ProgSphere News

All posts tagged ProgSphere News

This news story was originally published here: http://www.prog-sphere.com/interviews/infirmum-interview/
Timo Solonen

Infirmum (former Kuolonkoura) is a one-man death/doom metal project from Jyvaskyla in Finland, founded by multi-instrumentalist and composer Timo Solonen. In December 2018 he launched a debut EP and is already working on its full-length follow-up. Solonen spoke for Prog Sphere about the project in the interview below.

Define the mission of Infirmum.

To deliver feelings and thoughts persons may go through in a one single day. Am I successful or not. I hope I am but you can tell me.

Tell me about the creative process that informed your recent EP “Infirmum” and the themes it captures.

What you see and what you hear. What happened globally and caught my eye or something that happened locally. If there was something that make me feel strongly was unfair.

Themes? Well anger could be it. Everything else is developed from that feeling in ”Infirmum”.

What is the message you are trying to give with “Infirmum”?

Honesty. For yourself.

Don’t live life of other’s, make your life to be your own. Never give up. If you make mistakes learn from them don’t pity yourself. Get up and do it better next time. Even if something hits you time after time get up when you have the strength but don’t wait too long. Follow your instincts, you notice sooner or later if you are not doing something what you ”Soul” ”self” want you to do. Can not find better word than ”soul” but it is not meant to be as it is in a religion context. Every song have it’s own story but all songs are connected to each other.

Kuolonkoura

How did you document the music while it was being formulated?

Every time I had a chance, I recorded riffs on my phone. Sometimes riffs just will not go away if I do not record them. Lyrics came much later. It was quite easy to write lyrics in Finnish only problem was try to avoid too aggressive or depressive lyrics. I just tried to find right mood to write.

Is the dynamic flow of the pieces carefully architected?

Not really, I just let everything out and let my guitar tell a story :) To be honest, after I listened what kind of music came through me, I started to think the song as a whole with lyrics. What to add and what to remove. How to capture the feeling and atmosphere I want to express. How something would make the song to tell a story the way I wanted

Sometimes it took day or two or week I had chance to listen riffs or ideas for whole song.

Describe the approach to recording the EP.

This is my first recording, if we don’t count demoes from the beginning of 90’s. There was feeling I have to do this and I still had something to give. Nothing to loose-mentality musically. If I don’t try it I’ll regret it when I am old and sit on my rocking chair.

So I just tried to learn my DAW and ”do my best and see what happens”.

How long “Infirmum” was in the making?

It took less than three months to complete Infirmum. I already had lots of riffs recorded. Lots of time took to program drums and to record some tracks again and again and again. When mixer was satisfied I was quite tired and thought I would never do this again. Next morning I was thinking about new release ;) It was hard school but I am grateful Samu Oittinen at Fantom Studio helped and taught me and had time to answer my stupid questions.

Which bands or artists influenced your work on the release?

Hard to say. I really wasn’t listening any bands or artists when I was composing or writing lyrics. I just listened radio, not metal- or hard rock-channels because I didn’t want to be influenced by any one too much.

Well I bought one David Bowie cd and listened it once, I also bought ”Satanist” and ”I loved you at your darkest” by Behemoth. Those CDs I also listened once. Loved them but I couldn’t listen more to avoid influence. Maybe atmosphere is something I got from Behemoth’s cds.

Other influences I do not know, if there are something it must have been subconscious.

For example, one friend of miner told me one song remind him of a band I even never heard of :)

Timo Solonen (photo: Jouni Schuurman)

Timo Solonen (photo: Jouni Schuurman)

What is your view on technology in music?

Without technology EP would not exist. I recorded songs at home and send files to mixer who mixed and mastered at his studio when he had time.

So most things technology brings to music is positive but too much is too much. If you let technology to be your master in composing and so on, are you really the one who creates your music?

Technology in general is mostly beneficial to human kind. But of course it could do harm in wrong hands. In small scale for example auto-reply is great but also could be with scripts really annoying.

Do you see your music as serving a purpose beyond music?

I want to deliver different kind of feelings from aggression to deep depression and between. Hopefully someone finds comfort from my songs and don’t do stupid things. I also hope people start to think and don’t take everything that is written/told true.

If my songs deliver more good than bad, them I am satisfied.

What are your plans for the future?

First of all I want to finish next album. I hired a session drummer for this album. It is recorded in two parts. Kind of first A-side and then B-side. I’m from old Vinyl LP time. Of course Kuolonkoura, now known as Infirmum, should be proper band as it was meant to be. So hopefully soon there are more than one in this band ;) And perhaps we have chance to play somewhere next summer. I am also designin logo for Infirmum with my friend. Logo should be in a way like me. Simple.

Check out Infirmum on Bandcamp.

Cover photo by Jouni Schuurman

This news story was originally published here: https://www.prog-sphere.com/interviews/infirmum-interview/
Timo Solonen

Infirmum (former Kuolonkoura) is a one-man death/doom metal project from Jyvaskyla in Finland, founded by multi-instrumentalist and composer Timo Solonen. In December 2018 he launched a debut EP and is already working on its full-length follow-up. Solonen spoke for Prog Sphere about the project in the interview below.

Define the mission of Infirmum.

To deliver feelings and thoughts persons may go through in a one single day. Am I successful or not. I hope I am but you can tell me.

Tell me about the creative process that informed your recent EP “Infirmum” and the themes it captures.

What you see and what you hear. What happened globally and caught my eye or something that happened locally. If there was something that make me feel strongly was unfair.

Themes? Well anger could be it. Everything else is developed from that feeling in ”Infirmum”.

What is the message you are trying to give with “Infirmum”?

Honesty. For yourself.

Don’t live life of other’s, make your life to be your own. Never give up. If you make mistakes learn from them don’t pity yourself. Get up and do it better next time. Even if something hits you time after time get up when you have the strength but don’t wait too long. Follow your instincts, you notice sooner or later if you are not doing something what you ”Soul” ”self” want you to do. Can not find better word than ”soul” but it is not meant to be as it is in a religion context. Every song have it’s own story but all songs are connected to each other.

Kuolonkoura

How did you document the music while it was being formulated?

Every time I had a chance, I recorded riffs on my phone. Sometimes riffs just will not go away if I do not record them. Lyrics came much later. It was quite easy to write lyrics in Finnish only problem was try to avoid too aggressive or depressive lyrics. I just tried to find right mood to write.

Is the dynamic flow of the pieces carefully architected?

Not really, I just let everything out and let my guitar tell a story :) To be honest, after I listened what kind of music came through me, I started to think the song as a whole with lyrics. What to add and what to remove. How to capture the feeling and atmosphere I want to express. How something would make the song to tell a story the way I wanted

Sometimes it took day or two or week I had chance to listen riffs or ideas for whole song.

Describe the approach to recording the EP.

This is my first recording, if we don’t count demoes from the beginning of 90’s. There was feeling I have to do this and I still had something to give. Nothing to loose-mentality musically. If I don’t try it I’ll regret it when I am old and sit on my rocking chair.

So I just tried to learn my DAW and ”do my best and see what happens”.

How long “Infirmum” was in the making?

It took less than three months to complete Infirmum. I already had lots of riffs recorded. Lots of time took to program drums and to record some tracks again and again and again. When mixer was satisfied I was quite tired and thought I would never do this again. Next morning I was thinking about new release ;) It was hard school but I am grateful Samu Oittinen at Fantom Studio helped and taught me and had time to answer my stupid questions.

Which bands or artists influenced your work on the release?

Hard to say. I really wasn’t listening any bands or artists when I was composing or writing lyrics. I just listened radio, not metal- or hard rock-channels because I didn’t want to be influenced by any one too much.

Well I bought one David Bowie cd and listened it once, I also bought ”Satanist” and ”I loved you at your darkest” by Behemoth. Those CDs I also listened once. Loved them but I couldn’t listen more to avoid influence. Maybe atmosphere is something I got from Behemoth’s cds.

Other influences I do not know, if there are something it must have been subconscious.

For example, one friend of miner told me one song remind him of a band I even never heard of :)

Timo Solonen (photo: Jouni Schuurman)

Timo Solonen (photo: Jouni Schuurman)

What is your view on technology in music?

Without technology EP would not exist. I recorded songs at home and send files to mixer who mixed and mastered at his studio when he had time.

So most things technology brings to music is positive but too much is too much. If you let technology to be your master in composing and so on, are you really the one who creates your music?

Technology in general is mostly beneficial to human kind. But of course it could do harm in wrong hands. In small scale for example auto-reply is great but also could be with scripts really annoying.

Do you see your music as serving a purpose beyond music?

I want to deliver different kind of feelings from aggression to deep depression and between. Hopefully someone finds comfort from my songs and don’t do stupid things. I also hope people start to think and don’t take everything that is written/told true.

If my songs deliver more good than bad, them I am satisfied.

What are your plans for the future?

First of all I want to finish next album. I hired a session drummer for this album. It is recorded in two parts. Kind of first A-side and then B-side. I’m from old Vinyl LP time. Of course Kuolonkoura, now known as Infirmum, should be proper band as it was meant to be. So hopefully soon there are more than one in this band ;) And perhaps we have chance to play somewhere next summer. I am also designin logo for Infirmum with my friend. Logo should be in a way like me. Simple.

Check out Infirmum on Bandcamp.

Cover photo by Jouni Schuurman

This news story was originally published here: https://www.prog-sphere.com/interviews/umae-interview/
UMÆ Release "Turn Back Time" Single, Feat. John Wesley (Porcupine Tree) and Conner Green (Haken)

Progressive rock trio UMÆ emerged in 2017, and in the early days of January 2019 the band digitally released their debut album ‘Lost in the View’, which sees the core trio comprised of Anthony Cliplef (guitar, vocals), Guðjón Sveinsson (vocals, guitar) and Samy-George Salib (drums) collaborating with number of musicians including John Wesley (Porcupine Tree), Conner Green (Haken), Adam Holzman (Steven Wilson), and Eric Gillette (Neal Morse Band).

The trio answered our questions about the album, inspiration, and more.

Hello! First of all, I’d like to thank you for taking the time to answer this interview. How are you?

Samy: Living the dream.

Anth: Great, thanks. Thank you for having us.

Guðjón: Good, good!

Where did you get your band’s name from?

Anth: The characters are Icelandic, but the name is gibberish. Guðjón and I settled on this gibberish, which is also an inside joke, because it sounded good to us. The cool thing about using a name with no meaning attaches to it is that our band gets to define it entirely by our music.

If you had to describe your band’s sound in short terms, how would you?

Anth: It’s all over the place, but collected, haha.

What are the bands that have inspired you most with regards to your own music?

Anth: For me, Dream Theater, Transatlantic, Yes, Genesis, Rush, King Crimson, Steven Wilson… basically just a whole lot of Prog.

Samy: I’m actually inspired by drummers that have the right balance of emotion and technique, including Steve Gadd,  Gavin Harrison, Todd Sucherman, Charlie Adams and Matt Garstka for example.  This has opened me up to a variety of genres, as they make the drums “sing” and are able to play to the song without “hijacking” it.

Guðjón: I remember sending Anth 4 albums initially when discussing influences for the project; “Act IV” by The Dear Hunter, “Plains of the Purple Buffalo” by shels*, “A Long Time Listening” by Agent Fresco, and “The Tief, the Tide, and the River’s End” by Caligula’s Horse. I’m pretty sure these influences seeped into it, as well as more artists in that vein.

What’s the story behind the formation of UMÆ?

Anth: I met my bandmates for the first time on stage, playing unrehearsed covers of Dream Theater and Steven Wilson songs, down in Florida.

When I got home to Canada, I felt inspired and wanted to do something with the musicians I had played with. So, I sent them some midi programmed demo song files I had made. It wasn’t long before Guðjón got back to me about collaborating on some music.

Guðjón: Before I knew, he was sitting in my apartment and we started making noise. Best 6-week home invasion I’ve ever had.

Anth: Once G and I had a rough idea for the album and demos to send, we sent it off to Samy to listen to. Once Samy agreed to incorporate and perform the drums, we were 3. Then it was a matter of tracking down all those guests to fill out the rest of the band.

Samy: When we realized the scope of the project, we brought on other musicians to complete the album, including some world-class performers.  However, for the purpose of this album, the three of us made a conscious decision to remain as a trio – at least until the album was completed.

UMAE - Lost in the View

You have just launched your debut album. What do you have to say on the concept behind “Lost in the View”?

Anth: For me, it’s mainly about various aspects of the past and how it affects us, how we hold onto it, and how we move forward with or from it.

Guðjón: To me it’s more of a thematic album than a concept album, even though in my head I have fairly detailed stories for the characters. Overall that is left up to interpretation though.

How do you think the music interacts or reflects on the themes you’re touching on in this album?

Anth: I feel like, because the music existed before the lyrics for most of what was written, the lyrical themes are actually more of a reflection of the music. For me, that’s almost always the case. I’ll write a piece of music, and let the lyrics flow out of that. I hope that gives a bit of insight into that interaction.

What went into the writing process of “Lost in the View”?

Anth: with my parts, I generally hear what I want to write in my head, then I figure it out on guitar and/or chart it out in a midi program. So, that’s what I was doing mainly.

As far as writing together goes, I would have a part of a song, a full song, or a full structure of a song with just guitar written, or Guðjón would have something like that as well, and we just sort of fed off each other’s ideas, essentially doing rough demos of everything into Pro Tools.

Sometimes I’d have a part and G would have a part, we’d order them, then connect them by filling in the middle. We just did a whole lot of that sort of stuff.

Guðjón: The core writing was actually done pretty fast over Anth’s initial 6-week stay in Iceland. We developed the ideas and arrangements over the course of the following year, and you could even say up until the very final mixes. Since we were working cross-continents, correspondence with Samy and Anth was pretty much constant throughout the process.

The album features guest appearances from John Wesley, Conner Green, Adam Holzman and Eric Gillette, among many other musicians. What was it like working with them?

Anth: It was really cool. They are all really down-to-earth sort of people, and all very enthusiastic. Everyone involved in the album really just emanated musicianship and passion for such, and I feel that it really shows in their contributions to the album.

[embedded content]

What’s the idea behind the artwork?

Anth: When I was staying in Iceland for the first time, I was taken aback by all the scenery. Environment and atmosphere plays a big part in creativity for me. So, one morning, I sat at the dining room table at Guðjón’s’ family’s home and was looking out the window at this little mountain called Þorbjörn, and I decided to sketch it.

At some point, we were discussing album artwork, and my sketch came up. It seemed fitting to us. I like it because, to me, it represented letting go and moving forward from the past and just taking in something fresh and new. I know it will mean different things for different people, but that’s how it was for me.

Guðjón: It’s sort of the opposite for me. *laughs* I recently moved out of the country, away from that very mountain, to start something new. It ties into the concept in a nice way.

What advice might you have for other musicians, whether from a creative or business perspective?

Anth: Don’t wait for things to just happen. If you want your music to go anywhere at all, you have to start researching and learning everything you need to do, organize it into logical steps, then start executing it. You need to treat it like a full time job that you are not only not getting paid for, but actually investing time and money into. Lastly, you need to love it, otherwise you won’t be able to do all of the above for it.

Guðjón: Do it. Then do it some more.

Stay tuned with UMÆ on Facebook.

This news story was originally published here: http://www.prog-sphere.com/interviews/umae-interview/
UMÆ Release "Turn Back Time" Single, Feat. John Wesley (Porcupine Tree) and Conner Green (Haken)

Progressive rock trio UMÆ emerged in 2017, and in the early days of January 2019 the band digitally released their debut album ‘Lost in the View’, which sees the core trio comprised of Anthony Cliplef (guitar, vocals), Guðjón Sveinsson (vocals, guitar) and Samy-George Salib (drums) collaborating with number of musicians including John Wesley (Porcupine Tree), Conner Green (Haken), Adam Holzman (Steven Wilson), and Eric Gillette (Neal Morse Band).

The trio answered our questions about the album, inspiration, and more.

Hello! First of all, I’d like to thank you for taking the time to answer this interview. How are you?

Samy: Living the dream.

Anth: Great, thanks. Thank you for having us.

Guðjón: Good, good!

Where did you get your band’s name from?

Anth: The characters are Icelandic, but the name is gibberish. Guðjón and I settled on this gibberish, which is also an inside joke, because it sounded good to us. The cool thing about using a name with no meaning attaches to it is that our band gets to define it entirely by our music.

If you had to describe your band’s sound in short terms, how would you?

Anth: It’s all over the place, but collected, haha.

What are the bands that have inspired you most with regards to your own music?

Anth: For me, Dream Theater, Transatlantic, Yes, Genesis, Rush, King Crimson, Steven Wilson… basically just a whole lot of Prog.

Samy: I’m actually inspired by drummers that have the right balance of emotion and technique, including Steve Gadd,  Gavin Harrison, Todd Sucherman, Charlie Adams and Matt Garstka for example.  This has opened me up to a variety of genres, as they make the drums “sing” and are able to play to the song without “hijacking” it.

Guðjón: I remember sending Anth 4 albums initially when discussing influences for the project; “Act IV” by The Dear Hunter, “Plains of the Purple Buffalo” by shels*, “A Long Time Listening” by Agent Fresco, and “The Tief, the Tide, and the River’s End” by Caligula’s Horse. I’m pretty sure these influences seeped into it, as well as more artists in that vein.

What’s the story behind the formation of UMÆ?

Anth: I met my bandmates for the first time on stage, playing unrehearsed covers of Dream Theater and Steven Wilson songs, down in Florida.

When I got home to Canada, I felt inspired and wanted to do something with the musicians I had played with. So, I sent them some midi programmed demo song files I had made. It wasn’t long before Guðjón got back to me about collaborating on some music.

Guðjón: Before I knew, he was sitting in my apartment and we started making noise. Best 6-week home invasion I’ve ever had.

Anth: Once G and I had a rough idea for the album and demos to send, we sent it off to Samy to listen to. Once Samy agreed to incorporate and perform the drums, we were 3. Then it was a matter of tracking down all those guests to fill out the rest of the band.

Samy: When we realized the scope of the project, we brought on other musicians to complete the album, including some world-class performers.  However, for the purpose of this album, the three of us made a conscious decision to remain as a trio – at least until the album was completed.

UMAE - Lost in the View

You have just launched your debut album. What do you have to say on the concept behind “Lost in the View”?

Anth: For me, it’s mainly about various aspects of the past and how it affects us, how we hold onto it, and how we move forward with or from it.

Guðjón: To me it’s more of a thematic album than a concept album, even though in my head I have fairly detailed stories for the characters. Overall that is left up to interpretation though.

How do you think the music interacts or reflects on the themes you’re touching on in this album?

Anth: I feel like, because the music existed before the lyrics for most of what was written, the lyrical themes are actually more of a reflection of the music. For me, that’s almost always the case. I’ll write a piece of music, and let the lyrics flow out of that. I hope that gives a bit of insight into that interaction.

What went into the writing process of “Lost in the View”?

Anth: with my parts, I generally hear what I want to write in my head, then I figure it out on guitar and/or chart it out in a midi program. So, that’s what I was doing mainly.

As far as writing together goes, I would have a part of a song, a full song, or a full structure of a song with just guitar written, or Guðjón would have something like that as well, and we just sort of fed off each other’s ideas, essentially doing rough demos of everything into Pro Tools.

Sometimes I’d have a part and G would have a part, we’d order them, then connect them by filling in the middle. We just did a whole lot of that sort of stuff.

Guðjón: The core writing was actually done pretty fast over Anth’s initial 6-week stay in Iceland. We developed the ideas and arrangements over the course of the following year, and you could even say up until the very final mixes. Since we were working cross-continents, correspondence with Samy and Anth was pretty much constant throughout the process.

The album features guest appearances from John Wesley, Conner Green, Adam Holzman and Eric Gillette, among many other musicians. What was it like working with them?

Anth: It was really cool. They are all really down-to-earth sort of people, and all very enthusiastic. Everyone involved in the album really just emanated musicianship and passion for such, and I feel that it really shows in their contributions to the album.

[embedded content]

What’s the idea behind the artwork?

Anth: When I was staying in Iceland for the first time, I was taken aback by all the scenery. Environment and atmosphere plays a big part in creativity for me. So, one morning, I sat at the dining room table at Guðjón’s’ family’s home and was looking out the window at this little mountain called Þorbjörn, and I decided to sketch it.

At some point, we were discussing album artwork, and my sketch came up. It seemed fitting to us. I like it because, to me, it represented letting go and moving forward from the past and just taking in something fresh and new. I know it will mean different things for different people, but that’s how it was for me.

Guðjón: It’s sort of the opposite for me. *laughs* I recently moved out of the country, away from that very mountain, to start something new. It ties into the concept in a nice way.

What advice might you have for other musicians, whether from a creative or business perspective?

Anth: Don’t wait for things to just happen. If you want your music to go anywhere at all, you have to start researching and learning everything you need to do, organize it into logical steps, then start executing it. You need to treat it like a full time job that you are not only not getting paid for, but actually investing time and money into. Lastly, you need to love it, otherwise you won’t be able to do all of the above for it.

Guðjón: Do it. Then do it some more.

Stay tuned with UMÆ on Facebook.

This news story was originally published here: http://www.prog-sphere.com/specials/king-crimson-2019-tour-dates/
KING CRIMSON Announces 2019 Tour Dates In Celebration of 50 Years

In celebration of 50 years, King Crimson announces 50 Concerts for 2019. The current eight musician line-up will perform 50 concerts across three continents as part of their 2019 Celebration tour.

Dates confirmed so far, are as follows:

King Crimson 2019 Tour Dates:
JUN 10, 2019 – HAUS AUENSEE, Leipzig
JUN 12, 2019 – JAHRHUNDERTHALLE, Frankfurt
JUN 13, 2019 – JAHRHUNDERTHALLE, Frankfurt
JUN 15, 2019 – LIEDERHALLE, Stuttgart
JUN 16, 2019 – LIEDERHALLE, Stuttgart
JUN 18, 2019 – ROYAL ALBERT HALL, London
JUN 19, 2019 – ROYAL ALBERT HALL, London
JUN 20, 2019 – ROYAL ALBERT HALL, London
JUN 22, 2019 – DE VEREENIGING, Nijmegen
JUN 23, 2019 – DE VEREENIGING, Nijmegen
JUN 26, 2019 – TEATR ROMA, Warsaw
JUN 27, 2019 – TEATR ROMA, Warsaw
JUN 29, 2019 – ZITADELLE, Berlin
JUL 04, 2019 – ROMISCHES THEATER AUGUSTA RAURICA, Basel
JUL 08, 2019 – ARENA DI VERONA, Verona
JUL 10, 2019 – STUPINIGI SONIC PARK, Torino
JUL 12, 2019 – DOCTOR MUSIC FESTIVAL, Escalarre
JUL 13, 2019 – DOCTOR MUSIC FESTIVAL, Escalarre
JUL 14, 2019 – DOCTOR MUSIC FESTIVAL, Escalarre
JUL 18, 2019 – ARENA SANTA GIULIANA, Perugia
AUG 23, 2019 – TEATRO METROPOLITAN, Mexico City
AUG 24, 2019 – TEATRO METROPOLITAN, Mexico City
AUG 27, 2019 – TEATRO DIANA, Guadalajara
AUG 29, 2019 – TEATRO METROPOLITAN, Mexico City
SEP 03, 2019 – GREEK THEATRE, Los Angeles
SEP 05, 2019 – FOX THEATER, Oakland
SEP 06, 2019 – FOX THEATER, Oakland
SEP 08, 2019 – PARAMOUNT THEATER, Denver
SEP 10, 2019 – AUDITORIUM THEATRE OF ROOSEVELT UNIVERSITY, Chicago
SEP 12, 2019 – WARNER THEATRE, Washington D.C.
SEP 14, 2019 – BUDWEISER STAGE, Toronto
SEP 17, 2019 – ST DENIS THEATRE, Montreal
SEP 19, 2019 – BOCH CENTER WANG THEATER, Boston
SEP 21, 2019 – RADIO CITY MUSIC HALL, New York City
SEP 23, 2019 – THE MET, Philidelphia
SEP 25, 2019 – HARD ROCK ROCKSINO, Cleveland
SEP 27, 2019 – THE RYMAN AUDITORIUM, Nashville
SEP 29, 2019 – THE COBB CENTER, Atlanta
OCT 06, 2019 – SUNSET STAGE ROCK IN RIO – Rio de Janeiro

KC2019

Since the band’s return to live performance in 2014, with critically acclaimed sell-out shows all over the world including two defining shows at the Roman amphitheatre in Pompeii, the audience has been reinvented, as much as the band itself:

“In Pompeii, a large percentage of the audience was young couples; KC moved into the mainstream in Italy. I walked onstage knowing that this band’s position in the world has changed level.” Robert Fripp

The band’s packed three-hour shows regularly include material from twelve of their thirteen studio albums, including many of the songs from their seminal 1969 album In The Court of the Crimson King, described by Pete Townshend, as an “uncanny masterpiece”. The new 8-piece line-up plays many historic pieces which Crimson have never played live, as well as new arrangements of Crimson classics – “the music is new whenever it was written”. There are also new instrumentals and songs, as well as the compositions by the three drummers, Pat Mastelotto, Gavin Harrison and Jeremy Stacey, which are a regular highlight. A unique show, where eight of the best musicians in the world play music without distraction or adornment.

King Crimson

This news story was originally published here: https://www.prog-sphere.com/specials/king-crimson-2019-tour-dates/
KING CRIMSON Announces 2019 Tour Dates In Celebration of 50 Years

In celebration of 50 years, King Crimson announces 50 Concerts for 2019. The current eight musician line-up will perform 50 concerts across three continents as part of their 2019 Celebration tour.

Dates confirmed so far, are as follows:

King Crimson 2019 Tour Dates:
JUN 10, 2019 – HAUS AUENSEE, Leipzig
JUN 12, 2019 – JAHRHUNDERTHALLE, Frankfurt
JUN 13, 2019 – JAHRHUNDERTHALLE, Frankfurt
JUN 15, 2019 – LIEDERHALLE, Stuttgart
JUN 16, 2019 – LIEDERHALLE, Stuttgart
JUN 18, 2019 – ROYAL ALBERT HALL, London
JUN 19, 2019 – ROYAL ALBERT HALL, London
JUN 20, 2019 – ROYAL ALBERT HALL, London
JUN 22, 2019 – DE VEREENIGING, Nijmegen
JUN 23, 2019 – DE VEREENIGING, Nijmegen
JUN 26, 2019 – TEATR ROMA, Warsaw
JUN 27, 2019 – TEATR ROMA, Warsaw
JUN 29, 2019 – ZITADELLE, Berlin
JUL 04, 2019 – ROMISCHES THEATER AUGUSTA RAURICA, Basel
JUL 08, 2019 – ARENA DI VERONA, Verona
JUL 10, 2019 – STUPINIGI SONIC PARK, Torino
JUL 12, 2019 – DOCTOR MUSIC FESTIVAL, Escalarre
JUL 13, 2019 – DOCTOR MUSIC FESTIVAL, Escalarre
JUL 14, 2019 – DOCTOR MUSIC FESTIVAL, Escalarre
JUL 18, 2019 – ARENA SANTA GIULIANA, Perugia
AUG 23, 2019 – TEATRO METROPOLITAN, Mexico City
AUG 24, 2019 – TEATRO METROPOLITAN, Mexico City
AUG 27, 2019 – TEATRO DIANA, Guadalajara
AUG 29, 2019 – TEATRO METROPOLITAN, Mexico City
SEP 03, 2019 – GREEK THEATRE, Los Angeles
SEP 05, 2019 – FOX THEATER, Oakland
SEP 06, 2019 – FOX THEATER, Oakland
SEP 08, 2019 – PARAMOUNT THEATER, Denver
SEP 10, 2019 – AUDITORIUM THEATRE OF ROOSEVELT UNIVERSITY, Chicago
SEP 12, 2019 – WARNER THEATRE, Washington D.C.
SEP 14, 2019 – BUDWEISER STAGE, Toronto
SEP 17, 2019 – ST DENIS THEATRE, Montreal
SEP 19, 2019 – BOCH CENTER WANG THEATER, Boston
SEP 21, 2019 – RADIO CITY MUSIC HALL, New York City
SEP 23, 2019 – THE MET, Philidelphia
SEP 25, 2019 – HARD ROCK ROCKSINO, Cleveland
SEP 27, 2019 – THE RYMAN AUDITORIUM, Nashville
SEP 29, 2019 – THE COBB CENTER, Atlanta
OCT 06, 2019 – SUNSET STAGE ROCK IN RIO – Rio de Janeiro

KC2019

Since the band’s return to live performance in 2014, with critically acclaimed sell-out shows all over the world including two defining shows at the Roman amphitheatre in Pompeii, the audience has been reinvented, as much as the band itself:

“In Pompeii, a large percentage of the audience was young couples; KC moved into the mainstream in Italy. I walked onstage knowing that this band’s position in the world has changed level.” Robert Fripp

The band’s packed three-hour shows regularly include material from twelve of their thirteen studio albums, including many of the songs from their seminal 1969 album In The Court of the Crimson King, described by Pete Townshend, as an “uncanny masterpiece”. The new 8-piece line-up plays many historic pieces which Crimson have never played live, as well as new arrangements of Crimson classics – “the music is new whenever it was written”. There are also new instrumentals and songs, as well as the compositions by the three drummers, Pat Mastelotto, Gavin Harrison and Jeremy Stacey, which are a regular highlight. A unique show, where eight of the best musicians in the world play music without distraction or adornment.

King Crimson

This news story was originally published here: http://www.prog-sphere.com/interviews/chine-interview/
CHINE

Self-proclaimed Dystopian Death Metal metallers from Sweden, CHINE are on the verge of launching their new EP release. Titled “Like Vultures,” it is scheduled for the March 2nd, 2019 release, and it brings four new tracks of uncompromising death metal sound intercepted with technical excursions. In an interview for Prog Sphere, Swedes talk about the upcoming release and more.

Define the mission of CHINE.

We’re striving towards delivering brutal music with substans and a character of it’s own, and with our own liking in mind before anyone else’s.

This is the goal, getting there is of course something else.

Tell me about the creative process that informed your upcoming EP “Like Vultures” and the themes it captures.

You know, you gather a lot of stuff from your everyday life not necessarily involving you directly, but still. You end up giving a lot of thought to subjects that you’re being exposed to, and there’s a lot of awful stuff constantly happening around us. It’s a smorgasbord, just take a pick or several.

What is the message you are trying to give with “Like Vultures”?

Each song has it’s own meaning, even though it started out as a concept album. It ended up being four different tracks handling subjects as being pushed beyond your boundaries leading you towards your end, being proud of who you are even if the world is against your ways, but also questioning if you really like yourself and the person you have become. A lot of people can probably relate to these things, so the message I guess is that there are more people like you out there, no matter who you are. This can be interpreted as either a good or a bad thing.

How did you document the music while it was being formulated?

We put a lot of work into our pre productions, which we still ended up changing quite a bit in comparison to the final product this time. I usually come up with an idea and the backbone of riffs and arrangement, then we usually try it out in the rehearsal room and swop the parts to where it feels “locked into place” when you actually play it with some volume, and the energy of syncing together with other people. Nowadays it all ends up in Pro Tools quite early in the process, but it starts with little bits and pieces from the iPhone, humming and hammering on stuff in random places where something might have popped up in your head.

Is the dynamic flow of the pieces carefully architected?

I would say that it actually is. I mean even if it doesn’t always sound that way, we try a lot of combinations to make the different parts fit. Using dynamics is a great way of keeping the song interesting for the listener.

Describe the approach to recording the album.

As with every new album you feel that “this is the one, these are the best songs we’ve ever written and we now have better circumstances than ever compared to previous album recordings”, and this might later show itself to be true or not, but when you stop getting this feeling with your new stuff its probably time to question if you should keep on doing it. For us that point hasn’t come yet, despite that we have played together as Chine since 2005.

CHINE - Like Vultures

How long “Like Vultures” was in the making?

If you count the actual recording I would say a few months. Unfortunately It’s not a very glamorous thing to record an album for us, and the band members are never in the studio at the same time, more like two at a time; the one that is pressing the rec button and the other one thats being taped. We live in cities quite far apart from each other so it’s sort of a long distance relationship.

Where does “Like Vultures” stand in comparison with previous releases “Immanent” (2015), “Betray Your Own Kind” (2012), and your debut “Repulsive Sonatas”?

Since our albums has been released with some time in between they differ a lot from each other. With ‘Immanent’ I think our song writing improved, and if you look at ‘Like Vultures’ we have been writing together more than ever before which has been very developing. Sure it’s a matter of compromise at times, but it feels quite good to let someone else decide which way to go, and to just trust that person instead of having to be a part of every single detail and “winning” the creative arguments.

Which bands or artists influenced your work on the new EP?

Sometimes I think that would be for the impartial listener to decide. We like bands like Gojira, The Haunted, Soilwork from our home town Helsingborg, but I doubt that we sound that much like them. Parts here and there perhaps. You can always count on someone outside the band to have references to other bands, a lot of times that you’ve never heard of. I often try to just place my fingers randomly on the fretboard and see if any interesting and eerie harmonies comes up, after that you can start building tempo, groove and foundation of rhythms. Of course a lot of stuff is common riffing, which can be found in a million other metal bands. A vision is, as I said earlier, to make truly original stuff, but we are not there yet and maybe never will be. The easiest way to be original nowadays is to go back in time to the 70′s or 80′s and play on peoples nostalgia.

What is your view on technology in music?

Well, feel free to use it as much as you like if you find it to be enhancing. I know that we have tried to walk a more old school way before, but you can’t deny the awesome features that technology brings, and it keeps on improving at an escalating pace. I know that we will look into it a lot more than before on upcoming productions.

Do you see your music as serving a purpose beyond music?

It’s hard to defend a purpose beyond music for other people than ourselves, considering the amount of all the similar music that is being released every day. For me and hopefully the rest of the guys in the band it provides the greatest feeling available in life, creating and performing music that you’ve put together. I get extremely happy and grateful when showed appreciation from someone that has heard Chine and liked it. One positive comment and I feel good for days, but one mustn’t forget that negative response also serve a purpose and indicates that someone actually bothered to express something, even if it is bad.

What are your plans for the future?

We do this pretty much in the present, but among upcoming things in a near future are a couple of videos, release party with hopefully the opportunity to sell a bunch of our newly pressed 10″ vinyls, very nice product to have in stock as a band. We are going to focus a lot on ‘Like Vultures’ and promoting each of the tracks separately giving it the attention it deserves considering the energy, time and money we spent on writing and recording it. You wouldn’t want to make the mistake of releasing it all at once and letting it become a thing of the past in just a couple of days.

Follow CHINE on Facebook for future updates.

This news story was originally published here: https://www.prog-sphere.com/interviews/chine-interview/
CHINE

Self-proclaimed Dystopian Death Metal metallers from Sweden, CHINE are on the verge of launching their new EP release. Titled “Like Vultures,” it is scheduled for the March 2nd, 2019 release, and it brings four new tracks of uncompromising death metal sound intercepted with technical excursions. In an interview for Prog Sphere, Swedes talk about the upcoming release and more.

Define the mission of CHINE.

We’re striving towards delivering brutal music with substans and a character of it’s own, and with our own liking in mind before anyone else’s.

This is the goal, getting there is of course something else.

Tell me about the creative process that informed your upcoming EP “Like Vultures” and the themes it captures.

You know, you gather a lot of stuff from your everyday life not necessarily involving you directly, but still. You end up giving a lot of thought to subjects that you’re being exposed to, and there’s a lot of awful stuff constantly happening around us. It’s a smorgasbord, just take a pick or several.

What is the message you are trying to give with “Like Vultures”?

Each song has it’s own meaning, even though it started out as a concept album. It ended up being four different tracks handling subjects as being pushed beyond your boundaries leading you towards your end, being proud of who you are even if the world is against your ways, but also questioning if you really like yourself and the person you have become. A lot of people can probably relate to these things, so the message I guess is that there are more people like you out there, no matter who you are. This can be interpreted as either a good or a bad thing.

How did you document the music while it was being formulated?

We put a lot of work into our pre productions, which we still ended up changing quite a bit in comparison to the final product this time. I usually come up with an idea and the backbone of riffs and arrangement, then we usually try it out in the rehearsal room and swop the parts to where it feels “locked into place” when you actually play it with some volume, and the energy of syncing together with other people. Nowadays it all ends up in Pro Tools quite early in the process, but it starts with little bits and pieces from the iPhone, humming and hammering on stuff in random places where something might have popped up in your head.

Is the dynamic flow of the pieces carefully architected?

I would say that it actually is. I mean even if it doesn’t always sound that way, we try a lot of combinations to make the different parts fit. Using dynamics is a great way of keeping the song interesting for the listener.

Describe the approach to recording the album.

As with every new album you feel that “this is the one, these are the best songs we’ve ever written and we now have better circumstances than ever compared to previous album recordings”, and this might later show itself to be true or not, but when you stop getting this feeling with your new stuff its probably time to question if you should keep on doing it. For us that point hasn’t come yet, despite that we have played together as Chine since 2005.

CHINE - Like Vultures

How long “Like Vultures” was in the making?

If you count the actual recording I would say a few months. Unfortunately It’s not a very glamorous thing to record an album for us, and the band members are never in the studio at the same time, more like two at a time; the one that is pressing the rec button and the other one thats being taped. We live in cities quite far apart from each other so it’s sort of a long distance relationship.

Where does “Like Vultures” stand in comparison with previous releases “Immanent” (2015), “Betray Your Own Kind” (2012), and your debut “Repulsive Sonatas”?

Since our albums has been released with some time in between they differ a lot from each other. With ‘Immanent’ I think our song writing improved, and if you look at ‘Like Vultures’ we have been writing together more than ever before which has been very developing. Sure it’s a matter of compromise at times, but it feels quite good to let someone else decide which way to go, and to just trust that person instead of having to be a part of every single detail and “winning” the creative arguments.

Which bands or artists influenced your work on the new EP?

Sometimes I think that would be for the impartial listener to decide. We like bands like Gojira, The Haunted, Soilwork from our home town Helsingborg, but I doubt that we sound that much like them. Parts here and there perhaps. You can always count on someone outside the band to have references to other bands, a lot of times that you’ve never heard of. I often try to just place my fingers randomly on the fretboard and see if any interesting and eerie harmonies comes up, after that you can start building tempo, groove and foundation of rhythms. Of course a lot of stuff is common riffing, which can be found in a million other metal bands. A vision is, as I said earlier, to make truly original stuff, but we are not there yet and maybe never will be. The easiest way to be original nowadays is to go back in time to the 70′s or 80′s and play on peoples nostalgia.

What is your view on technology in music?

Well, feel free to use it as much as you like if you find it to be enhancing. I know that we have tried to walk a more old school way before, but you can’t deny the awesome features that technology brings, and it keeps on improving at an escalating pace. I know that we will look into it a lot more than before on upcoming productions.

Do you see your music as serving a purpose beyond music?

It’s hard to defend a purpose beyond music for other people than ourselves, considering the amount of all the similar music that is being released every day. For me and hopefully the rest of the guys in the band it provides the greatest feeling available in life, creating and performing music that you’ve put together. I get extremely happy and grateful when showed appreciation from someone that has heard Chine and liked it. One positive comment and I feel good for days, but one mustn’t forget that negative response also serve a purpose and indicates that someone actually bothered to express something, even if it is bad.

What are your plans for the future?

We do this pretty much in the present, but among upcoming things in a near future are a couple of videos, release party with hopefully the opportunity to sell a bunch of our newly pressed 10″ vinyls, very nice product to have in stock as a band. We are going to focus a lot on ‘Like Vultures’ and promoting each of the tracks separately giving it the attention it deserves considering the energy, time and money we spent on writing and recording it. You wouldn’t want to make the mistake of releasing it all at once and letting it become a thing of the past in just a couple of days.

Follow CHINE on Facebook for future updates.

This news story was originally published here: http://www.prog-sphere.com/specials/acidiun-insight-video-premiere/
Exclusive: ACIDIUN Launch Music Video for Riff-Laden "Insight"

Uppsala, Sweden’s metalcore five-piece ACIDIUN released their full-length debut album The Coalescence in September last year. Teaming up with Prog Sphere, the band is launching a music video for the song “Insight” taken from the mentioned release. Watch it below.

Commented the band: “The lyrics of ‘Insight’ represent the aftermath of one’s decision when you realize what you’ve done and you’re left with the consequences. In the album’s storyline the protagonist is dealing with his thoughts after committing to a murder. Shooting this video was so much fun since we just did what we normally do when we hit the stage… We go out with full energy and have the best of times. This video truly captures Acidiun and our will to just headbang and give it our all.

The Coalescence is a concept album about a fictive character with a deranged mind, coping with the opposing forces in his head. Two singles — “Urges” and “Burn Bright” — were launched prior the release.

With a blend of hardcore, thrash and death metal Acidiun write songs that are driven by ferocious riffs and everchanging transitions with an organic flow. The music and songs are diverse and Acidiun keeps the brutality in the music along with grooves, blastbeats and breakdowns.

The Coalescence is available from Spotify, iTunes, Google Play and Deezer. For more from ACIDIUN follow the band on Facebook and Instagram.

[embedded content]

Acidiun - The Coalescence

This news story was originally published here: https://www.prog-sphere.com/specials/acidiun-insight-video-premiere/
Exclusive: ACIDIUN Launch Music Video for Riff-Laden "Insight"

Uppsala, Sweden’s metalcore five-piece ACIDIUN released their full-length debut album The Coalescence in September last year. Teaming up with Prog Sphere, the band is launching a music video for the song “Insight” taken from the mentioned release. Watch it below.

Commented the band: “The lyrics of ‘Insight’ represent the aftermath of one’s decision when you realize what you’ve done and you’re left with the consequences. In the album’s storyline the protagonist is dealing with his thoughts after committing to a murder. Shooting this video was so much fun since we just did what we normally do when we hit the stage… We go out with full energy and have the best of times. This video truly captures Acidiun and our will to just headbang and give it our all.

The Coalescence is a concept album about a fictive character with a deranged mind, coping with the opposing forces in his head. Two singles — “Urges” and “Burn Bright” — were launched prior the release.

With a blend of hardcore, thrash and death metal Acidiun write songs that are driven by ferocious riffs and everchanging transitions with an organic flow. The music and songs are diverse and Acidiun keeps the brutality in the music along with grooves, blastbeats and breakdowns.

The Coalescence is available from Spotify, iTunes, Google Play and Deezer. For more from ACIDIUN follow the band on Facebook and Instagram.

[embedded content]

Acidiun - The Coalescence