drums
Brian McAlpin – guitars

PSYCHOTIC WALTZ discography:
A Social Grace (1990)
Into The Everflow (1992)
Mosquito (1994)
Bleeding (1996)
The God-Shaped Void (2020)

PSYCHOTIC WALTZ online:
http://psychoticwaltz.com/
https://www.facebook.com/PsychoticWaltzOfficial/

 

This week Prog-Watch and The Progressive Aspect begin a three-part “prog-stravaganza” looking at the best albums of the past ten years! Ten of TPA’s reviewers have selected their three favorite albums, and I will be presenting their short reviews and playing tracks from those albums over the course of three programs!

With contributions from Rob Fisher, Basil Francis, Andrew Halley, Magnus Moar, Bob Mulvey, Jez Rowden, Graham Thomas, Roger Trenwith, Leo Trimming, and John Wenlock-Smith!

649: Prog-Watch and TPA Present the Best of 2010 – 2019, Pt. 1

 

This news story was originally published here: http://www.insideoutmusic.com/newsdetailed.aspx?IdNews=23966&IdCompany=8

German instrumental-rock group LONG DISTANCE CALLING recently released their first ever live album ‘STUMMFILM – Live from Hamburg (A Seats & Sounds Show)’. Filmed during a special run of dates in early 2019, it saw the band performing seated shows in some very special locations for a stunning audio-visual experience.

As a pre-holiday treat, the band have launched the clip for the track ‘The Very Last Day’, and you can watch that here: https://youtu.be/SJSsTKg3Jps

The band comments: “Here we go with a new live clip for ‘The Very Last Day’, one of our very first songs ever! It first appeared on our demo “Dmnstrtn”, made it on our debut album “Satellite Bay” and is now part of “Stummfilm – Live From Hamburg”, enhanced by the intense sound and atmosphere of a cello. The song deals with the issues of climate change so we decided to print a limited “The Very Last Day” shirt, which can be ordered in our webshop: https://bit.ly/33qS1AE , 5 Euro per shirt will be donated to Greenpeace!

Watch the previously released clips below:
Black Paper Planes: https://youtu.be/sFAf3ugFeGI 
On The Verge: https://youtu.be/GJVMqKfwz9s
Metulsky Curse Revisited: https://youtu.be/QVKF7KePGT4

‘STUMMFILM – Live from Hamburg (A Seats & Sounds Show)’ is available as a limited edition Blu-Ray + 2CD, Gatefold 3LP Vinyl & as digital audio download. Order now here: https://LongDistanceCalling.lnk.to/STUMMFILM-LiveFromHamburg 

the beauty shines through.” – Prog Magazine
expansive and career-defining” – Powerplay Magazine

The full track-listing is as follows:
1. Into The Black Wide Open
2. The Very Last Day
3. In The Clouds
4. Like A River
5. On The Verge
6. Interlude
7. Out There
8. Apparitions
9. Black Paper Planes
10. 359°
11. I Know You, Stanley Milgram!
12. Sundown Highway
13. Flux
14. Metulsky Curse Revisited

The band also recently announced that they would return to the ‘Seats & Sounds’ format for a German tour in September 2020, as well as an appearance at Prognosis Festival in Netherlands on the 21st March 2020.

08.09.20 Hamburg, kleine Elbphilharmonie – SOLD OUT
09.09.20 Hannover, Pavillon
10.09.20 Bochum, Christuskirche
11.09.20 Dresden, Alter Schlachthof
12.09.20 Leipzig, Parkbühne
13.09.20 Berlin, Passionskirche
15.09.20 Köln, E-Werk
16.09.20 Frankfurt, Jahrhunderthalle Club
17.09.20 Mannheim, Capitol
18.09.20 München, St. Matthäus
19.09.20 Stuttgart, Mozartsaal

For 13 years now, the Münster-based four-piece Long Distance Calling has been famed and cherished for its weightless yet massive music. After having returned to their instrumental roots Long Distance Calling sat down to carefully ponder their next step. When they got up again, they were ready for their most extraordinary live undertaking yet: Aptly entitled “Seats & Sounds”, this string of concerts saw Long Distance Calling take to the stage in very special locations in front on a seated audience.

The band took the matter almost religiously and went to great lengths in pulling off their most daring effort. “We wanted to go one step further, highlighting the audio-visual quality of the band for the very first time”, the band states, referring to the phalanx of video screens and specially curated visuals corresponding to each song.

One of those rare performances, the one at the Kulturkirche Altona in Hamburg, was captured on film and tape and is now being released. More an elegant silent film (visually speaking) than an ordinary live video, Long Distance Calling deliver a stunning performance in two acts: A “normal” Long Distance Calling set with songs from all their albums, and a special ‘Avoid the Light’ set, performing the dramatic album almost in its entirety. “This is one of the most important releases of our entire career”, the band continues, “and playing it felt like time travel.”

Meticulously prepared and rehearsed, this is Long Distance Calling on another level. Backed by guest musicians Luca Gilles on cello and Aaron Schrade on percussion and electronic beats, the experimental rock veterans show their grandeur in cinemascope – elaborately filmed and monumentally staged. In the end, Janosch Rathmer (drums), Jan Hoffmann (bass), Florian Füntmann (guitar) and David Jordan (guitar) not only played their biggest Hamburg headlining show; they also peaked their stellar career.

LONG DISTANCE CALLING online:
www.longdistancecalling.de/
www.facebook.com/longdistancecalling
www.instagram.com/longdistancecalling
https://longdistancecalling.merchcowboy.com/