EppyFest – the eclectic music festival run by Ian Fairholm of the Epileptic Gibbon Podcast, now in conjunction with Stephen Lambe and Huw Lloyd-Jones of Sonicbond Promotions – is happy to announce full details of its 7th edition. The festival will begin on the evening of Friday 27th July 2018 and continue on Saturday 28th beginning at around 1pm at its new home St. Margaret’s Hall, Coniston Road, Hatherley, Cheltenham GL51 3NU

Festival organiser Ian Fairholm talks about the new-look festival:

“I am delighted that my collaboration with Stephen and Huw has allowed the festival to spread its wings, by bringing in headliners of greater stature, so I am thrilled to have booked the legendary international psychedelic and progressive rock band Gong and the hugely popular English contemporary music ensemble – the North Sea Radio Orchestra. I am also excited to be able to bring back some familiar names in Sanguine Hum(acoustic), Neil Campbell and Firefly Burning, while making their first appearances will be Fractal Mirror (stripped down), Bristol-based band LORD OF WORMS and our Saturday special guest Doris Brendel, who has been described as a modern day Janis Joplin.”

Sponsor ticket (including an EppyFest 2018 T-shirt) at £60 and standard Friday / Saturday joint tickets priced £40 are on sale now. Day tickets will go on sale in the New Year.

Stephen Lambe discusses the new venue:

“After quite a search, we settled on St. Margaret’s Hall in Cheltenham as the new home of the festival. It’s a superb space, with room to grow and great on-site parking. It’s also nicely positioned so that it’s close to Cheltenham train station, 5 minutes from the M5 and not far from Cheltenham Town Centre with its wealth of accommodation.”

The line up:

Friday 27th July

Gong
Neil Campbell

Saturday 28th July

Evening

North Sea Radio Orchestra
Doris Brendel
Sanguine Hum (acoustic)

Afternoon
Firefly Burning
Lord of Worms
Fractal Mirror (stripped down)

More details to follow very soon!

This news story was originally published here: http://theprogressiveaspect.net/blog/2018/01/21/victim-of-illusion-invisible-light/

In the hustle and bustle of daily life it is all too easy to become distracted, overwhelmed and in the ceaseless noise which perpetually surrounds us, to lose our way. The continual clamour of social media, the relentless bewitchment of consumer advertising, the unyielding presence of politics, comment, opinion and ‘fake’ news captivates and beguiles us. We lose all sense of who we are, of what really matters and of the things we value most. The illusory replaces the real.

Invisible Light is a sharp, challenging, focused exploration of the borderlines and boundaries in our struggles with the murky worlds of fact and fiction, fantasy and reality and the quest to uncover who we want to be and how we want to live. It’s a deeply passionate, enthralling album which swirls and flows on an evocative sea of melodic textures, moods and contrasts. When combined with an unblinking steely, progressive metal-based foundation and a driving, substantive, hard rock spirit, we are presented with music with a wealth of substance, resolve and character.

A continual willingness to experiment with contrasts, play with changing time signatures and push rhythmic transitions creates songs which are deftly organic and intricately structured. It is precisely the inventive interplays of light and dark, discordant heaviness and melodic tranquillity which creates such a poignant and forceful atmosphere of charged emotions that grabs the attention and makes you sit up and take notice.

[embedded content]

Peter Hamer’s guitar playing is magnificent in the sheer range of expression he brings to each song. Luca Imerito’s bass lines weave and tease in direct response, sometimes commanding and imperious, at others complimentary and dynamic. The drumming of Michele Santoleri, joining the band for the first time on this album, brings a dazzling, nimble and decisive presence which colours and influences the shape and energy of each song. Above it all, Paolo Gurlino’s vocals bring an incisive edge and compelling allure which soothes, encourages and beckons you on.

The effect is refreshing in allowing a natural merging of differing styles and rhythms within a single song; the complex structure of each story is allowed to develop, evolve and go where it pleases. Opener A New Beginning is a brilliantly intricate series of musical passages which seamlessly blend into each other, dancing and darting from acoustic serenity to amplified outbursts of crunching power refrains and then to elegant, ambient melodic harmonies before toying again with a gentle acoustic.

The immediate contrast comes in the shape of Dewdrop, the second track, slower, darker, menacing, foreboding before yielding to a hypnotically soothing and melodic vocal, wandering off in turn to a rambling instrumental which inescapably leads to a triumphant chorus and mesmerising guitar solo. The fluidity and finesse of the movement from segment to segment is transfixing in the way it embraces and enfolds you in its absorbing soundscapes.

Hollow Man returns the spotlight once more to the main theme of the album. The bass work here is supreme, capturing echoes of Riverside and Black Sabbath in a repeating, anthemic, heavy set of undulating lines which are filled with a cold darkness. Our lives are empty, lived on the surface of a shallow culture which cares nothing for meaning.

The soulful and impassioned Lead Me in the Dark attempts to steer us away from the muddy depths and, along with The Wayfarer, tries to lift our eyes above the routine, the mundane and point us in more hopeful directions. Although more conventional tracks in terms of structure and composition, they do seem to lack something of the bite and the grittiness of what has come before.

Invisible Light is an unexpectedly persuasive and effective release which shines with purpose, enthusiasm and a well defined sense of musical vision. The construction of the songs displays a skilful agility and careful insight in shaping soundscapes which convey a powerful set of imaginative reflections on the struggles we face in being human amidst the clamour and the noise of modern life. It takes a few listens to begin to appreciate what the contrasts are trying to achieve and how they push the momentum of the music in certain directions, but it is certainly time well spent.

TRACK LISTING
01. A New Beginning (7:31)
02. Dewdrop (6:12)
03. Before My Eyes (6:49)
04. Whisper (5:14)
05. Escape From Reality (6:35)
06. Hollow Man (6:54)
07. Lead Me In The Dark (7:23)
08. The Wayfarer (5:11)

Total Time – 51:49

MUSICIANS
Paolo Gurlino – Vocals
Peter Hamer – Guitars, Synths & Programming
Luca Imerito – Bass

ADDITIONAL INFO
Record Label: Peter Hamer Productions
Catalogue#: VOI-CD2017
Format: Digital only (strictly limited number of CDs available only on request, if available)
Date of Release: 20th June 2017

LINKS
Victim of Illusion – Website | Facebook | Twitter | YouTube | Bandcamp

Tags:

Related Posts

No related posts found!


Northern Star  18th January 2018

The Grand Arena

Theme Pallas Northern Star

  1. Touchstone –Intro/Wintercoast
  2. The Cranberries – Waltzing Back
  3. Manfred Mann – Lies (through the 80s)
  4. Pink Floyd – Run Like hell
  5. Marillion – Fugazi
  6. Machines Dream – Noise To Signal
  7. Genesis – Carpet crawlers
  8. Twelfth Night – Fact & Fiction
  9. Pallas – Blood & Roses
  10. Tool – Merkaba
  11. Rainbow – 16th Century greensleeves
  12. Porcupine tree – The sky moves sideways
  13. RPWL – Trying to kis the sun
  14. Rush – By tor and the snow dog
  15. Spock’s beard – Welcome to NYC
  16. Spiritualized – Electric mainline
  17. Steely Dan – Kid Charlemagne
  18. Steve Hillage – The dervish riff
  19. Yes – Awaken

 

Tunein on http://tunein.com/radio/Progzilla-Radio-s242911/

The Google app or the Apple App

Repeat Shows Tuesdays 00.00 am GMT & 3.00pm GMT

Podcasts of all the shows are available here

http://www.progzilla.com/category/podcast/northern-star/feed/

Subscribe to the show here

http://www.progzilla.com/shows/northern-star/

If you have an requests or ideas about shows

Or anything else for that matter?

Contact me on Emma@progzilla.com

 

KRAZZ LOFT VINYL SHOW

Broadcast 18th January 2018

1.       Hope You’re Feeling Better Santana Abraxas 1974
2.       Country House Shuffle Dixie Dregs Night Of The Living Dregs 1979
3.       People Get Ready Jeff Beck Flash 1985
4.       Showdown Electric Light Orchestra On The Third Day 1973
5.       Desolation Valley Nektar A Tab In The Ocean 1972
6.       Waves Nektar A Tab In The Ocean 1972
7.       On The Turning Away Pink Floyd A Momentary Lapse Of Reason 1987
8.       PROMO BREAK #1
9.       Had To Cry Today Blind Faith Blind Faith 1969
10.   In Memory of Elizabeth Reed Allman Brothers Band Beginnings 1973
11.   It Just Ain’t Your Moon Atlanta Rhythm Section Dog Days 1975
12.  6-PACK OF “ROCK KEYS”      
13.   Don’t You Love Her Madly The Doors L.A. Woman 1971
14.   Smooth Dancer Deep Purple Who Do We Think We Are 1973
15.   Be My Lover, Be My Friend Argent All Together Now 1972
16.   The Barbarian Emerson Lake & Palmer Emerson Lake & Palmer 1971
17.   Sir Lancelot & The Black Knight Rick Wakeman The Myth & Legends of King Arthur 1975
18.   Teacher I Need You Elton John Don’t Shoot Me I’m Only The Piano Player 1972
19.
20.   Going To The Country Steve Miller Band Number 5 1970
21.   Get Wise Lindisfarne Back And Forth 1978
22.   Wall Street Shuffle 10 CC Sheet Music 1974
23.   Blue Spruce Woman Foghat Rock and Roll Outlaws 1974
24. ONE DEGREE OF SEPERATION
25.   Turn It On Trapeze Hot Wire 1974
26.   Muscle & Blood Hughes/Thrall Hughes Thrall 1982
27.   Snortin’ Whisky Pat Travers Band Crash & Burn 1980
28.   Sail Away Deep Purple Burn 1974
30.
31.  SLIDE INTO A SIDE The Who Tommy – Side 1 1969
32.   Overture The Who Tommy
33.   It’s A Boy The Who Tommy
34.   1921 The Who Tommy
35.   Amazing Journey The Who Tommy
36.   Sparks The Who Tommy
37.   The Hawker The Who Tommy
38.   Rocket In My Pocket Little Feat Time Loves A Hero 1977
39.   Salty Candy/Trying To Stay ‘Live Leon Russell & Marc Benno Asylum Choir II 1971
40.   Long Cool Woman In A Black Dress The Hollies Greatest Hits
41.   Sexy Sadie The Beatles White Album 1968
42.   Narnia Steve Hackett Please Don’t Touch 1978
43.   Closet Chronicles Kansas Point Of No Return 1977
44.   Drag Bones Kiev Falling Bough Wisdom Teach 2014
45.   Signify Porcupine Tree Signify 1996
46.  SET OF BLUES
47.   We Gonna Rock Taj Mahal, Elvin Bishop, Boz Scaggs & Friends Fillmore-The Last Days 1972
48.   Let The Good Times Roll Koko Taylor & Her Blues Machine An Audience With The Queen 1987
49.   Yer Blues Kenny Wayne Shepherd How I Go 2011
50.   I Can’t Quit You Babe Led Zeppelin Led Zeppelin 1969
51.   Lazarus David Bowie Blackstar 2016
52.   Tightrope Electric Light Orchestra A New World Record 1976
53.   Gone Hollywood Supertramp Breakfast In America 1979
54.   Love Is The Key Ray Thomas From Mighty Oaks 1976
55.   White Bird It’s A Beautiful Day It’s A Beautiful Day 1969
56.   Cathedral Crosby Stills & Nash CSN 1977
57.   Bright White Shawn Phillips Bright White 1973
This news story was originally published here: http://theprogressiveaspect.net/blog/2018/01/21/mimi-schell-heliodor/

I have been a fan of the voice and music of Hamburg’s Miriam “Mimi” Schell since first hearing her on the 2001 Force of Gravity album from German band Sylvan where she sang Midnight Sun an absolutely spectacular duet with Marco Glühmann.

Now, Mimi has returned to create her own first album, Heliodor. The album was produced by Ken Stringfellow (The Posies, R.E.M., Big Star) who also creates a wonderful dreamscape of music, playing all the instruments. The album was recorded throughout the world, in Paris, Tours, Hamburg, Hannover, Cologne. Rotterdam and Medford, U.S.A. 

With a title derived from the Greek “gift of the sun” – a lemon-yellow gemstone – Mimi describes Heliodor as a concept album about “love and all its various facets: romantic, dangerous, fragile, rebellious, utopian, twisted, universal and eternal… The love for each other and the love within us. The album title appeared to me in my dreams. This album, which so many people believed in and worked on, now really seems like a manifestation of the sun’s gift to me”.

Heliodor is the most unique album release you will witness this or any year. It comes to you in the shape of a handcrafted book scroll. When completely unrolled, the work of art is ten meters long. It is the world’s longest and probably most unusual record cover. The music itself is enclosed in a personal download code that comes with each hand numbered and signed book scroll.

[embedded content]

This Love Is a Monster boldly opens Heliodor, with jarring drums and symphonic splendour, before Mimi’s country sounding voice sings, “I would do it again”, despite the difficulties love sometimes brings. This is a powerful opening song about living life and love to its fullest. Don’t hold back let it flow. A great kick off track.

Drawn to Your Light sounds like a spring or summer song, perfect for being down by the lake or the ocean. It really takes another step up when Mimi changes tempo and harmony and sings, “Some people falter, afraid to alter. Waiting for a moment in time”, full of more emotional feeling than most songs I have heard, the sound taking me back to classic music I remember from my youth. I think Mimi is saying, don’t wait. Make it happen when the fire is there. Don’t be afraid to express your love.

Passing the Monuments is a regal inspiration, full of deep keyboards and electronic wizardry. Mimi’s lyrics do an excellent job of describing the need for more communication and understanding, especially as big moments of life’s important episodes pass us by, like a ride on a train. The world moves past and we need to take notice and enjoy every moment. The “It’s breaktime” pause is a nice reflective moment to help emphasise the importance of the lyrics.

Dive into the river of life and love, sharing information and history as a story shared between a couple. Sharing experiences like we used to before our Internet and cellphone existence. Mimi sings joyfully, “Hey, I’m playful still, don’t make me lose your side. It’s joyful here, don’t make me feel afraid. Are you still there my four-leaf clover?” Do It with Love opens with great keyboards and organ that reminds me of the opening of Candlebox’s Breathe Me In… and that’s a good thing. But then it’s all Mimi Schell. Her expressive lyrics and the wonderful melody and music make this one the best songs on an album of favourites. Schell opens singing, “When you perceive. When you explore. When you take course. When you rise up. When you achieve. When you pass on. Remember to do it with love”. An anthem for our times, the lyrics on this track are the best on the album. Later Mimi sings, “We’re all straining in the water. We’re all heading for the wild blue yonder.”

Why So Afraid is a country stomper, full of charm and grind. Mimi sings, “Gotta learn to be patient. In a wide-open space. Gotta learn to be playful. It will turn out your way.” Slow down and stop for a moment in the fast paced world we all live in. Shiny Boxes is slower paced, acoustic and electric guitars driving the mood, supported well with orchestrated strings and a magnificent surrounding soundscape. Another of my favourites, Schell’s vocals and lyrics are perfect on this track.

Can You Feel It is an optimistic look at a world coming together. The Jackson’s penned this great song years ago, and it stuck well with Mimi as it has with many since. This is another anthemic song of unity we all need. Powerful, like some of the great unity songs we all remember from the 1960s.

We don’t have to wait for God’s Reply. Learning to live beyond and despite material things. A great message delivered with inspirational music. The acoustic closer, The Tower, is another wonderful and inspirational song. An almost Blackbird rhythm opens the track with acoustic guitar and Mimi singing, describing an ethereal place. “Heaven reveal your love, there is still hope on this Earth. Full of wonders”. Thank you, Mimi.

This is Mimi’s masterpiece, and she is sharing it with all of you. Some people wait a lifetime to create their masterpiece. The scroll is written with care and love and the illustrations within provide a vision of a life fulfilled, even at such an early age.

I am finishing this review on Mimi’s birthday. Please get this for her… and for you. The inspiring music within, and the illustrations provided in the scroll, will give you something to reflect on all this hopeful new year.

TRACK LISTING
01. This Love Is a Monster (3:22)
02. Drawn to Your Light (3:26)
03. Passing the Monuments (3:18)
04. Dive (3:36)
05. Do It with Love (4:57)
06. Why So Afraid (3:42)
07. Shiny Boxes (4:01)
08. Can You Feel It (4:08)
09. God’s Reply (2:56)
10. The Tower (3:41)

Total Time – 37:07

MUSICIANS
Mimi Schell – Vocals
Ken Stringfellow – All Instruments

ADITIONAL INFO
Record Label: Independent
Country of Origin: Germany
Date of Release : 23rd November 2017

LINKS
Mimi Schell – Website | Facebook | Bandcamp

Tags:

Related Posts

No related posts found!


This news story was originally published here: http://theprogressiveaspect.net/blog/2018/01/20/cosmograf-when-age-has-done-its-duty-2018-remix/

Strange as it may seem memories are not permanent and immutable. We define ourselves by memories, which can be triggered by the seemingly most trivial or incidental of thoughts, such as smells or sounds, and yet the mundane can carry such power. Over the years our minds refine, embellish and adjust elements of our recollections which are filtered through our changing experiences and emotions.

We all look back and sometimes think ‘What if…?’ or ‘I wish I’d done it this way, not that way’, but we very rarely have the chance to do anything about it. That’s exactly what Robin Armstrong has done with this remixed and partially re-recorded version of his first significant release, When Age Has Done Its Duty originally released in 2011, which evocatively explored personal memories. Seven years later, and appropriately for an album concerned with memories, he has repackaged the album in a new remixed version which has undergone a similar journey of transformation as Robin has taken the opportunity to re-record significant portions of the guitar, bass and vocal parts, and add new string arrangements, looking back to ensure that his art is preserved and presented in the best possible way.

As an album that has not been available in physical format for some time, and is well sought after by newer fans, the Cosmograf mainman has taken the opportunity to not just remaster the album, but to improve and ‘polish up’ aspects of it with which he was not totally satisfied. This indicates the attention to detail and drive for musical improvement that imbues Armstrong’s art. It is also a mark of his development as a singer and musician that in the intervening period since 2011 he has reached even higher standards of performance and production.

It is perhaps appropriate that this re-release follows last year’s outstanding The Hay-Man Dreams, steeped in a sense of the countryside and family, as they share the same musical and lyrical DNA. Both inspired by family history, they possess a very real sense of the personal, filled with poignant emotions.

[embedded content]

Since 2011 Robin Armstrong has built up a steadily increasing following and reputation with impeccably produced and imaginative albums, ranging from the Sci-Fi survival story The Man Left in Space to the Gothic spiritualism of Capacitor, and the cinematic alien abduction/paranoia of The Unreasonable Silence. They are all outstanding in their own way, but for some Cosmograf fans When Age Has Done Its Duty is where it all started, and it is still Robin Armstrong’s most personal album, based on his experiences as a boy, visiting his mother’s family in Shropshire. This connection gives the album an extra resonance, and, such is Armstrong’s songwriting and performing ability, there is a very real sense of the texture and ‘feel’ of his childhood. The music is imbued with an earthiness and atmosphere redolent of his relatives rural pastimes. This is particularly highlighted on Blacksmith’s Hammer, about his Uncle Harry where you almost feel like you’re in the Smithy watching a man at his trade. Similarly, Armstrong finely crafts memorable melodies and evocative lyrics throughout the album:

“Sat Back from his work, he drew his last breath,
The sound of the Hammer, fell quiet at his death.”

In addition to re-fashioning the music Armstrong has also taken the opportunity to provide fascinating booklet notes with background information and insights into the songs. These include the rather heart-breaking detail that those final lines above from Blacksmith’s Hammer were based on the actual passing of Uncle Harry, who literally sat back from shoeing a horse and drew his last breath. Such insights add extra emotional impact for the listener to an already touching song. They are also a great incentive for anyone who already has this album and may be wondering whether it is worth getting the re-release – reading the stories behind these songs and the concept of the album greatly adds to its enjoyment and appreciation.

Some songs on this re-release have had more changes than others. For example On Which We Stand has clearly had considerable work done to improve it – not that it was too shabby in the first place! Simon Rogers’ beautifully played 12-string guitar is brought much more to the fore in the mix, rather than being somewhat overwhelmed by the organ on the original version. Later in the song a more powerful Mellotron and bass pedals have been added to Simon’s finale guitar solo to increase the sense of drama. The bass guitar has also been re-recorded, along with the whole lead vocal performance. The album was very good already – Armstrong has simply made it even better.

Robin Armstrong’s vocals have developed remarkably over the years, and whereas he used to rely on some guest vocalists, he is now confident enough to sing all the vocals in his own inimitable style, as on The Hay-Man Dreams. The atmospheric On Which We Stand benefits from a more mature and assured re-recorded vocal performance from Armstrong. Nevertheless, his choice of guest vocalists also showed impeccable taste and touch as his chosen artists really imprinted their own distinctive character onto their contributions. Tom O’Bedlam’s elegiac recitation of Matthew Arnold’s ‘Growing Old’ poem, over a delicate Supertramp-like piano, is a perfectly judged intro which is then emotively taken up by Steve Thorne’s fine voice on the title track. The vocal contribution of Huw Lloyd-Jones (Midnight Sun) on Memory Lost is absolutely outstanding, displaying a remarkable range and emotional connection with a song which has resonated with many listeners.

There will be some listeners who have not heard this Cosmograf album, or indeed any other Cosmograf album, and so trying to identify where the artist has added or improved on the original version will be pointless for them.

The real question for new listeners is whether it is worth starting their Cosmograf journey with this album?

The answer is most definitely: ‘Yes’

[embedded content]

If new listeners need any incentive to delve into this new musical world then perhaps they should sample the dramatic Bakelite Switch, which commences with the sounds of a brass band, a dog barking and then Armstrong’s attempt to replicate the unique ‘clunk’ of an old fashioned Bakelite light switch, which used to resound around his Uncle and Aunt’s house – strange how one little sound can transport us back instantly to places long gone. What follows is an outstanding rock song full of dramatic passages, sound effects, superb vocals and pulsating performances, including Bob Dalton (It Bites) on drums and an ululating and unique guest guitar solo from the very talented Luke Machin (The Tangent / Maschine). The lyrics are filled with nostalgic images of Robin’s childhood in the old cottage, including absorbing the music of that era which has clearly left such a mark on the song writer.

Some albums have an emotional connection with us, and this is very much the case for myself as I associate it with my own father’s decline into dementia and eventual death in 2014. I could not listen to this album for some time – it was just too close. Nearly four years on this re-release has allowed a re-connection with the album, and in some ways brings back other personal memories. Armstrong reveals that many assumed Memory Lost was about dementia, which he understands as many of us have experienced the decline and loss of a loved one. It is about the sadness of his Aunt left alone after losing her husband and trying to hang onto memories of him. Memories fade so Cosmograf sought to capture the details, those little bits of the story which evoke so much (like the simple sound of a light switch), so that they are not lost in time. Robin Armstrong has preserved those moments resplendently, and has now taken those musical memories out of the box and polished them up beautifully for posterity. Don’t we all do that sometimes? Telling stories about those that have gone, anecdotes that develop over time and become embellished or slightly changed with each telling. For some those stories are new and interesting, and for others they just love hearing them all over again.

“When age has done its duty, what remains is memory, Etched in glass on me.”

Robin Armstrong has etched his musical memories in the grooves of this remarkable and touching record with imagination and precision. If you’ve got it, hear and read those stories again with added quality and depth. If you haven’t then I strongly suggest getting it now – you won’t forget it!

TRACK LISTING
01. Into This World (11:16)
02. Blacksmith’s Hammer (5:03)
03. On Which We Stand (9:28)
04. Bakelite Switch (7:36)
05. Memory Lost (7:03)
06. When Age Has Done Its Duty (13:04)
07. White Light Awaits (5:49)
08. Dog On The Clee (3:30)

Total Time – 62:49

MUSICIANS
Robin Armstrong – Vocals, Electric, Acoustic & Classical Guitars, Piano, Keyboards, Bass, Backing Vocals
Bob Dalton – Drums (tracks 1,2,3,4,5, & 6)
~ With:
Simon Rogers – 12-string & Electric Guitars (track 3)
Luke Machin – Electric Guitar Solo (track 4)
Huw Lloyd-Jones – Vocals (track 5)
Steve Thorne – Vocals & Backing Vocals (track 6)
Tom O’Bedlam – ‘Growing Old’ Recital  (track 6)
Lee Abraham – Guitars & Bass (track 7)
Dave Ware – Drums (track 7)

ADDITIONAL INFO
Record Label: Independent
Country of Origin: U.K.
Date of Release: 26th January 2018 (Originally Released 1st November 2011)

DISCOGRAPHY
– The Hay-Man Dreams (2017)
– The Unreasonable Silence (2016)
– Capacitor (2014)
– The Man Left In Space (2013)
– When Age has Done It’s Duty (Original Version) (2011)
– End Of Ecclesia (2009) – (Digital Download only)
– Freed From The Anguish (Demo) (2008) – (No Longer Available)

LINKS
Cosmograf – Website | Facebook | Bandcamp

Tags:



This news story was originally published here: http://www.prog-sphere.com/specials/rush-is-over/
Top 5 Acoustic Songs by RUSH

Guitarist Alex Lifeson shared an update on the current status of Rush and his endeavors outside the group, explaining to The Globe and Mail:

It’s been a little over two years since Rush last toured. We have no plans to tour or record any more. We’re basically done. After 41 years, we felt it was enough.

Focusing on the stuff he’s been doing outside Rush, Alex noted:

But I’ve actually been busier lately than I have been in a while. I’m writing a lot. I’m writing on four or five different little projects. I get these requests to do guitar work with other people.

It’s really a lot of fun for me. It’s low pressure: I get to be as creative as I want to be and I can work a little outside of the box, which is really attractive to me.

I’m also writing for the West End Phoenix, a new monthly newspaper in Toronto. [Editor-in-chief and author and a founding member of the Rheostatics] Dave Bidini came to me and asked me if I’d wanted to have fun with a little column, and have artist Casey McGlynn do illustrations for it. It’s been great. Casey‘s illustrations work really well together with what I’m writing.

For my first column, though, I was panicking. I thought, ‘What am I going to do? What can I do that’s going to be funny or different or special in some way?’ So, initially I wasn’t sure about it. This is not my field. But Dave’s a persuasive guy. He told me to write 150 words, that Casey would do his illustrations and that it would be great. I think I submitted 1,200 words. Apparently, I don’t have a problem with content.

It’s fun to put yourself in an uncomfortable situation. If you have a little bit of confidence and you just get out of your own way, these things can happen. The same thing happened when I got asked to do a small role in a TV show, Crawford, a new comedy on CBC from Mike Clattenburg, who created Trailer Park Boys.

I thought I couldn’t do it – that it was something for real actors. But I ended up doing a few episodes. It definitely was not in my comfort zone. But if you throw a challenge at yourself and dive into it, it can be really gratifying.

This news story was originally published here: https://www.prog-sphere.com/specials/rush-is-over/
Top 5 Acoustic Songs by RUSH

Guitarist Alex Lifeson shared an update on the current status of Rush and his endeavors outside the group, explaining to The Globe and Mail:

It’s been a little over two years since Rush last toured. We have no plans to tour or record any more. We’re basically done. After 41 years, we felt it was enough.

Focusing on the stuff he’s been doing outside Rush, Alex noted:

But I’ve actually been busier lately than I have been in a while. I’m writing a lot. I’m writing on four or five different little projects. I get these requests to do guitar work with other people.

It’s really a lot of fun for me. It’s low pressure: I get to be as creative as I want to be and I can work a little outside of the box, which is really attractive to me.

I’m also writing for the West End Phoenix, a new monthly newspaper in Toronto. [Editor-in-chief and author and a founding member of the Rheostatics] Dave Bidini came to me and asked me if I’d wanted to have fun with a little column, and have artist Casey McGlynn do illustrations for it. It’s been great. Casey‘s illustrations work really well together with what I’m writing.

For my first column, though, I was panicking. I thought, ‘What am I going to do? What can I do that’s going to be funny or different or special in some way?’ So, initially I wasn’t sure about it. This is not my field. But Dave’s a persuasive guy. He told me to write 150 words, that Casey would do his illustrations and that it would be great. I think I submitted 1,200 words. Apparently, I don’t have a problem with content.

It’s fun to put yourself in an uncomfortable situation. If you have a little bit of confidence and you just get out of your own way, these things can happen. The same thing happened when I got asked to do a small role in a TV show, Crawford, a new comedy on CBC from Mike Clattenburg, who created Trailer Park Boys.

I thought I couldn’t do it – that it was something for real actors. But I ended up doing a few episodes. It definitely was not in my comfort zone. But if you throw a challenge at yourself and dive into it, it can be really gratifying.