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All posts for the month March, 2020

THE PROGRESSIVE TRACKS SHOW #357 (The Topical Show)

I prepare these editions of The Progressive Tracks Show well ahead of time, but I do believe I may have come up with a topical show just this once.  Check it out to see, while listening to some excellent music!

PLAYLIST:

  • Zopp – “Zero” from Zopp on Bad Elephant Music (2020)
  • Churn Milk Joan – “He Was The First Person…” from I’m Nearly 60 Miles High on Independent (2019)
  • Loosense – “Capital I” from Saloon on Camaleao (2019)
  • Rantama – “Bird Nest” from Rantama on Eclipse Music (2020)
  • Cheer-Accident – “Death By Polyanna” from No Ifs, And Or Dogs on Cuneiform (2011)
  • Tiger Moth Tales – “The Boy Who Cried Wolf” from A Visit to Zoetermeer on White Knight Records (2020)
  • Zzebra – “Panic” from Zzebra/Panic on Angel Air Records (2010)
  • El Tubo Elastico – “Pandora” from En Directo on Independent (2020)
  • Horse Lords – “Fanfare For Effective Freedom” from The Common Task on Northern Spy Records  (2020)
  • Cheer-Accident – “This Is The New That” from No Ifs, And Or Dogs on Cuneiform (2011)
  • Rantama – “A Blink of Light” from Rantama on Eclipse Music (2020)
  • Churn Milk Joan – “Plexus & Pylori” from I Live In Your Stomach on Independent (2020)
  • Zopp – “Swedish Love” from Zopp on Bad Elephant Music (2020)
  • Zopp – “Before The Light” from Zopp on Bad Elephant Music (2020)

If you have comments or suggestions for show topics/ music (always welcome), feel free to contact me any time via email:  ProgTracks@KPTZ.org

And remember, you can access podcasts of any previous Progressive Tracks Show at: http://www.progzilla.com/?s=progressive+tracks (there are almost 200 podcasts now!).

Most importantly, SUBSCRIBE TO THE PODCAST below, so you’ll have it delivered to your fingertips weekly! ˅˅˅˅˅˅˅˅

This news story was originally published here: http://www.insideoutmusic.com/newsdetailed.aspx?IdNews=24081&IdCompany=8

Kansas, America’s legendary progressive rock band, will release their highly anticipated new studio album “The Absence of Presence” on June 26, 2020. The band gave fans a sneak preview of what they can expect to hear on the album with this sampler video: https://youtu.be/PjIX7SC0nQM 

“We are really excited for our fans to be able to get a taste of what is to come from ‘The Absence of Presence,'” says KANSAS lead vocalist Ronnie Platt. “I think people will really be surprised by the album. ‘The Absence of Presence’ shows the band firing on all cylinders.”

“The Absence of Presence” follows-up 2016’s “The Prelude Implicit,” which debuted at #14 on Billboard’s Top 200 Albums chart. KANSAS has sold more than 30 million albums worldwide, and is famous for classic hits such as ‘Carry On Wayward Son’ and ‘Dust in the Wind’ to the progressive epic ‘Song for America.’

“The Absence of Presence,” released by Inside Out Music, features nine all new tracks written by the band, produced by Zak Rizvi, and co-produced by Phil Ehart and Richard Williams. KANSAS’s signature sound is unmistakable throughout. The album showcases Ronnie Platt’s towering vocals, David Ragsdale’s searing violin, Tom Brislin’s dazzling keyboards, Williams and Rizvi’s electrifying guitar riffs, Ehart’s powerful drums, and Billy Greer’s rocking bass.

“We are really proud of the album ‘The Absence of Presence,'” comments KANSAS guitarist, producer, and songwriter Zak Rizvi. “Making a new KANSAS album sets a very high musical standard that is expected from our fans. From rockers, to progressive epics, to ballads, there is something on this recording for everybody.”

“The Absence of Presence” will be released June 26, 2020, on Inside Out Music. The album will be available on CD, Double LP 180 Gram Vinyl, Limited Edition Deluxe CD + 5.1 Blu-Ray Artbook, and as a digital album. Pre-order opportunities begin on the 17th April via KansasBand.com & other outlets.

“The Absence of Presence” Track Listing:
1.) The Absence of Presence
2.) Throwing Mountains
3.) Jets Overhead
4.) Propulsion 1
5.) Memories Down the Line
6.) Circus of Illusion
7.) Animals on the Roof
8.) Never
9.) The Song the River Sang

KANSAS will debut a song off “The Absence of Presence” this summer during Foreigner’s Juke Box Heroes 2020 Tour. More songs off the album will be performed during this fall’s Point of Know Return Anniversary European Tour. For more information on KANSAS, “The Absence of Presence,” The Point of Know Return Anniversary European Tour, The Point of Know Return Anniversary Tour, or the Juke Box Heroes 2020 tour, please visit: www.kansasband.com

Point of Know Return Anniversary European Tour Dates
18.10.2020 – (UK) London, Palladium
20.10.2020 – (DE) Frankfurt, Jahrhunderthalle
21.10.2020 – (DE) Hamburg, Docks
23.10.2020 – (FI) Tampere, Tamperetalo
24.10.2020 – (FI) Helsinki, Culture House
26.10.2020 – (SE) Stockholm, Cirkus
27.10.2020 – (NO) Oslo, Sentrum Scene
29.10.2020 – (DE) Berlin, Tempodrom
31.10.2020 – (BE) Brussels, Cirque Royal
03.11.2020 – (DE) Munich, Circus Krone
05.11.2020 – (DE) Heilbronn, Harmonie
09.11.2020 – (DE) Bochum, RuhrCongress
10.11.2020 – (NL) Amsterdam, Carre Theatre

KANSAS online:
www.kansasband.com
www.facebook.com/kansasband
www.twitter.com/kansasband

This news story was originally published here: https://theprogressiveaspect.net/blog/2020/03/30/34016/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=34016

There’s an expression a lot of my musicals friends use that explains well what happens when one is introduced to something new: ‘the rabbit hole’. For when you first find yourself listening to something new and exciting, it’s only natural to want to hear more, or similar, and so you find yourself falling down that rabbit hole. I recently found a rabbit hole of my own, after a sponsored post on Facebook led me to listen to French fusion band Daïda. Now, the thing about a rabbit hole is that it is but one entrance to a huge sprawling warren, with many paths to follow. My path led me to Tao Ehrlich, as on searching for a YouTube video to accompany my A Different Aspect review for Daïda, that which I found featured Ehrlich.

‘Who was Tao Ehrlich?’, I wondered – and so my wander through the warren of French fusion began. I had no idea that the Parisian fusion scene was so vibrant, but it most certainly is, and Tao Ehrlich appears to be a star of the scene. Although it would be an exaggeration to say he is omnipresent, he certainly has played with many different acts over time. Ehrlich is a product of musical nature and nurture. Due to his musician father, Ehrlich grew up in a musical environment and from a very young age was on stages, learning from and playing with many musicians.

I began my tour of the Parisian fusion scene with Panam Panic, which Ehrlich also plays for, and listened to many other varied and wonderful bands (including Bordelophone, 4dB, Chromatik, Aldorand, Camarão Orkestra, and Chlorine Free), before arriving at Ishkero. The band has self-released two EPs, and their third is due for release in April on Chuwanaga. Brume is easily the best release yet from Ishkero. It’s an absolute joy to listen to!

Ishkero is a group of five experienced and enthusiastic musicians who have been playing together for a while now, and it shows. But with all due respect to the other musicians in the band, from the off, it’s Tao Ehrlich’s drumming that stands out. In fact, it is appropriate that in French we would probably be describing his battery, as Ehrlich provides an explosive energy, the shockwave of which radiates underneath the remainder of the band. The band feed off this energy, and the resulting music is a joy to listen to – and it sounds as if the band finds it a joy to play.

So we have guitarist Victor Gasq, who is clearly as comfortable in rhythm as he is soloing. Some very nifty riffs from Gasq. Adrien Dutertre is on the flute, managing to impose quite some presence and personality with his instrument. He also adds texture with percussion. Antoine Vidal plays the bass, sometimes modestly, sometimes mischievously. I have always had an affinity for the bass, and Vidal’s playing definitely tickles my fancy. Finally, on keys, Arnaud Forestier adds a tableau of poetic prettiness. With some gorgeous saxophone from guest musician Jeff Mercadié on two of the tracks, the recipe is complete. And the end result is most definitely delicious!

Brian Eno once said, “There were three great beats in the ’70s: Fela Kuti’s Afrobeat, James Brown’s funk, and Klaus Dinger’s Neu!-beat.” It sounds to me that Tao Ehrlich seeks to integrate all three into his playing. The first track from Brume, Triple B, is certainly full of ’70s funk influences, and it’s an absolute blast. I dare anyone to listen to this, and not at least tap their feet. Me? I was dancing around the kitchen with my second youngest child. By the time you’ve reached the end of this too short release, you’re definitely more in Afrobeat territory – in particular, Gnawa rhythms.

I love the introduction to second track Tonik Gin which sounds as laid-back as you might expect. Ehrlich comes in with the beat, and we’re away. The flute, guitar and keys trade licks in a delightful way, building and building until everything falls away at about the three-minute mark. I love the minimalist, almost ambient soundscape that is left, before being built up once more to a glorious finale. This track may not be as immediately gratifying as Triple B, but repeated listens really show it’s many layers. Also, I love that final chord.

Brume comes in quietly like the mist its title implies, the gentle sounds washing over the listener before the track kicks in after about a minute. I say kicks in, but the title track is the gentlest on the EP. That’s not to say it’s boring, though. It’s actually incredibly evocative of a misty day, with the music sounding suitably hazy (it’s described as “warm and hazy” on the Bandcamp page). The beat picks up in the final moment, which is actually for me the most disappointing moment of the EP, as I was thoroughly enjoying the mood of the piece before then. But I’m quite sure a lot of people will like this quite dramatic coda to the piece. (NB: I don’t dislike it at all, but it just feels out of place.)

Gate de l’Ouest is an impressive closing number. The EP is definitely structured with the bigger, bolder pieces as bookends, with the more intricate and layered pieces providing a softer centre. As aforementioned, this track is a jazzy take on Gnawa rhythms, or at least, that’s how it seems to me. In Gnawa music, one phrase or beat is repeated over and over, as the music is spiritual, and designed to help provoke a trance. That one phrase or beat can be approached from many angles, and that’s what Gard de l’Ouest seems to do. It’s too easy to get lost in the music, and thoroughly frustrating when it ends so soon. If any track could have gone on (and on), it would be this one. I suspect played live, it possibly does, and the length of the track on this EP is more down to keeping consistent the lengths of the two sides of the vinyl release.

In short, I guess my only complaint about this EP is that it is just that – short. I can’t wait to hear a full-length release from Ishkero, and I hope one is forthcoming. I am so happy I fell down this rabbit hole. My thanks to Daïda for giving me the push.

TRACK LISTING
01. Triple B (3:09)
02. Tonik Gin (5:48)
03. Brume (6:00)
04. Gare de l’Ouest (4:53)

MUSICIANS
Tao Ehrlich – Drums & percussion
Antoine Vidal – Bass
Adrien “Dridri” Duterte – Flute, Percussion
Victor Gasq – Guitar, Upright Piano (on Gare de l’Ouest)
Arnaud Forestier – Keyboards
~ With:
Jeff Mercadié – Tenor Saxophone (on Triple B and Gare de l’Ouest)

ADDITIONAL INFO
Record Label: Chuwanaga
Country of Origin: France
Date of Release: 20the April 2020

LINKS
Ishkero – Facebook | YouTube | Bandcamp (for their first two EP releases) | Bandcamp (for Brume)

This news story was originally published here: http://www.insideoutmusic.com/newsdetailed.aspx?IdNews=24077&IdCompany=8

In 2019, PATTERN-SEEKING ANIMALS, the California-based band featuring Ted Leonard (lead vocals & guitars), Jimmy Keegan (drums & vocals), Dave Meros (bass) and John Boegehold (keyboards), presented its much-lauded eponymous debut.
Just a year later, the group releases its second opus, “Prehensile Tales”, to be released through InsideOutMusic on May 15th, 2020.

As a first track from the forthcoming new album, PATTERN-SEEKING ANIMALS now reveal ‘Here In My Autumn’, John Boegehold comments:
The tale of a man clinging to a chapter in his life that’s become impossible to return to yet impossible to forget. Of course that describes much of life itself, doesn’t it?

Watch the clip for ‘Here In My Autumn’ on YT: https://youtu.be/m5mgpcOgFws

For the six songs on the album (the longest clocking in at over 17 minutes), the band introduced violin, flute, trumpet, cello, sax and pedal steel to the sound palette that was once again recorded & mixed by Rich Mouser at The Mouse House.

The track-listing reads as follows:
1. Raining Hard In Heaven
2. Here In My Autumn
3. Elegant Vampires
4. Why Don’t We Run
5. Lifeboat
6. Soon But Not Today

The album, featuring cover art by Polish artist Mirek (https://www.facebook.com/mirekis7/), will be released as Gatefold 2LP plus CD, Limited Edition CD, and on all digital platforms. Presales are now available!
To pre-order, stream, download “Prehensile Tales”, just click
https://patternseekinganimals.lnk.to/PrehensileTalesID

PATTERN-SEEKING ANIMALS online:
http://PSAnimals1.com
http://Facebook.com/psanimals1 
https://twitter.com/psanimals1 
https://www.instagram.com/psanimals1/ 

This news story was originally published here: https://www.prog-sphere.com/reviews/garganjua-toward-the-sun-review/

There’s a real vulnerability to Toward the Sun, the third studio album by Leicester doom metal quartet Garganjua. The group’s form of doom metal has been stripped completely to its core elements, and in doing so, it’s become its own entity that encapsulates a much clearer vision.

It’s easy to see on a surface level that Garganjua took many of the key elements of the genre’s stalwarts: the soaring vocal melodies, the slow moving guitar melodies (not really riffs), the arguably simple structures, and so on. When put on screen like this, it seems that not much has changed for the long-standing music style. If anything, Toward the Sun is testament to just how much a focus shift can change the very chemistry of sound. Make absolutely no mistake—this is and this is not a doom metal album. The guitars here are far cleaner with only a slight haze of fuzzy overdrive, and the melodies are almost all primarily in singers’ vocals, the instrumentation (though intricate if you look closely) simply intended as a backdrop to the subject matter and mood. If you’re afraid of this change, you likely aren’t the intended audience.

Toward the Sun, oddly, sounds like the full realization of the music that Garganjua have wanted to make for years. When you look closer at the progression between the three albums, one can easily be surprised that the band didn’t sound as they do in 2020 much earlier. From meeting that expectation, Toward the Sun feels so much more honest. There’s a serious challenge involved with objectively reviewing something that seems so stripped bare of facade; so naked and upfront, whilst simultaneously being enshrouded in an enigmatic haze. There is a far deeper emotional pool on Toward the Sun the band draws from, far beyond what you could discern from face value.

With much more robust song structures, Toward the Sun feels less sequential and moves much more freely between the pieces. Garganjua’s compositions have always had a tendency to revel in a singular vibe for each song’s runtime, but the far more natural mood shifts mean you seldom know where any given track might take you. The sparser, airier sound palette also gives the band members a lot more space to work with when it comes to letting these songs wander through differentiating sections. The gradual shifts in “Mire” is quite the emotional journey, subduing the listener into a pensive state. Even the subtle building in tracks like “Transcendence” and “Light Bearer” seem far more noticeable in this album’s context. In turn, there’s a real vastness to this record that neither 2016’s A Voyage in Solitude or 2018’s Through the Void couldn’t quite reach.

Toward the Sun works like a living, breathing organism, where each aspect is vital to the “life” of the album. Those who experience it will have a difficult time forgetting it.

Toward the Sun is out now via Holy Roar Records; order it from Bandcamp here. Follow Garganjua on Facebook.

Garganjua - Toward the Sun

The post Album Review: Garganjua – Toward the Sun appeared first on Prog Sphere.

This news story was originally published here: http://www.prog-sphere.com/reviews/garganjua-toward-the-sun-review/

There’s a real vulnerability to Toward the Sun, the third studio album by Leicester doom metal quartet Garganjua. The group’s form of doom metal has been stripped completely to its core elements, and in doing so, it’s become its own entity that encapsulates a much clearer vision.

It’s easy to see on a surface level that Garganjua took many of the key elements of the genre’s stalwarts: the soaring vocal melodies, the slow moving guitar melodies (not really riffs), the arguably simple structures, and so on. When put on screen like this, it seems that not much has changed for the long-standing music style. If anything, Toward the Sun is testament to just how much a focus shift can change the very chemistry of sound. Make absolutely no mistake—this is and this is not a doom metal album. The guitars here are far cleaner with only a slight haze of fuzzy overdrive, and the melodies are almost all primarily in singers’ vocals, the instrumentation (though intricate if you look closely) simply intended as a backdrop to the subject matter and mood. If you’re afraid of this change, you likely aren’t the intended audience.

Toward the Sun, oddly, sounds like the full realization of the music that Garganjua have wanted to make for years. When you look closer at the progression between the three albums, one can easily be surprised that the band didn’t sound as they do in 2020 much earlier. From meeting that expectation, Toward the Sun feels so much more honest. There’s a serious challenge involved with objectively reviewing something that seems so stripped bare of facade; so naked and upfront, whilst simultaneously being enshrouded in an enigmatic haze. There is a far deeper emotional pool on Toward the Sun the band draws from, far beyond what you could discern from face value.

With much more robust song structures, Toward the Sun feels less sequential and moves much more freely between the pieces. Garganjua’s compositions have always had a tendency to revel in a singular vibe for each song’s runtime, but the far more natural mood shifts mean you seldom know where any given track might take you. The sparser, airier sound palette also gives the band members a lot more space to work with when it comes to letting these songs wander through differentiating sections. The gradual shifts in “Mire” is quite the emotional journey, subduing the listener into a pensive state. Even the subtle building in tracks like “Transcendence” and “Light Bearer” seem far more noticeable in this album’s context. In turn, there’s a real vastness to this record that neither 2016’s A Voyage in Solitude or 2018’s Through the Void couldn’t quite reach.

Toward the Sun works like a living, breathing organism, where each aspect is vital to the “life” of the album. Those who experience it will have a difficult time forgetting it.

Toward the Sun is out now via Holy Roar Records; order it from Bandcamp here. Follow Garganjua on Facebook.

Garganjua - Toward the Sun

The post Album Review: Garganjua – Toward the Sun appeared first on Prog Sphere.

Tales From The Tiger Moth

Edition 115

Broadcast 28th March 2020

Pendragon – 360 Degrees
Tom Slatter – Happy People
Steve Hughes – Downhilling
Steve Thorne – Monkey Business
Chimpan A – The World Through My Eyes
Karfagen – Spring (Birds Delight)
Kenneth Williams – Buy British
Texle – Modus Operandi
George Harrison – Out Of The Blue
Van Der Graaf Generator – A Plague Of Lighthouse Keepers
Anathema – Sunlight
Jethro Tull – Broadford Bazaar
The News Huddlines – Passion Killer Classics
John Holden – Dark Arts
Red Bazar – Liar
The Bardic Depths – The End
Chimpan A – Scream
Pendragon – Starfish And The Moon
John Beagley – Make It Stop
I’m Sorry I’ll Read That Again – Audible Road Signs
Jordan Rudess – What Four
Genesis – Abacab

KRAZZ LOFT VINYL SHOW

Broadcast 29th March  2020

 

1.    The House on the Hill Audience
2.    Bound and Determined Marshall Tucker Band
3.    The Cure/Devil In Disguise Green Desert Tree
4.    Flying Dutchman Jethro Tull
5.    Lamplight Symphony Kansas
East Coast Rockers  
6.    For You Bruce Springsteen
7.    Walk on the Wild Side Lou Reed
8.    Kimberly Patti Smith
9.    Adam’s Apple Aerosmith
60’s 6-Pack  
10. Hush Deep Purple
11. Break On Through to the Other Side The Doors
12. 51st Anniversary Jimi Hendrix
13. Don’t Bring Me Down The Animals
14. Last Train to Clarksville The Monkees
15. Eight Miles High The Byrds
16. Diamonds Rare Bird
17. The Night The Carousel Burned Down Todd Rundgren
18. Lost in My Dream Spooky Tooth
19. Renegade Styx
20. And You and I Yes
21. Isn’t Life Strange Moody Blues
SIAS: Steve Miller’s “Circle of Love” side 2  
22. Macho City Steve Miller
23. Haunting Balance
24. C’est Le Bon Supertramp
25. Sun/C79 Cat Stevens
26. Crossroads/You Can’t Catch Me Stephen Stills
Here Come the Horns  
27. Understanding Cold Blood
28. Take It Slow (Out in the Country) Lighthouse
29. Don’t Change Horses (in the Middle of a Stream) Tower of Power
30. Wine Electric Flag
31. Hard Woman Mick Jagger
32. Roll em Easy Linda Ronstadt
33. Midnight Rider Allman Brothers
34. Seven Bridges Road Eagles
Jazz It Up!  
35. Phase Dancer Pat Metheny
36. Blues on the Corner Dance of the Universe Orch
37. Shootout at the Fantasy Factory Traffic
38. Stand Up Santana
Chillin’ Down with Hits from Early 70’s  
39. I’d Love To Change the World Ten Years After
40. Box of Rain Grateful Dead
41. Déjà vu Crosby Stills Nash & Young
42. Ride Out: Watchin’ the River Flow Steve Gadd

 

 

If you want to get in touch with Alan about requests or the show please use

Krazzloft@yahoo.com

Edition 203 of THE PROG MILL for Progzilla Radio (423 in total), first broadcast 29 March 2020, is now also available to stream on demand or download. Two hours of superb melodic and symphonic progressive rock. Including the latest album review from The Progressive Aspect and a chance to win TWO superb progressive rock CD’s.

Here’s This Week’s Playlist

1 Lesoir – Mosaic (Mosaic)
2 Scarled – Factory (Single)
3 The Forty Days – John’s Pool (The Colour of Change)
4 The Quiet Life Project – For All We Know (Catastrophic Futures)
5 Red Sand – Dust & Hope (Crush the Seed)
6 Bad Dreams – Red Moon (Frozen Heart)
7 Magic Pie – P & C (Fragments of the 5th Element)
8 Outstation – Neptune 17 (The End of All Songs)
9 Ms Amy Birks – Unlike The Heart (All That I Am and All That I Was)
10 Rick Miller – Correct to the Core (Belief in the Machine)
11 Martin Turner & Geoff Downes – Lucky Man (A Tribute to Keith Emerson & Greg Lake)
12 The Tea Party – Time (Alhambra)
13 David Sancious – Ever the Same (True Stories)
14 Budgie – Parents (Never Turn Your Back on a Friend)

You can hear The Prog Mill on Progzilla Radio at these times every week (www.progzilla.com/listen – via the tune in and other internet radio apps and platforms – or just ask Alexa to “Play Radio Progzilla on Tune-In”) :

Sundays 10pm – Midnight UK (2200UTC) – main broadcast
Tuesdays 0300-0500 UK (0300UTC) – For North America – Mon 7pm Pacific/10pm Eastern
Tuesdays 2300-0100UK (2300 UTC) – 1500 Pacific/1800 Eastern
Saturdays 6-8pm UK (1800 UTC) – Family friendly Saturday evening repeat

Your melodic and symphonic progressive rock music suggestions for the show are very welcome. Just email shaun@progzilla.com, or message via twitter @shaunontheair or facebook.com/theprogmill

This news story was originally published here: https://theprogressiveaspect.net/blog/2020/03/29/brian-davisons-every-which-way-every-which-way-remastered-50th-anniversary-edition/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=brian-davisons-every-which-way-every-which-way-remastered-50th-anniversary-edition

An album that forms an interesting stitch in Rock’s Rich Tapestry™ is the sole album recorded by Brian Davison and the group he assembled after being cast aside by Keith Emerson as the latter strove to find musical egos as big as his in his quest for world dominance. I was going to speculate as to whether Davison felt at all bitter, watching as his musical partner since 1965 and co-founder of The Nice went on to pastures richer. Now I’ve read the original PR blurb from the time, which is reproduced in the CD booklet, I think my question has been answered, and then some!

“The trouble with supergroups is that they’re so damned super. Few psyches can survive that open return on the great ego trip. Thus it has become the unfortunate modus operandi of so many superstars to fall back and regroup with as super an assemblage of confederates as possible. Each superego is nursed back to health – or is it wealth?” Needless to say, “Every Which Way isn’t a supergroup”. And that’s only a snippet!

Well, that leaves us in no doubt, and you can but sympathise with the discarded drummer. Davison based his new project around singer-songwriter Graham Bell, and other musicians all of whom he had met several times criss-crossing the UK with The Nice. The resultant band is more Graham Bell’s than Davison’s as he sings and writes most of the songs on this fairly laid back shuffle through blues and R&B-based introspection. Here, the album is released as a 50the Anniversary remaster by that fine musical museum, Esoteric Recordings, who continue to unearth forgotten relics with the love and care of the true archaeologist.

There is an air of perhaps understandable melancholy hanging over the first two tracks, and you can imagine this record getting a lot of play in smoke-filled student bedsits all over this land in the early seventies. The first nine-and-a-half minute languorous excursion, Bed Ain’t What It Used To Be, and its following number, the even more laid back Castle Sand, set this scene perfectly. Graham Bell, as well as being an expressive but never overbearing vocalist, is also a decent pianist and rhythm guitarist, and with bassist Alan Cartwright and Davison form a solid and dependable backline for the two leads, reeds man Geoffrey Peach, and lead guitarist John Hedley, who has to wait until the fourth track All In Time before he can show us what he’s capable of.

A smidgeon of optimism allows itself expression in Go Placidly, “It’s still a beautiful world” sings Bell as the song unfolds in classic early ’70s singer-songwriter style. Let’s be certain, no musical trees are being uprooted on this record, you get the impression Davison is happy to have left the growing bombast well behind him. The last two tracks are heavier, in a jazz rock vein, with an occasionally angry but mostly world-weary undercurrent and a hopefully deliberate scuzzy vibe. The final track The Light is probably the best, being the most complete musical statement on the album, with the whole band getting right into its dirty groove.

The band died on the vine due to punter and promoter apathy, and only lasted four months or so from September 1970 when the album was released to the split in January 1971, due in part to the inevitable “musical differences”, and the fact that bassist Alan Cartwright was made an offer he couldn’t refuse by Procol Harum. An interesting curio, Brian Davison’s Every Which Way was probably not distinctive enough to make an impression in an age when the highways and byways of the UK were nose-to-tail with battered Transits full of hairies trying to scrape a living on the road.

Davison went on to form the rather fine Refugee with Patrick Moraz and his old Nice colleague Lee Jackson, so he still had some prog in him! Graham Bell made the “famous if you’re a record collector” Bell + Arc album, a staple of cut out bins in the mid-’70s, a fate it hardly deserved in my opinion.

One for the Students of Rock.

TRACK LISTING
01. Bed Ain’t What It Used To Be (9:29)
02. Castle Sand (6:47)
03. Go Placidly (3:50)
04. All In Time (8:52)
05. What You Like (3:41)
06. The Light (6:16)

Total Time – 38:59

MUSICIANS
Brian Davison – Drums, Percussion
Graham Bell – Electric Piano, Acoustic Guitar, Lead Vocals
Geoffrey Peach – Reeds, Flute, Backing Vocals
Alan Cartwright – Bass Guitar
John Hedley – Lead Guitar

ADDITIONAL INFO
Record Label: Esoteric Recordings
Country of Origin: U.K.
Date of Release: 31st January 2020 (Originally released in 1970)

LINKS
Brian Davison – Cherry Red Records Info | Facebook Cherry Red