ProgSphere

This news story was originally published here: http://www.prog-sphere.com/interviews/ring-of-gyges-interview/
Ring of Gyges

Iceland has been on a Prog map in the recent years, giving birth to some great bands (check our Scene Report on Iceland here). Ring of Gyges is a newcomer, who back in November 2017 launched their full-length debut album ‘Beyond the Night Sky,’ and according to what they showcase on it, it is certainly a band to look for in the coming years. Singer and guitatrist Helgi Jónsson spoke for Prog Sphere.

Define the mission of Ring of Gyges.

We strive to mix influences and create a unique mix of old prog and new. What motivates us to write music is simply our passion for music in general, and the prospect of one day making it a full-time job for all of us. Great music affects you in ways that nothing else truly can, and if we can affect anyone in the same way that music has affected us, it will all be worth it.

Tell me about the creative process that informed your debut album Beyond the Night Sky and the themes it captures.

The album was a long time in the making and lots of those songs had already existed for years before we ever entered the studio. Most of the songs were created in our own respective homes, where one of us made a demo and we checked them out at home and then met up at rehearsal to work on them together. However, each song is different and requires a different approach to the next one. Sometimes a song is completely written before the rest of the band is introduced to it, sometimes it requires a bit of group effort to decide how to proceed with it. Most of the songs were written by me and Guðjón [Sveinsson, guitars & vocals], but there’s also a song by Gísli [Þór Ingólfsson, keyboards & piano] on there and everyone brought something to the table. The album deals with themes such as escapism, addiction, and death. It was originally intended as a concept album with a storyline but eventually we scrapped that idea and decided to make a more thematic album instead, with various short stories that all relate to an overarching theme.

Beyond the Night Sky

What is the message you are trying to give with Beyond the Night Sky

That’s something we didn’t really discuss between us, but I guess what we’re trying to say is that no matter how bleak a situation is, there’s always someone willing to stand by your side. Escaping your problems is ultimately a temporary solution, and though it may be hard, it’s better to face them instead.

How did you document the music while it was being formulated?

Like I mentioned before, every song requires a slightly different process. Most of the time we had demos at home, but I guess we mostly just documented the songs by learning them and rehearsing them collectively, adding onto them as we went along during rehearsals. We’d already played a lot of them live by the point we entered the studio, so obviously we knew them fairly well at that point. Other songs we weren’t so familiar with, so in those cases we usually had demos to work with.

Is the dynamic flow of the pieces carefully architected?

We really tried to make the album flow as well as we could, so it would feel as a whole experience and not merely a collection of songs. Some songs were written to flow well together, like the first two tracks and the last two. In other parts of the album it was a bit more of a puzzle, but I think in the end we settled on a structure that we all liked. If we did our job well, the album is best enjoyed when listened to in its entirety, just like all our favorite albums.

Describe the approach to recording the album.

Our guitarist Guðjón had enrolled in a music production course at Stúdíó Sýrland in Reykjavík where one of the assignments was to record a full album with a band, so of course we jumped on that wagon. We had some restrictions to deal with though, we had to record during hours when the studio was available so we had to record in a series of sessions of varying length. Some bands can just book a studio for a few weeks and dedicate that time to recording, we weren’t so lucky. Like when we recorded the drums we couldn’t leave the drum kit in the same place for more than one evening because a different recording session was scheduled the following day. We knew that if we had to reassemble the drum kit and the microphone setup sometime later, we couldn’t possibly make the drums sound  the same between sessions. So instead we decided to record through the night in a single monster 17-hour session, poor Einar got so tired I think he still might be recovering! We didn’t get around to completely record the album before Guðjón‘s assignment was due, so luckily we had access to a smaller studio in Grindavík where we could put down the final touches. We also booked a session at the legendary Sundlaugin Studios, where we recorded a real Hammond organ and Mellotron.

How long Beyond the Night Sky was in the making?

The recording process was over in a matter of months, maybe two or three total. However, the processes before and after took much longer. Some of the songs were written up to two years before we ever started recording. The post-production was also a bit of a mess, we’re an unsigned independent band so we had to do a lot of the labour ourselves, Guðjón had to mix during his free time when he wasn’t working. We had a crowdfunding campaign to fund the mastering and release of the album and we reached our goal in the end. So I guess, depending on your definition, the total process must’ve been around three years. Releasing the album was a huge relief and the end of an era in our band’s history, while also being the start of another one.

Which bands or artists influenced your work on the release?

It’s hard to see where all of your influences come from, but here are some names: Opeth, Haken, Dream Theater, Porcupine Tree, Steven Wilson, Genesis, Yes, King Crimson, Mastodon, Caligula’s Horse, Leprous, Agent Fresco.

What is your view on technology in music?

We owe a lot of our success to technical advances in music production, and without it this album possibly wouldn’t have ever been made. Nowadays everyone has the capability to make demos in their bedroom, you can move ProTools sessions between studios and so on. However there’s a limit to how much some bands decide to over-produce their music, some even go as far as quantizing the guitars, auto-tuning vocals and using drum samples instead of actually having to learn your parts and play them properly. I believe no technology is inherently bad, what makes the difference is how you use it. Don’t alter the recordings beyond recognition in the studio and get confused when people boo at you onstage because you can’t play it properly. Keep it real.

Do you see your music as serving a purpose beyond music?

I don’t think so. Maybe it will help people deal with some stuff in their lives, but if it does it’s a fortunate side-effect rather than an inherent purpose. I believe music is the purest art form, it transcends language, culture, nationality and race and can be understood by anyone simply for what it is. Lyrics belong to the realm of poetry, but music itself is a universal language of its own.

What are your plans for the future?

Our plans are to tour, get management and try our very hardest to do music for a living. Right now it’s pretty undetermined what will happen. We’ll have to wait and see.

Follow Ring of Gyges on Facebook.

This news story was originally published here: http://www.prog-sphere.com/specials/john-petrucci-on-next-dream-theater-album/
JOHN PETRUCCI Started Playing Guitar Because He Wanted to "Stay Up Late"

John Petrucci discussed mixed fan reactions to latest Dream Theater album The Astonishing, telling Music Radar when asked if he’d now “do anything differently“:

I couldn’t be more proud of the work that Jordan [Rudess] and I did as far as the writing, and that the band did in every aspect of the recording, and the enormity of the project, and the job that Richard Chycki did in engineering this insane amount of music – all these orchestral and choir elements – and then the crazy tour that we did with a production that took a year to build.

If I had the chance to do it over, I would do it differently, though.

We have the novel coming out now – in a perfect world, I think I would have had the novel done [first]; release the novel so people could read the story; and then do the tour and have the album available at the show when you leave. I think that would have given the whole experience a lot more meaning to fans.

I understand that stylistically, it might not be every Dream Theater fan’s cup of tea.

Some people think it’s one of our greatest works, and some people, it’s not something that they’re into. As a standalone album, it’s a soundtrack to a larger piece – to a live show, a novel, a movie, whatever – and sometimes, that’s hard to absorb in that big of a chunk, given there’s over two hours of music.

But the consistency as far as reaction has always been to the show. When we did that live show and people walked away and really saw what it was about as far as the story and the presentation, there was a common response that this was something really special.

John also discussed the direction of the next DT record, saying:

“After ‘The Astonishing‘ – which was such an experimental piece of work, and something that had such a broad scope – we definitely want to return to doing something that’s more definitive and classic, but hopefully also staying current and using the things that we’ve learned as writers and as a producer to take it to the next level so we’re not ever repeating ourselves.

“It’s like staying rooted and grounded in the initial sound of the band and moving forward as far as trying to create something that’s new and interesting and exciting. I can’t wait.”

Also, Petrucci confirmed that his relationship with Mike Portnoy is indeed good, saying about that photo:

Mike and I have maintained a relationship and have been friends all these years. Our families are all good friends, and we’ve gotten together several times.

“That just was the first time we took a photo and posted a photo. [There’s] nothing to read into, other than it’s good to maintain good relationships. That’s really all it is.”

Asked if he got to hear the Sons of Apollo record, John replied:

Mike gave me the record. I haven’t listened to it yet. I heard the first song that came out. It sounds great. Those guys are all amazing, and Ron [Bumblefoot] is an incredible guitar player.

Mike‘s funny. He handed me a whole bunch of stuff that he had done – Flying Colors, Sons of Apollo, the Neal Morse record which I hadn’t had a chance to listen to – so I have a lot of listening ahead of me.”

This news story was originally published here: https://www.prog-sphere.com/specials/john-petrucci-on-next-dream-theater-album/
JOHN PETRUCCI Started Playing Guitar Because He Wanted to "Stay Up Late"

John Petrucci discussed mixed fan reactions to latest Dream Theater album The Astonishing, telling Music Radar when asked if he’d now “do anything differently“:

I couldn’t be more proud of the work that Jordan [Rudess] and I did as far as the writing, and that the band did in every aspect of the recording, and the enormity of the project, and the job that Richard Chycki did in engineering this insane amount of music – all these orchestral and choir elements – and then the crazy tour that we did with a production that took a year to build.

If I had the chance to do it over, I would do it differently, though.

We have the novel coming out now – in a perfect world, I think I would have had the novel done [first]; release the novel so people could read the story; and then do the tour and have the album available at the show when you leave. I think that would have given the whole experience a lot more meaning to fans.

I understand that stylistically, it might not be every Dream Theater fan’s cup of tea.

Some people think it’s one of our greatest works, and some people, it’s not something that they’re into. As a standalone album, it’s a soundtrack to a larger piece – to a live show, a novel, a movie, whatever – and sometimes, that’s hard to absorb in that big of a chunk, given there’s over two hours of music.

But the consistency as far as reaction has always been to the show. When we did that live show and people walked away and really saw what it was about as far as the story and the presentation, there was a common response that this was something really special.

John also discussed the direction of the next DT record, saying:

“After ‘The Astonishing‘ – which was such an experimental piece of work, and something that had such a broad scope – we definitely want to return to doing something that’s more definitive and classic, but hopefully also staying current and using the things that we’ve learned as writers and as a producer to take it to the next level so we’re not ever repeating ourselves.

“It’s like staying rooted and grounded in the initial sound of the band and moving forward as far as trying to create something that’s new and interesting and exciting. I can’t wait.”

Also, Petrucci confirmed that his relationship with Mike Portnoy is indeed good, saying about that photo:

Mike and I have maintained a relationship and have been friends all these years. Our families are all good friends, and we’ve gotten together several times.

“That just was the first time we took a photo and posted a photo. [There’s] nothing to read into, other than it’s good to maintain good relationships. That’s really all it is.”

Asked if he got to hear the Sons of Apollo record, John replied:

Mike gave me the record. I haven’t listened to it yet. I heard the first song that came out. It sounds great. Those guys are all amazing, and Ron [Bumblefoot] is an incredible guitar player.

Mike‘s funny. He handed me a whole bunch of stuff that he had done – Flying Colors, Sons of Apollo, the Neal Morse record which I hadn’t had a chance to listen to – so I have a lot of listening ahead of me.”

This news story was originally published here: http://www.prog-sphere.com/interviews/barry-weinberg-interview/
South Florida Prog Rock Songwriter BARRY WEINBERG Launches “Beyond the Astral Sky” Single

Barry Weinberg, a progressive rock songwriter from South Florida, recently launched his new album entitled ‘Samsarana,’ an effort that sees the artist exploring different soundscapes evolving around the personal experiences. In a new interview for Prog Sphere, Winberg talks about his vision with the album, the creative process behind it, and more.

Describe the musical vision propelling your new album Samsarana.

Like it says on the cover, my vision for Samsarana was a “Cinematic Rock Experience,” a movie for the ears, a musical novel with each song a chapter in an epic story of enlightenment and the breaking free of Samsarana – the endless cycle of birth, life and death – “This Vicious Circle.”

The album begins unconventionally with static – representing the chaos before creation. It is followed by a Big Bang and the orchestral music of “Conception” expresses the Universe coming into being. Consciousness emerges in “Creation” and so the story begins.

The working title of the album was “A God’s Tale” and I wanted to tell the story of a Universal Being creating the universe in order to experience itself, getting caught in the cycles of Karma and then breaking free.

What made it the right time to pursue that vision?

I started playing music when I was 12 and have always expressed myself best through songwriting. Many of the songs on the album I wrote at different times in my life. The earliest being “Beyond the Astral Sky” which I wrote when I was 18. (I’m soon to be 50!)

In 2006, I had the opportunity to write the soundtrack for a documentary film called “Florida Crackers: The Cowboys and Cattleman of Florida.” I heard about the project and submitted a song to the producer, he loved it and hired me. I wrote 18 songs for the film and for the first time had the experience of working in a professional music studio. I LOVED IT! It was at that time that the seed of Samsarana was planted. I thought to myself, “If I could do this for someone else, why not finally record MY music that I’ve worked on my whole life and share it with the WORLD!

Knowing how my creative process works, I felt that recording it at home would be much more effective for me than to go into a studio, so I started doing research and I put together a home studio over the course of the next year. Once everything was in place, I started laying down the tracks. As each song was recorded, I saw a story unfolding. I worked on it diligently for almost 10 years and in 2017 it was completed!

Barry Weinberg - Samsarana

Barry Weinberg – Samsarana

Tell me about what you’re communicating with the album cover.

In designing the artwork, I wanted to convey the idea of Creation, both musically and universally. Originally, I created a graphic of an eye floating out in space with a child reaching up to it. I sent it to my brother-in-law in Germany who is a graphic designer and the next day, he sent me back the image that is now on the cover. I loved it and we used it.

The album has a companion 13-page art and lyric booklet that is available for download when a person signs up for our fanclub on our website. In this booklet, each song has its own image in a similar style to the album cover.

What was the creative process for Samsarana like?

It was like simultaneously writing a novel, composing and arranging a film score and painting a picture. When starting this project, much of the music and lyrics were already written, but as I started recording, the music evolved beyond what I originally intended and new songs emerged to fill the gaps in the overall story of Samsarana.

The first thing people wonder when they hear about the album is “what kind of music is it?” Is it rock? Is it metal? Is it folk? The answer is yes. Besides the actual music and lyrics, I put a lot of attention on which style would best convey the message and mood of that song or “Chapter.” In fact, in some songs I combine genres and even transition from one to another. For example, “Endless Sea” starts off as a Bob Dylan-esque folk song evolves into more of a Bob Seger-y rock song and in the middle becomes an all out Grunge Metal breakout. It was a lot of fun to not be attached to any one genre and just express what needed to be expressed in the way it needed to be expressed.

Recording each song was like painting a picture. I’d first lay down the foundation with the basic tracks of percussion, bass, rhythm guitar and keyboards, if there were any. Then I’d add the lead guitars and vocals. I’d then listen to the song and in the context of the overall story, I’d add textures and effects to enhance the mood of the “scene.”

Is the dynamic flow of the pieces carefully architected?

Absolutely. Each song carries the story forward and between each song are sound recordings that bridge one song to the next. Another dynamic of the overall story is the influence of polarity in our lives. Love and Hate. Life and Death. Good and Evil. Therefore, I wanted to express this polarity using counterpoint between tones and genres between songs and sometimes within a song. For example, “Come Out and Play” is a fun, hard rock song about teenage crushes and the confusion we have as kids about what love is. This is followed by “A Passage of Time” which is a song I wrote for my wife when I proposed to her. This song is an acoustic, classical guitar and my voice. No effects, no other tracks. Very different than “Come Out and Play.” This play of polarities is expressed throughout the album.

[embedded content]

Which bands or artists influence your work?

The biggest influences to my work are Pink Floyd, Dream Theater, Ayreon, Queensryche, Rush, Metallica and Andrew Lloyd Weber.

Do you see your music as serving a purpose beyond music?

Yes. It is my intention that my music inspires people to explore their own lives and contemplate how best to live to their full potential and break free of their own “Vicious Circle.” I also see this inspiring people who have put off their lifelong dream, deciding to take action to make it happen. This is why I chose to name my production company, Dream Reality Productions. Making this album was a dream I’ve had since I’m a young boy and now at 50, I made a decision and made it happen!

What are your future plans?

Right now I’m working diligently to spread the word to get the album out to the people. I have no immediate plans to tour or perform the album live, but I do see in the future a big theatrical production of the album like a Pink Floyd The Wall. Since I performed all the vocals and instruments on the album (except for the drums), I have to first get a band together.

I’m also starting to feel the spark of an idea of my next album. Stay tuned!

Samsarana is out now; order it from Barry Weinberg’s official website.

This news story was originally published here: https://www.prog-sphere.com/interviews/barry-weinberg-interview/
South Florida Prog Rock Songwriter BARRY WEINBERG Launches “Beyond the Astral Sky” Single

Barry Weinberg, a progressive rock songwriter from South Florida, recently launched his new album entitled ‘Samsarana,’ an effort that sees the artist exploring different soundscapes evolving around the personal experiences. In a new interview for Prog Sphere, Winberg talks about his vision with the album, the creative process behind it, and more.

Describe the musical vision propelling your new album Samsarana.

Like it says on the cover, my vision for Samsarana was a “Cinematic Rock Experience,” a movie for the ears, a musical novel with each song a chapter in an epic story of enlightenment and the breaking free of Samsarana – the endless cycle of birth, life and death – “This Vicious Circle.”

The album begins unconventionally with static – representing the chaos before creation. It is followed by a Big Bang and the orchestral music of “Conception” expresses the Universe coming into being. Consciousness emerges in “Creation” and so the story begins.

The working title of the album was “A God’s Tale” and I wanted to tell the story of a Universal Being creating the universe in order to experience itself, getting caught in the cycles of Karma and then breaking free.

What made it the right time to pursue that vision?

I started playing music when I was 12 and have always expressed myself best through songwriting. Many of the songs on the album I wrote at different times in my life. The earliest being “Beyond the Astral Sky” which I wrote when I was 18. (I’m soon to be 50!)

In 2006, I had the opportunity to write the soundtrack for a documentary film called “Florida Crackers: The Cowboys and Cattleman of Florida.” I heard about the project and submitted a song to the producer, he loved it and hired me. I wrote 18 songs for the film and for the first time had the experience of working in a professional music studio. I LOVED IT! It was at that time that the seed of Samsarana was planted. I thought to myself, “If I could do this for someone else, why not finally record MY music that I’ve worked on my whole life and share it with the WORLD!

Knowing how my creative process works, I felt that recording it at home would be much more effective for me than to go into a studio, so I started doing research and I put together a home studio over the course of the next year. Once everything was in place, I started laying down the tracks. As each song was recorded, I saw a story unfolding. I worked on it diligently for almost 10 years and in 2017 it was completed!

Barry Weinberg - Samsarana

Barry Weinberg – Samsarana

Tell me about what you’re communicating with the album cover.

In designing the artwork, I wanted to convey the idea of Creation, both musically and universally. Originally, I created a graphic of an eye floating out in space with a child reaching up to it. I sent it to my brother-in-law in Germany who is a graphic designer and the next day, he sent me back the image that is now on the cover. I loved it and we used it.

The album has a companion 13-page art and lyric booklet that is available for download when a person signs up for our fanclub on our website. In this booklet, each song has its own image in a similar style to the album cover.

What was the creative process for Samsarana like?

It was like simultaneously writing a novel, composing and arranging a film score and painting a picture. When starting this project, much of the music and lyrics were already written, but as I started recording, the music evolved beyond what I originally intended and new songs emerged to fill the gaps in the overall story of Samsarana.

The first thing people wonder when they hear about the album is “what kind of music is it?” Is it rock? Is it metal? Is it folk? The answer is yes. Besides the actual music and lyrics, I put a lot of attention on which style would best convey the message and mood of that song or “Chapter.” In fact, in some songs I combine genres and even transition from one to another. For example, “Endless Sea” starts off as a Bob Dylan-esque folk song evolves into more of a Bob Seger-y rock song and in the middle becomes an all out Grunge Metal breakout. It was a lot of fun to not be attached to any one genre and just express what needed to be expressed in the way it needed to be expressed.

Recording each song was like painting a picture. I’d first lay down the foundation with the basic tracks of percussion, bass, rhythm guitar and keyboards, if there were any. Then I’d add the lead guitars and vocals. I’d then listen to the song and in the context of the overall story, I’d add textures and effects to enhance the mood of the “scene.”

Is the dynamic flow of the pieces carefully architected?

Absolutely. Each song carries the story forward and between each song are sound recordings that bridge one song to the next. Another dynamic of the overall story is the influence of polarity in our lives. Love and Hate. Life and Death. Good and Evil. Therefore, I wanted to express this polarity using counterpoint between tones and genres between songs and sometimes within a song. For example, “Come Out and Play” is a fun, hard rock song about teenage crushes and the confusion we have as kids about what love is. This is followed by “A Passage of Time” which is a song I wrote for my wife when I proposed to her. This song is an acoustic, classical guitar and my voice. No effects, no other tracks. Very different than “Come Out and Play.” This play of polarities is expressed throughout the album.

[embedded content]

Which bands or artists influence your work?

The biggest influences to my work are Pink Floyd, Dream Theater, Ayreon, Queensryche, Rush, Metallica and Andrew Lloyd Weber.

Do you see your music as serving a purpose beyond music?

Yes. It is my intention that my music inspires people to explore their own lives and contemplate how best to live to their full potential and break free of their own “Vicious Circle.” I also see this inspiring people who have put off their lifelong dream, deciding to take action to make it happen. This is why I chose to name my production company, Dream Reality Productions. Making this album was a dream I’ve had since I’m a young boy and now at 50, I made a decision and made it happen!

What are your future plans?

Right now I’m working diligently to spread the word to get the album out to the people. I have no immediate plans to tour or perform the album live, but I do see in the future a big theatrical production of the album like a Pink Floyd The Wall. Since I performed all the vocals and instruments on the album (except for the drums), I have to first get a band together.

I’m also starting to feel the spark of an idea of my next album. Stay tuned!

Samsarana is out now; order it from Barry Weinberg’s official website.

This news story was originally published here: http://www.prog-sphere.com/specials/dream-theater-entering-studio-in-may/
DREAM THEATER Sign Record Deal with InsideOut Music

Dream Theater keyboardist Jordan Rudess shared an update regarding the follow-up to 2016′s The Astonishing, telling Vintage Rock:

We’re not gonna get into the studio until May. It’ll take some time to create it, and then once we’ve composed it all and recorded it all, and then to make all the packaging and all the stuff, and who knows?

It’ll probably come out, let’s say, in a year or so, or maybe a little less. And we’ll hit the road sometime after that. But May is the time when we’re looking to get in the studio again.

Jordan also discussed the band’s creative process, saying:

What’s interesting in my career with Dream Theater is that when we set out to record an album, first of all, we always have a very strong concept of what it’s gonna be before we start – we kind of envision the music, we envision the effect, we make a real plan and try to follow through with that.

One of the things that happened with ‘The Astonishing,’ which is our last album, which is kind of like a rock-opera thing, is that we actually had many more ideas than we used.

A lot of times we’ll apply ourselves to the album knowing what we wanna do, and what we create is what happened. So there’s not a lot… you know, you hear about bands, ‘Oh, that song is on the cutting-room floor.’ Or, ‘We threw that one away.’ ‘That one didn’t work.’ ‘The record company said this or that.’

But with us, it’s not usually like that. But for ‘The Astonishing,’ we did have a lot of ideas that we didn’t use — not because they were necessarily not good ideas, but because we were trying to really craft something that helped to tell the story.

So maybe something just didn’t work as well. So we have some things kind of in the can or whatever – they’re nice ideas that weren’t part of it.

This news story was originally published here: https://www.prog-sphere.com/specials/dream-theater-entering-studio-in-may/
DREAM THEATER Sign Record Deal with InsideOut Music

Dream Theater keyboardist Jordan Rudess shared an update regarding the follow-up to 2016′s The Astonishing, telling Vintage Rock:

We’re not gonna get into the studio until May. It’ll take some time to create it, and then once we’ve composed it all and recorded it all, and then to make all the packaging and all the stuff, and who knows?

It’ll probably come out, let’s say, in a year or so, or maybe a little less. And we’ll hit the road sometime after that. But May is the time when we’re looking to get in the studio again.

Jordan also discussed the band’s creative process, saying:

What’s interesting in my career with Dream Theater is that when we set out to record an album, first of all, we always have a very strong concept of what it’s gonna be before we start – we kind of envision the music, we envision the effect, we make a real plan and try to follow through with that.

One of the things that happened with ‘The Astonishing,’ which is our last album, which is kind of like a rock-opera thing, is that we actually had many more ideas than we used.

A lot of times we’ll apply ourselves to the album knowing what we wanna do, and what we create is what happened. So there’s not a lot… you know, you hear about bands, ‘Oh, that song is on the cutting-room floor.’ Or, ‘We threw that one away.’ ‘That one didn’t work.’ ‘The record company said this or that.’

But with us, it’s not usually like that. But for ‘The Astonishing,’ we did have a lot of ideas that we didn’t use — not because they were necessarily not good ideas, but because we were trying to really craft something that helped to tell the story.

So maybe something just didn’t work as well. So we have some things kind of in the can or whatever – they’re nice ideas that weren’t part of it.