Proving that prog isn't just for dinosaurs!

I’m delighted to announce that the podcast for edition 315 of Live From Progzilla Towers is now available.

In this edition we heard the following music:

  • The Vintage Caravan – On The Run
  • Blank Manuskript – Overture
  • Crystal Beth – Push Thru
  • Marillion – Beautiful (2019 Michael Hunter Remix)
  • Stackridge – Syracuse The Elephant
  • Tame Impala – It Might Be Time
  • Life In Digital – Karma
  • Brian Eno – Blank Frank
  • Kurt Elling – Matte Kudasai
  • Nick Beggs – The Night Porter
  • Voyager IV – Talk To The Wind
  • The Flower Kings – Steampunk
  • Birdeatsbaby – The World Conspires
  • Kenso – Mediterranean And Aryan
  • Tangerine Dream – Song Of The Whale
  • Thieves’ Kitchen – Eilmer
  • Yes – I’ve Seen All Good People (Remix)
  • We Lost The Sea – Parting Ways
  • No-Man – Love You To Bits
  • Tears For Fears – Listen

iTunes/iPod users*: Just search for ‘Progzilla’ or subscribe to: http://www.progzilla.com/media/podcasts/podcast.xml

Enjoy!

This news story was originally published here: https://www.prog-sphere.com/interviews/strange-conversations-interview/

Strange Conversations is a progressive rock project by two brothers, Joseph and Jeremy Haynes, who has recently completed work on their new concept album entitled ‘Blase’ Faire.’ The band took a part on our recent Progotronics sampler, and we talked with them about the new release, the message they want to portray with it, and more.

Define the mission of Strange Conversations. 

Growing up in the same house, we were both always super musical. From Saturday night jam sessions on a 1st-generation electronic drum kit and keyboard together,  to writing songs, there was always something musical going on. When we decided to finally do a “real band”, we knew we wanted to take the varied musical influences we shared, Motown, prog rock, piano pop, metal, and everything in between and layer them on top of the 70s, 80s and 90s sounds we grew up on and write accessible, intelligent , deeply personal songs. “Prog without the pretense” is a phrase we use sometimes, We believe that It is possible to write smart and thoughtful “progressive” music without a lot of instrumental “noodling”. Don’t get me wrong, we love a good 20 minute epic, and we have our own 12 minute piano prog “epic” on this album, but we also love a nice concise rock song!

Tell me about the creative process that informed your upcoming album “Blase’ Faire” and the themes it captures.

We developed the music and lyrics for this album through the magic of technology living 1000 miles apart. We would write some on our own but deliberated obsessively to ensure that neither of us were ten steps behind or ten steps ahead. Beyond one trip that Joe took to Jeremy’s recording studio in New Hampshire, everything came together through the wonders of online conferencing programs and file sharing resources.

From growing to find acceptance in our father’s death, to the rollercoaster of personal success and failures, the thematic structure of this album truly focused on emotions – the good, the bad, the twists, the turns – the ever-revolving ferris wheel at the center of the circus that is life.

Strange Conversations - Blase' Faire

What is the message you are trying to give with “Blase’ Faire”? 

Simply said, take the ride of life not with the expectation that you know exactly what’s going to come next, but rather with an open mind that lets you see things differently with each experience.

How did you document the music while it was being formulated?

Because our lives aren’t very stationary, a lot of ideas and concepts came on the go. Because of that, mobile devices were a major player. Often times, on my lunch break from work, I would sit in my car and write on my phone – saving every word that came to mind in a Google Doc that was exclusively reserved for Strange Conversations. So that we could constantly play show and tell with one another all the while being as far away from each other as we were, we would share the document so that everything was always available for us to observe and modify on the fly.

I would also use audio-recording programs to trap vocal melodies for songs and save them in the same document – as well as different stages of mixes for each song so that we always knew exactly where we stopped and where we needed to begin.

Is the dynamic flow of the pieces carefully architected?

Without question. We are perfectionists and audiophiles at heart. We made it a point to make sure that every single word in every single song had its purpose and place – and the same goes for the music. Everything on this album had an organic recipe to it. If we were unhappy with what came out of the oven, we scrapped it and rewrote the recipe until it was something that we could digest over and over again until the end result was nothing but pure satisfaction.

Describe the approach to recording the album.

Evolution. After our first album, “Teaching Me To Fish”, was released, we focused on evolving to the next place. With the first record being a parallel circuit – about Ernest Hemingway’s “Old Man and The Sea” and how it connects with our late father, his life, and our experiences with him – we wanted to further develop each track on this record so that they had their own natural identity. Going back to the theme of emotions, every song has something unique to take from it – depending upon the person that listens to it.

How long “Blase’ Faire” was in the making?

We released the first album at the end of 2018 and spent a few months letting it marinate – marketing it and essentially basking in accomplishment. There was no greater feeling than seeing that album turn from words on paper to what it became. That was a high that neither of us felt before and one that we wanted again, so we right back into writing mode at the end of February and started to put those ideas into writing in March. We have since wrapped up the writing and recording and are in the final mixing/mastering stages with an official November release. In all, it took us close to a year to finalize this one.

Which bands or artists influenced your work on the release?

Everything from Faith No More, to 90′s rock bands like Gin Blossoms and Jellyfish, to The Beatles and The Beach Boys, to Spock’s Beard, and even singer/songwriters like Jason Mraz and A Great Big World. We are not wired to conform to one specific style of music because there’s great things to showcase in all genres – and this album is no exception to that rule.

What is your view on technology in music?

It’s vital for a long-distance concept like Strange Conversations; flying from Georgia to New Hampshire, vice versa, or even meeting in between is just an ideal concept that we have the means to consistently pursue. Therefore, technology acts like the adhesive that keeps everything together. I don’t think we would have lifted this off as smoothly without the internet, mobile devices, and computers to aid us in doing so.

Do you see your music as serving a purpose beyond music?

Yes, but I see all music serving a purpose beyond music. I see our music hopefully influencing others to create, take risks to do what they want to do in this life. I hope to see our music help others feel things when they think it’s wrong or untimely to do so.

What are your plans for the future?

Much like our plans were after releasing the first album – to evolve. I am already tinkering with ideas for the third album  – as is Jeremy – because this was a band born from passion for music. Passions never die. If anything, they continue to move forward towards the next destination. The beautiful thing about the destination is that it doesn’t exist yet. It’s a place that we will create from foundation up, meticulously with no other purpose but to find that same level of satisfaction again.

For more about Strange Conversations visit their website, and follow them on Facebook and Instagram.

The post STRANGE CONVERSATIONS: Prog Without the Pretense appeared first on Prog Sphere.

This news story was originally published here: http://www.prog-sphere.com/interviews/strange-conversations-interview/

Strange Conversations is a progressive rock project by two brothers, Joseph and Jeremy Haynes, who has recently completed work on their new concept album entitled ‘Blase’ Faire.’ The band took a part on our recent Progotronics sampler, and we talked with them about the new release, the message they want to portray with it, and more.

Define the mission of Strange Conversations. 

Growing up in the same house, we were both always super musical. From Saturday night jam sessions on a 1st-generation electronic drum kit and keyboard together,  to writing songs, there was always something musical going on. When we decided to finally do a “real band”, we knew we wanted to take the varied musical influences we shared, Motown, prog rock, piano pop, metal, and everything in between and layer them on top of the 70s, 80s and 90s sounds we grew up on and write accessible, intelligent , deeply personal songs. “Prog without the pretense” is a phrase we use sometimes, We believe that It is possible to write smart and thoughtful “progressive” music without a lot of instrumental “noodling”. Don’t get me wrong, we love a good 20 minute epic, and we have our own 12 minute piano prog “epic” on this album, but we also love a nice concise rock song!

Tell me about the creative process that informed your upcoming album “Blase’ Faire” and the themes it captures.

We developed the music and lyrics for this album through the magic of technology living 1000 miles apart. We would write some on our own but deliberated obsessively to ensure that neither of us were ten steps behind or ten steps ahead. Beyond one trip that Joe took to Jeremy’s recording studio in New Hampshire, everything came together through the wonders of online conferencing programs and file sharing resources.

From growing to find acceptance in our father’s death, to the rollercoaster of personal success and failures, the thematic structure of this album truly focused on emotions – the good, the bad, the twists, the turns – the ever-revolving ferris wheel at the center of the circus that is life.

Strange Conversations - Blase' Faire

What is the message you are trying to give with “Blase’ Faire”? 

Simply said, take the ride of life not with the expectation that you know exactly what’s going to come next, but rather with an open mind that lets you see things differently with each experience.

How did you document the music while it was being formulated?

Because our lives aren’t very stationary, a lot of ideas and concepts came on the go. Because of that, mobile devices were a major player. Often times, on my lunch break from work, I would sit in my car and write on my phone – saving every word that came to mind in a Google Doc that was exclusively reserved for Strange Conversations. So that we could constantly play show and tell with one another all the while being as far away from each other as we were, we would share the document so that everything was always available for us to observe and modify on the fly.

I would also use audio-recording programs to trap vocal melodies for songs and save them in the same document – as well as different stages of mixes for each song so that we always knew exactly where we stopped and where we needed to begin.

Is the dynamic flow of the pieces carefully architected?

Without question. We are perfectionists and audiophiles at heart. We made it a point to make sure that every single word in every single song had its purpose and place – and the same goes for the music. Everything on this album had an organic recipe to it. If we were unhappy with what came out of the oven, we scrapped it and rewrote the recipe until it was something that we could digest over and over again until the end result was nothing but pure satisfaction.

Describe the approach to recording the album.

Evolution. After our first album, “Teaching Me To Fish”, was released, we focused on evolving to the next place. With the first record being a parallel circuit – about Ernest Hemingway’s “Old Man and The Sea” and how it connects with our late father, his life, and our experiences with him – we wanted to further develop each track on this record so that they had their own natural identity. Going back to the theme of emotions, every song has something unique to take from it – depending upon the person that listens to it.

How long “Blase’ Faire” was in the making?

We released the first album at the end of 2018 and spent a few months letting it marinate – marketing it and essentially basking in accomplishment. There was no greater feeling than seeing that album turn from words on paper to what it became. That was a high that neither of us felt before and one that we wanted again, so we right back into writing mode at the end of February and started to put those ideas into writing in March. We have since wrapped up the writing and recording and are in the final mixing/mastering stages with an official November release. In all, it took us close to a year to finalize this one.

Which bands or artists influenced your work on the release?

Everything from Faith No More, to 90′s rock bands like Gin Blossoms and Jellyfish, to The Beatles and The Beach Boys, to Spock’s Beard, and even singer/songwriters like Jason Mraz and A Great Big World. We are not wired to conform to one specific style of music because there’s great things to showcase in all genres – and this album is no exception to that rule.

What is your view on technology in music?

It’s vital for a long-distance concept like Strange Conversations; flying from Georgia to New Hampshire, vice versa, or even meeting in between is just an ideal concept that we have the means to consistently pursue. Therefore, technology acts like the adhesive that keeps everything together. I don’t think we would have lifted this off as smoothly without the internet, mobile devices, and computers to aid us in doing so.

Do you see your music as serving a purpose beyond music?

Yes, but I see all music serving a purpose beyond music. I see our music hopefully influencing others to create, take risks to do what they want to do in this life. I hope to see our music help others feel things when they think it’s wrong or untimely to do so.

What are your plans for the future?

Much like our plans were after releasing the first album – to evolve. I am already tinkering with ideas for the third album  – as is Jeremy – because this was a band born from passion for music. Passions never die. If anything, they continue to move forward towards the next destination. The beautiful thing about the destination is that it doesn’t exist yet. It’s a place that we will create from foundation up, meticulously with no other purpose but to find that same level of satisfaction again.

For more about Strange Conversations visit their website, and follow them on Facebook and Instagram.

The post STRANGE CONVERSATIONS: Prog Without the Pretense appeared first on Prog Sphere.

This news story was originally published here: https://www.prog-sphere.com/news/enslaved-royskopp-cover/

There is ample reason to celebrate: Enslaved have once again joined forces with Nuclear Blast, to spread the music of the Norwegian avant-garde metallers all around the globe. With that, band and label renew a collaboration that has been ongoing for around ten years and two years ago produced the universally lauded album E.

Band founding member and guitarist Ivar Bjornson stated about the re-signing:

It is with great pleasure we re-sign our record deal with Nuclear Blast worldwide! We have been working together for more or less a decade, and it has been an individed positive experience. They have both the heart to grasp our musical visions, and the business-muscles to spread them out into the world. When you add personal friendships with the wonderful people in America, U.K. and Germany it is simply an ideal situation for us to be in. Onwards, forwards and in all directions!

To mark the occasion, Enslaved present a stunning new music video filled with atmospheric imaginery for their interpretation of ”What Else is There“ by Norwegian electropop band Röyskopp. The song is featured as a bonus track on the digipack CD and digital version of their latest album, E.

Watch and listen below.

The post ENSLAVED Release Video for Cover of RÖYSKOPP’s “What Else is There” appeared first on Prog Sphere.

This news story was originally published here: http://www.prog-sphere.com/news/enslaved-royskopp-cover/

There is ample reason to celebrate: Enslaved have once again joined forces with Nuclear Blast, to spread the music of the Norwegian avant-garde metallers all around the globe. With that, band and label renew a collaboration that has been ongoing for around ten years and two years ago produced the universally lauded album E.

Band founding member and guitarist Ivar Bjornson stated about the re-signing:

It is with great pleasure we re-sign our record deal with Nuclear Blast worldwide! We have been working together for more or less a decade, and it has been an individed positive experience. They have both the heart to grasp our musical visions, and the business-muscles to spread them out into the world. When you add personal friendships with the wonderful people in America, U.K. and Germany it is simply an ideal situation for us to be in. Onwards, forwards and in all directions!

To mark the occasion, Enslaved present a stunning new music video filled with atmospheric imaginery for their interpretation of ”What Else is There“ by Norwegian electropop band Röyskopp. The song is featured as a bonus track on the digipack CD and digital version of their latest album, E.

Watch and listen below.

The post ENSLAVED Release Cover of RÖYSKOPP’s “What Else is There” appeared first on Prog Sphere.

This news story was originally published here: https://www.prog-sphere.com/news/mike-portnoy-on-liquid-tension-experiment/

Mike Portnoy says that his Liquid Tension Experiment instrumental project was “like Dream Theater without annoying vocals.

The ex-Dream Theater drummer made the comment during an appearance on the Brazilian radio show ”Bem Que Se Kiss” (via Rádio Kiss FM 92,5) which was livestreamed via the program’s Facebook page.

According to DreamTheaterForums.orgPortnoy and the show’s host were discussing Liquid Tension Experiment when the host stated about the project (see video below): “I think Tension was good. But the problem is the language.“ Portnoy responded: “But that’s what made it good. [It was] like Dream Theater without annoying vocals. It was perfect.

After everyone in the room started laughing, Portnoy added: “But we’re not on the air, right?” To which the host responded: “Yes, we are, actually.“ Mike then went on to say: “Are we?” and cracked up laughing.

Portnoy, who co-founded Dream Theater nearly 35 years ago, abruptly quit the band in September 2010 while on tour with Avenged Sevenfold. He has since been replaced by Mike Mangini (Annihilator, Extreme, James Labrie, Steve Vai).

Dream Theater singer James LaBrie has previously ruled out the possibility of a reunion with Portnoy, saying that Mangini ”will be our drummer until the day that we finish doing this.

Mike is in the middle of a Brazilian tour with the local metal band Noturnall, which also features in its ranks Mike‘s former Adrenaline Mob bandmate, guitarist Mike Orlando.

The post MIKE PORTNOY: “LIQUID TENSION EXPERIMENT Was Like DREAM THEATER Without Annoying Vocals” appeared first on Prog Sphere.

This news story was originally published here: http://www.prog-sphere.com/news/mike-portnoy-on-liquid-tension-experiment/

Mike Portnoy says that his Liquid Tension Experiment instrumental project was “like Dream Theater without annoying vocals.

The ex-Dream Theater drummer made the comment during an appearance on the Brazilian radio show ”Bem Que Se Kiss” (via Rádio Kiss FM 92,5) which was livestreamed via the program’s Facebook page.

According to DreamTheaterForums.orgPortnoy and the show’s host were discussing Liquid Tension Experiment when the host stated about the project (see video below): “I think Tension was good. But the problem is the language.“ Portnoy responded: “But that’s what made it good. [It was] like Dream Theater without annoying vocals. It was perfect.

After everyone in the room started laughing, Portnoy added: “But we’re not on the air, right?” To which the host responded: “Yes, we are, actually.“ Mike then went on to say: “Are we?” and cracked up laughing.

Portnoy, who co-founded Dream Theater nearly 35 years ago, abruptly quit the band in September 2010 while on tour with Avenged Sevenfold. He has since been replaced by Mike Mangini (Annihilator, Extreme, James Labrie, Steve Vai).

Dream Theater singer James LaBrie has previously ruled out the possibility of a reunion with Portnoy, saying that Mangini ”will be our drummer until the day that we finish doing this.

Mike is in the middle of a Brazilian tour with the local metal band Noturnall, which also features in its ranks Mike‘s former Adrenaline Mob bandmate, guitarist Mike Orlando.

The post MIKE PORTNOY: “LIQUID TENSION EXPERIMENT Was Like DREAM THEATER Without Annoying Vocals” appeared first on Prog Sphere.

THE PROGRESSIVE TRACKS SHOW #338
(Veterans/Remembrance/Armistice Day – 2019)

Whether you call it Veterans Day, Remembrance Day or Armistice day… It’s time once again to remember and honor our military, with a ‘think for yourself’ show (there may be a hint of current events as well).

Music with a message!

PLAYLIST:

If you have comments or suggestions for show topics/ music (always welcome), feel free to contact me any time via email:  ProgTracks@KPTZ.org

And remember, you can access podcasts of any previous Progressive Tracks Show at: http://www.progzilla.com/?s=progressive+tracks (there are almost 180 podcasts now!).

Most importantly, SUBSCRIBE TO THE PODCAST below, so you’ll have it delivered to your fingertips weekly! ˅˅˅˅˅˅˅˅

KRAZZ LOFT VINYL SHOW

Broadcast 10th November 2019

1.    Overture The Who
2.    Mad Jack Baker/Gurvitz Army
3.    The Great Salt Lake Band Of Horses
4.    Halfway To The Moon Phish
5.    (I’m A) Roadrunner Fleetwood Mac
6.    Wreckage J Geils Band
7.    Hearts Yes
8.    You Might Recall Genesis
9.    Jigsaw Marillion
A Dog Gone 6-Pack
10. The Dogs Of War Pink Floyd
11. Black Dog Led Zeppelin
12. Hair Of The Dog Nazareth
13. Sick As A Dog Aerosmith
14. Gonna Buy Me A Dog The Monkees
15. The Dog, The Dog, He’s At It Again Caravan
16. Western Waterloo Poco
17. My Back Pages The Byrds
18. Born Under A Bad Sign Rita Coolidge
19. Walk On Chilliwack
20. Madman Across The Water Elton John
21. Death, The Reaper The Enid
SIAS: JOHN BARLEYCORN MUST DIE (sd 2) TRAFFIC
22. Stranger To Himself Traffic
23. John Barleycorn Must Die Traffic
24. Every Mothers Son Traffic
25. That’s The Way Things Are Rubicon
26. Spacerunner Stanley Clarke
27. Good Question Herbie Hancock
28. Lamplight Symphony Kansas
29. If I Had The Time Uriah Heep
30. The Last Ride Todd Rundgren
31. Dark Matter Porcupine Tree w/Steven Wilson
32. In The Wake Of Poseidon (incl. Libra’s Theme) King Crimson
33. Inner City Blues Brian Auger
34. Some Of My Best Friends Are Blues Jimmy Smith
35. People Oscar Peterson Jam
36. That’s All You Need Faces w/Rod Stewart
37. The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down The Band
38. Across The Great Divide The Band
39. Good As It Gets Beth Hart
40. Dreamboat Annie Heart

 

 

If you want to get in touch with Alan about requests or the show please use

Krazzloft@yahoo.com

This news story was originally published here: https://www.prog-sphere.com/specials/top-20-albums-of-2019-prog-sphere/

It’s that time of the year when writers and editors of music publications have the hardest time of going through the pile of albums released throughout the year, just to be met with a proverbial Golgotha by readers complaining how this or that release didn’t make the “best of” list.

2019 is another strong year; the amount of great releases that were put out this year is simply overwhelming, but we made it down to 20 records which in our opinion are the “creme de la creme” and the musical pinnacle of 2019. Many of these records are so far-fetched from each other in terms of musical styles, but as usual we were led by our vision of forward-thinking music.

So here it is… Top 20 albums of 2019 by Prog Sphere

20. CONSIDER THE SOURCE – You Are Literally a Metaphor

Going into this album, I did not expect this at all. Eclectic is definitely the word for this, and so is unique and amazing. As crazy as things get sometimes, it always keeps your interest as you want to hear what happens next. The effects are excellent, the musicianship is out of this world. There are many times throughout this album I was just speechless.

19. LUNAR – Eidolon

As the time in a calendar year passes by, it often happens that many of releases that are launched late in a year are overlooked. Luckily, this was not the case with the second studio album by Sacramento prog metal project Lunar. Inspired by a tragedy that befell the project in the way of loosing guitarist Ryan Erwin, drummer and songwriter Alex Bosson has put his emotions towards honing a release that is as beautiful as angry. Helping him in his vision are guest contributions from members of Haken, Leprous, Thank You Scientist, Fallujah, etc.

18. MONO – Nowhere, Now Here

The addition of electronics to Mono‘s music gave their music the element that is needed to make their music perfect. This album is absolutely amazing and the fact that it is all instrumental except for one track should not scare you away. The music is beautiful as always, almost beyond words. Each track on this album is an experience, full of emotion and expansiveness, the traits that have always existed in Mono‘s music, yet somehow, this time they have even made it better with more dynamics, many times unpredictable this time around.

17. ARCH / MATHEOS – Winter Etheral

Winter Ethereal cranks out nine hard driving prog metal tracks rooted in the previous century but clearly designed for 21st century consumption. A bit longer than the previous one and clocking in at about 108 minutes, this album bursts into the scene with the crushing “Vermillion Moons” which delivers the expected labyrinthine guitar riffs while taking a few breathers with some slower passages. Clearly on display and man of the hour vocalist ARCH shows off his high capacity pipes in an ever daring feat of vocal majesty which never fails throughout the album’s lengthy parade through the progressively imbued compositions that seem to tackle the usual prog metal melodramatic lyrical esoterica in the fullest sonic regalia. Despite the plethora of musicians on board this time, the album comes off as a tightly woven musical experience with all eyes on the prize, that meaning the overall feel of consistency in this high quality musical sector of the prog metal universe.

16. KLONE – Le Grand Voyage

Known for its trademark dark guitar tones and epic brooding soundscapes, Le Grand Voyage is a dynamic and intense album that explores nine unique landscapes, and switches between dark, luminous, heavy and powerful sounds.

15. KAYO DOT – Blasphemy

Kayo Dot is one of the most important avant-prog and experimental bands that is still quite relevant. Blasphemy seems to be the most variant Kayo Dot release. This is one of their best albums to start on if you haven’t heard them before. It gives you a good overall picture of what to expect from the band—that is, the unexpected.

14. MONKEY3 – Sphere

Sphere is an excellent album full of a lot of dynamic, and it is easy to see why this band is so well revered and is also gaining more and more fans all the time. Their concerts are quite amazing and make for a memorable experience. Since this band has been around for quite some time now, they have become quite good at working together, especially when it comes to knowing how to create amazing jam sessions.

13. BENT KNEE – You Know What They Mean

The musicianship, instrumentation  and vocal delivery on You Know What They Mean are stellar; the production is great and the use of dynamics, dissonance and unique styles is all top-notch. I love the fact that the music can easily fool you, thinking at times that you have something that is somewhat “normal” that suddenly and unpredictable becomes totally unhinged. The music is quirky, no doubt, but it is also extremely well done.

12. THE MERCURY TREE – Spidermilk

The instruments on The Mercury Tree’s newest offering were all purposefully tuned to this microtonal scale which give it the unique, yet very nice texture and sound. Spidermilk took two years to create, and much of that time must have been learning the harmonies and perfecting the sound. I know this is definitely not going to be to everyone’s liking, but you can’t deny the sound is unique, challenging and groundbreaking, and above all, 100% progressive.

11. THANK YOU SCIENTIST – Terraformer

An album of this length might be tough for many listeners, especially with the complexity of the music. But, as is the case with most of the best progressive albums, with repeated listenings and as you grow more familiar with the songs, things get better and it no longer seems like so much of an assault on your senses. Even with the lighter, jazzier sound on this album, it can seem like too much on the first few listens. But time and practice will increase your love and appreciation for this amazing album. The music is complex, yes, the album is also very long, and usually that combination can result in exhausting a listener’s head, but this album is put together quite well with the track sequence working for it when you first hear it; and later, as your familiarity with the music grows, it doesn’t come across as so much of a sonic assault.

The post Top 20 Albums of 2019 by Prog Sphere appeared first on Prog Sphere.