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All posts for the month October, 2019

This news story was originally published here: https://www.prog-sphere.com/interviews/within-progress-interview/

Thessaloniki, Greece based progressive rock/metal quintet Within Progress was formed in 2017. The band recorded their debut EP ‘Oceans of Time‘ same year, and released it in April 2018. While the group is currently working on songs for their upcoming full-length release, we featured a song from a debut EP on our latest Progotronics compilation, and as a result of that we talked with the band about their work.

Define the mission of Within Progress.

We are five very different people who came together from our love of music. We don’t “do” genres, we gather together to write music we love and want to hear, and we think that it has a potential for something unique, because of how different each one of our personality and mindset is. Our mission is to get that across to as many people as we can.

Tell me about the creative process that informed your debut EP “Oceans of Time” and the themes it captures.

“Oceans of Time” is the collection of the best songs we ever tried to write together as a band. The basis of all songs was written by only two of current members and an ex-guitarist who would get together 1-2 times per week and see what kind of music they could compose together. Since the current line-up was completed very shortly before we started recording, many things were re-written during the sessions. Music always came before lyrics and it’s almost always like that for us as we are more expressive with music than with lyrics. We also didn’t have a singer during the majority of the time that the songs were being written so what you hear on the EP are mainly guitar/riff driven compositions with vocals placed on top as efficiently as we could. It was the first serious songwriting attempt for all us and we think we got a very stellar result.

The themes that “Oceans of Time” captures are mainly based on negative aspects of modern day society, with a slight emphasis on certain human behaviors and patterns, and how those cause hostility and alienation in our relationships. For example, we question the beliefs of parents that are passed on to their children at an age when they haven’t developed their own free will or how sometimes we would rather appear knowledgeable to impress our peers than admitting that we in fact know very little of that certain subject.

What is the message you are trying to give with “Oceans of Time”?

It’s always more controversial when someone speaks about the negative side of things and provokes people and lyrically we wanted to do just that. To make people aware of these situations, acknowledge that they’re there, they’re real and they affect our daily lives, and try to better ourselves and our relationships with each other in spite of them.

Musically, “Oceans of Time” is a kind of “we’re here” statement. We wanted to introduce ourselves to the scene with just a small taste before we set on to release more ambitious things.

How did you document the music while it was being formulated?

We would always write everything on software and orchestrate the songs from the computer first before we played them live in the studio. There’s an upside and a downside in doing this. We chose to work in this manner because of the nature of progressive music. For example, you can’t go in the studio and suddenly jam syncopated riffs in odd time signatures from scratch. You have to actually see everything written down on paper or on screen. So each new idea was first written on sheet music on the computer and we worked our way up from there. Usually the guitar was the driving force of the songs except for the song “Oceans of Time” in which the drums were written first.

The downside of our approach to songwriting is that the music isn’t as spontaneous as it could be if it was written while rehearsing. We try to balance the two approaches when we write music now.

Oceans of Time

Is the dynamic flow of the pieces carefully architected?

The fact that the pieces are carefully architected is a bit of an understatement (haha), and we don’t mean that in a pretentious way. The songs are most definitely not perfect but we’re not the kind of band that writes a song in a few hours and calls it a day. The basic structure of the song could be written in a short amount of time but it takes weeks before we’re happy with the end result. We always ask ourselves “How could this part be better?” or “Is this section really as good as it can be?”. For “Oceans of Time”, many sections were re-arranged and re-written, parts were erased or added, even during the recording sessions, while always serving the song.

Describe the approach to recording the EP.

We recorded the EP in Fireball Music Studio in Thessaloniki. We had already decided which 5 songs we would include in the album. Before recording we listened to the songs with the producer from demos we had made ourselves and some others in MIDI form. He offered some suggestions for the songs themselves and for how we would approach recording.

Drums & percussion were recorded first in 3 days followed by guitars, bass and piano/synths. Because of the two bassists that came before our current one, the bass parts were the ones that suffered the most alterations during the process as they did not fit well with the drums so many things were changed on the spot. Finally vocals came last and took the longest. Our singer actually recorded the entire album in a day but decided to erase the whole thing and redo everything as he wasn’t happy with the result. During recording, at least two band members were present to offer suggestions and help so no one actually recorded alone. Our producer helped us hugely in both the compositional side of things as well as the recording process itself and we took his advice when we thought that it improved the song. That was the case in many different occasions. It was the first official recording session for all of us during which we discovered how different the studio is from a live setting but we also grasped our capabilities as musicians in our own respective instruments.

How long was “Oceans of Time” in the making?

The songs were written in a year although some ideas existed long before. The recording sessions for drums, guitars took place in July 2017 while bass, piano/synths and vocals went on during the autumn of 2017. The album was mixed and mastered by Joe FK by February 2018 and the first song was released in March with the entire album release in April 2018. In general, the entire album was almost a year and a half in the making, from the songwriting to the mastering stage.

Which bands or artists influenced your work on the release?

The songs were being written while the main songwriters of the band were out of their heavy metal phase and into discovering more and more progressive bands. So you can expect the “classic” Tool, Dream Theater, Porcupine Tree influence on the music as well as more modern examples like Tesseract, Leprous, Mastodon & Gojira and also Hans Zimmer on the track “Celestial Notion”. A lot of our guitar work was actually inspired by Greek traditional music where odd time signatures and a lot of “eastern” sounding melodies are commonplace. That theme is actually very upfront on the record and many people have noticed it.

What is your view on technology in music?

We live in an age where you can take basically any sound and manipulate or process it in any way you see fit. With that fact alone, the sky is the limit when it comes to making music which to us is unbelievably fascinating. We’re big fans of using effects or plugins, reversed sounds and processed audio in an unconventional way just to see what sound they make and how that can be used musically. All that is now at your fingertips, at a click of a button and with basic computer knowledge, anyone can try it. Also, thanks to technology anyone can record and produce music even with a very low budget which also means that there is more music being released today than ever before. It really is exhausting to think how much music is out there and so much of it is really good!

There’s absolutely no way that you won’t find something to your liking.
That being said, it is so easy to use technology nowadays to edit your playing and alter your sound into something that you haven’t thought about how you’ll play or recreate live. That to us is a big mistake as you can easily reassure yourself that you’ll fix it in the editing stage or in the mix when you actually haven’t played the part as well as you could. It is fun to use technology to our advantage but let’s not forget that we’re people who play music live.

Within Progress live

Do you see your music as serving a purpose beyond music?

Of course we do. Music is for so much more than just listening. It makes you feel things that no other medium can make you feel. It’s raw and pure emotion and it can be cathartic. When you haven’t had the best day, a small piece of lyric behind beautiful harmony can change that. When you’re happy, a happy song can amplify your feelings. It can simply get you in the right frame of mind when you want to accomplish goals. Music (as well as film) is one of the most powerful ways to deliver a message or story and (cliché aside) it really does bring people together because it is culturally universal, whether it is a 20-minute long progressive metal symphony or a 3 minute pop song.

What are your plans for the future?

We are currently writing songs for our first full-length album and there are a lot of exciting and new ideas! So many that some will have to go to the 2nd album or later releases. It is the first time the entire current line-up is in the same room composing music from scratch together so the result will be quite different from “Oceans of Time”. We’re also thinking about how we will release our LP and so far we have just been brainstorming ideas. When it comes to gigs, we have put that on hold right now as finishing our album is priority number one and we want it to be as good as it possibly can. However we’re always on the lookout for live shows that can get us exposure to more people (so far in Greece).

Thank you for having us and for the very nice questions!

Oceans of Time is available from Bandcamp here. Follow Within Progress on Facebook and Instagram.

The post WITHIN PROGRESS: Different Mindsets appeared first on Prog Sphere.

This news story was originally published here: http://www.prog-sphere.com/interviews/within-progress-interview/

Thessaloniki, Greece based progressive rock/metal quintet Within Progress was formed in 2017. The band recorded their debut EP ‘Oceans of Time‘ same year, and released it in April 2018. While the group is currently working on songs for their upcoming full-length release, we featured a song from a debut EP on our latest Progotronics compilation, and as a result of that we talked with the band about their work.

Define the mission of Within Progress.

We are five very different people who came together from our love of music. We don’t “do” genres, we gather together to write music we love and want to hear, and we think that it has a potential for something unique, because of how different each one of our personality and mindset is. Our mission is to get that across to as many people as we can.

Tell me about the creative process that informed your debut EP “Oceans of Time” and the themes it captures.

“Oceans of Time” is the collection of the best songs we ever tried to write together as a band. The basis of all songs was written by only two of current members and an ex-guitarist who would get together 1-2 times per week and see what kind of music they could compose together. Since the current line-up was completed very shortly before we started recording, many things were re-written during the sessions. Music always came before lyrics and it’s almost always like that for us as we are more expressive with music than with lyrics. We also didn’t have a singer during the majority of the time that the songs were being written so what you hear on the EP are mainly guitar/riff driven compositions with vocals placed on top as efficiently as we could. It was the first serious songwriting attempt for all us and we think we got a very stellar result.

The themes that “Oceans of Time” captures are mainly based on negative aspects of modern day society, with a slight emphasis on certain human behaviors and patterns, and how those cause hostility and alienation in our relationships. For example, we question the beliefs of parents that are passed on to their children at an age when they haven’t developed their own free will or how sometimes we would rather appear knowledgeable to impress our peers than admitting that we in fact know very little of that certain subject.

What is the message you are trying to give with “Oceans of Time”?

It’s always more controversial when someone speaks about the negative side of things and provokes people and lyrically we wanted to do just that. To make people aware of these situations, acknowledge that they’re there, they’re real and they affect our daily lives, and try to better ourselves and our relationships with each other in spite of them.

Musically, “Oceans of Time” is a kind of “we’re here” statement. We wanted to introduce ourselves to the scene with just a small taste before we set on to release more ambitious things.

How did you document the music while it was being formulated?

We would always write everything on software and orchestrate the songs from the computer first before we played them live in the studio. There’s an upside and a downside in doing this. We chose to work in this manner because of the nature of progressive music. For example, you can’t go in the studio and suddenly jam syncopated riffs in odd time signatures from scratch. You have to actually see everything written down on paper or on screen. So each new idea was first written on sheet music on the computer and we worked our way up from there. Usually the guitar was the driving force of the songs except for the song “Oceans of Time” in which the drums were written first.

The downside of our approach to songwriting is that the music isn’t as spontaneous as it could be if it was written while rehearsing. We try to balance the two approaches when we write music now.

Oceans of Time

Is the dynamic flow of the pieces carefully architected?

The fact that the pieces are carefully architected is a bit of an understatement (haha), and we don’t mean that in a pretentious way. The songs are most definitely not perfect but we’re not the kind of band that writes a song in a few hours and calls it a day. The basic structure of the song could be written in a short amount of time but it takes weeks before we’re happy with the end result. We always ask ourselves “How could this part be better?” or “Is this section really as good as it can be?”. For “Oceans of Time”, many sections were re-arranged and re-written, parts were erased or added, even during the recording sessions, while always serving the song.

Describe the approach to recording the EP.

We recorded the EP in Fireball Music Studio in Thessaloniki. We had already decided which 5 songs we would include in the album. Before recording we listened to the songs with the producer from demos we had made ourselves and some others in MIDI form. He offered some suggestions for the songs themselves and for how we would approach recording.

Drums & percussion were recorded first in 3 days followed by guitars, bass and piano/synths. Because of the two bassists that came before our current one, the bass parts were the ones that suffered the most alterations during the process as they did not fit well with the drums so many things were changed on the spot. Finally vocals came last and took the longest. Our singer actually recorded the entire album in a day but decided to erase the whole thing and redo everything as he wasn’t happy with the result. During recording, at least two band members were present to offer suggestions and help so no one actually recorded alone. Our producer helped us hugely in both the compositional side of things as well as the recording process itself and we took his advice when we thought that it improved the song. That was the case in many different occasions. It was the first official recording session for all of us during which we discovered how different the studio is from a live setting but we also grasped our capabilities as musicians in our own respective instruments.

How long was “Oceans of Time” in the making?

The songs were written in a year although some ideas existed long before. The recording sessions for drums, guitars took place in July 2017 while bass, piano/synths and vocals went on during the autumn of 2017. The album was mixed and mastered by Joe FK by February 2018 and the first song was released in March with the entire album release in April 2018. In general, the entire album was almost a year and a half in the making, from the songwriting to the mastering stage.

Which bands or artists influenced your work on the release?

The songs were being written while the main songwriters of the band were out of their heavy metal phase and into discovering more and more progressive bands. So you can expect the “classic” Tool, Dream Theater, Porcupine Tree influence on the music as well as more modern examples like Tesseract, Leprous, Mastodon & Gojira and also Hans Zimmer on the track “Celestial Notion”. A lot of our guitar work was actually inspired by Greek traditional music where odd time signatures and a lot of “eastern” sounding melodies are commonplace. That theme is actually very upfront on the record and many people have noticed it.

What is your view on technology in music?

We live in an age where you can take basically any sound and manipulate or process it in any way you see fit. With that fact alone, the sky is the limit when it comes to making music which to us is unbelievably fascinating. We’re big fans of using effects or plugins, reversed sounds and processed audio in an unconventional way just to see what sound they make and how that can be used musically. All that is now at your fingertips, at a click of a button and with basic computer knowledge, anyone can try it. Also, thanks to technology anyone can record and produce music even with a very low budget which also means that there is more music being released today than ever before. It really is exhausting to think how much music is out there and so much of it is really good!

There’s absolutely no way that you won’t find something to your liking.
That being said, it is so easy to use technology nowadays to edit your playing and alter your sound into something that you haven’t thought about how you’ll play or recreate live. That to us is a big mistake as you can easily reassure yourself that you’ll fix it in the editing stage or in the mix when you actually haven’t played the part as well as you could. It is fun to use technology to our advantage but let’s not forget that we’re people who play music live.

Within Progress live

Do you see your music as serving a purpose beyond music?

Of course we do. Music is for so much more than just listening. It makes you feel things that no other medium can make you feel. It’s raw and pure emotion and it can be cathartic. When you haven’t had the best day, a small piece of lyric behind beautiful harmony can change that. When you’re happy, a happy song can amplify your feelings. It can simply get you in the right frame of mind when you want to accomplish goals. Music (as well as film) is one of the most powerful ways to deliver a message or story and (cliché aside) it really does bring people together because it is culturally universal, whether it is a 20-minute long progressive metal symphony or a 3 minute pop song.

What are your plans for the future?

We are currently writing songs for our first full-length album and there are a lot of exciting and new ideas! So many that some will have to go to the 2nd album or later releases. It is the first time the entire current line-up is in the same room composing music from scratch together so the result will be quite different from “Oceans of Time”. We’re also thinking about how we will release our LP and so far we have just been brainstorming ideas. When it comes to gigs, we have put that on hold right now as finishing our album is priority number one and we want it to be as good as it possibly can. However we’re always on the lookout for live shows that can get us exposure to more people (so far in Greece).

Thank you for having us and for the very nice questions!

Oceans of Time is available from Bandcamp here. Follow Within Progress on Facebook and Instagram.

The post WITHIN PROGRESS: Different Mindsets appeared first on Prog Sphere.

This news story was originally published here: https://www.prog-sphere.com/interviews/atomic-shadows-interview/

Serbian metal four-piece Atomic Shadows are set to launch their full-length debut album entitled ‘Red’ later this year. The band has recently premiered a first single off of the album for the song “Hiraeth” which was a part of the Progotronics 15 sampler. Singer Dragisa Beric spoke for Prog Sphere.

Define the mission of Atomic Shadows.

Well our mission is to make the music that we enjoy playing and evolve over time, not losing the fun in the process. We hope to do this for a long time and experiment, trying not to be confined by any particular genre, and aim to make every new album different and exciting.

The first single titled “Hiraeth” from your upcoming album was a part of our recent Progotronics compilation. What can you tell me about the upcoming release, and how does “Hiraeth” fit into it?

Yes and we are very happy to be the part of your 15th Progotronics compilation. Our upcoming album will be the part of trilogy, so the next 3 albums are going to be connected with color themes as expression of emotions. So we will take this opportunity to announce the name of the first album, and it will be called “Red”. Red is stimulating and exciting colour and depending of the shades of red it can range from anger, wrath to heat, longing, lust and so on. So Hiraeth is more in a range of lust and longing emotionally.

Tell me about the creative process that informed your upcoming album and the themes it captures.

In the beginning we just started working on new songs, and as we’ve progressed the material started unfolding into a theme, for which the idea for trilogy album came out. Inspiration and work ethic are working well for us, because by just playing the ideas emerge spontaneously.

What is the message you are trying to give with “Hiraeth”?

We’re not really trying to give any particular message with this song. Hiraeth is concepted so that the listener can interpret and connect in his own way with the song, as most of our songs. As we’ve said before, this song is lyrically and musically in a range of lust and longing emotion, like the title of the song says. The word cannot be completely translated, meaning more than just “missing something”.

How did you document the music while it was being formulated?

We record every rehearsal and listen to it later. For us this is the very important step, because it drives new ideas while listening. Also because the lyrics usually come after the music is done, it allows us to feel the emotion of the music, and blend the lyrics theme easier with the music.

Describe the approach to recording the album.

By the time we are ready to enter the studio, we have a general view on how the songs should sound like. However, we always leave some room for creative process to happen in the studio as well. We don’t try to control the things to much, because that’s the right way to let the magic happen. Also our producer Milos Mihajlovic is very helpful in this process by trying to make the most out of each take.

Which bands or artists influenced your work on the release?

Well we can name the bands that influenced us generally, like from Led Zeppelin, The Stooges, Joy Division, to Faith No More, Tool,Porcupine Tree, Deftones, Pantera, Down, Soundgarden, Alice in Chains, The Melvins, Fugazi, Sonic Youth, Prodigy, Black Flag, My Bloody Valentine etc.. However we can’t point out to any specific genre or bands that influenced this release, because it’s a blend of a lot of different influences.

What is your view on technology in music?

When used the right way the technology can be very well utilized . The most important thing is that it doesn’t sound too sterile, it needs to keep the natural sound and capture emotion in the right way.

Do you see your music as serving a purpose beyond music?

Depends on the perception of what could be beyond music. We are acting out all the possible emotions playing as well as listening to music, and it is definitely a big part of our lives.

What are your plans for the future?

Our plans are to release this album in the very near future, the songs are done and we’re just doing mixes right now. To present it in the best way that we can, by doing gigs and releasing more music videos. Also we are already doing some new songs.

The post ATOMIC SHADOWS: Spontaneous Ideas appeared first on Prog Sphere.

This news story was originally published here: http://www.prog-sphere.com/interviews/atomic-shadows-interview/

Serbian metal four-piece Atomic Shadows are set to launch their full-length debut album entitled ‘Red’ later this year. The band has recently premiered a first single off of the album for the song “Hiraeth” which was a part of the Progotronics 15 sampler. Singer Dragisa Beric spoke for Prog Sphere.

Define the mission of Atomic Shadows.

Well our mission is to make the music that we enjoy playing and evolve over time, not losing the fun in the process. We hope to do this for a long time and experiment, trying not to be confined by any particular genre, and aim to make every new album different and exciting.

The first single titled “Hiraeth” from your upcoming album was a part of our recent Progotronics compilation. What can you tell me about the upcoming release, and how does “Hiraeth” fit into it?

Yes and we are very happy to be the part of your 15th Progotronics compilation. Our upcoming album will be the part of trilogy, so the next 3 albums are going to be connected with color themes as expression of emotions. So we will take this opportunity to announce the name of the first album, and it will be called “Red”. Red is stimulating and exciting colour and depending of the shades of red it can range from anger, wrath to heat, longing, lust and so on. So Hiraeth is more in a range of lust and longing emotionally.

Tell me about the creative process that informed your upcoming album and the themes it captures.

In the beginning we just started working on new songs, and as we’ve progressed the material started unfolding into a theme, for which the idea for trilogy album came out. Inspiration and work ethic are working well for us, because by just playing the ideas emerge spontaneously.

What is the message you are trying to give with “Hiraeth”?

We’re not really trying to give any particular message with this song. Hiraeth is concepted so that the listener can interpret and connect in his own way with the song, as most of our songs. As we’ve said before, this song is lyrically and musically in a range of lust and longing emotion, like the title of the song says. The word cannot be completely translated, meaning more than just “missing something”.

How did you document the music while it was being formulated?

We record every rehearsal and listen to it later. For us this is the very important step, because it drives new ideas while listening. Also because the lyrics usually come after the music is done, it allows us to feel the emotion of the music, and blend the lyrics theme easier with the music.

Describe the approach to recording the album.

By the time we are ready to enter the studio, we have a general view on how the songs should sound like. However, we always leave some room for creative process to happen in the studio as well. We don’t try to control the things to much, because that’s the right way to let the magic happen. Also our producer Milos Mihajlovic is very helpful in this process by trying to make the most out of each take.

Which bands or artists influenced your work on the release?

Well we can name the bands that influenced us generally, like from Led Zeppelin, The Stooges, Joy Division, to Faith No More, Tool,Porcupine Tree, Deftones, Pantera, Down, Soundgarden, Alice in Chains, The Melvins, Fugazi, Sonic Youth, Prodigy, Black Flag, My Bloody Valentine etc.. However we can’t point out to any specific genre or bands that influenced this release, because it’s a blend of a lot of different influences.

What is your view on technology in music?

When used the right way the technology can be very well utilized . The most important thing is that it doesn’t sound too sterile, it needs to keep the natural sound and capture emotion in the right way.

Do you see your music as serving a purpose beyond music?

Depends on the perception of what could be beyond music. We are acting out all the possible emotions playing as well as listening to music, and it is definitely a big part of our lives.

What are your plans for the future?

Our plans are to release this album in the very near future, the songs are done and we’re just doing mixes right now. To present it in the best way that we can, by doing gigs and releasing more music videos. Also we are already doing some new songs.

The post ATOMIC SHADOWS: Spontaneous Ideas appeared first on Prog Sphere.

This news story was originally published here: http://theprogressiveaspect.net/blog/2019/10/18/king-gizzard-the-lizard-wizard/

O2 Victoria Warehouse, Manchester
Thursday, 3rd October 2019

Having taken a well-earned rest from releasing anything in 2018, King Gizzard & The Lizard Wizard are back with two shiny new records to show the world.

It’s somewhat of a quieter year compared to the five albums fans were treated to in 2017, but who knows, maybe less can be more? And, with a band infamous for their unique live shows, the true test of these albums comes on the road. As their world tour rolls on, a stop at Manchester’s O2 Victoria Warehouse seemed a perfect setting for an evening of psychedelic rock.

2019’s Infest the Rats’ Nest contains some of the bands most feral material to date, with an unexpected exploration into thrash metal. We’re a long way from the much softer psychedelia they were known for half a decade ago. This might be a bit much for some listeners, but you cannot deny the energy of these tracks live. King Gizzard held nothing back with opening song Self-Immolate leading straight into Perihelion. Both drummers Michael Cavanagh and Eric Moore maintained an intense pace, completely in sync, providing a strong backing for such intense tracks.

King Gizzard & the Lizard Wizard 3

The album Fishing For Fishies, also released this year, feels much more like business as usual for the band. With roots clearly in classic psychedelic rock, it’s an enjoyable listen, if a tad clichéd. Ambrose Kenny-Smith’s harmonica playing was a real treat on the live renditions. Feeling straight out of the seventies, I’d happily welcome this trope back into the modern-day.

Plastic Boogie proved to be the strongest live offering from this album. The riffs stay true to the track’s “boogie” namesake, getting the crowd moving, though this very much seems ironic when compared to the song’s lyrics, centred on the damage plastic causes to the environment. Although their point may be too on the nose with lines, “Fuck all of that plastic” and “The way we wrap it is wrong”, they remain memorable. And, considering how often people ignore these issues, the message may need to be stated that obviously.

The thematically similar track Planet B was even more blatant. The theme is where the similarity ends, however. The four minutes of shredding and screaming sums up about how anxious I am about the current climate crisis. Again, simply put across, the lyric “There is no planet B” effectively conveys their point.

King Gizzard & the Lizard Wizard 4

Leading into another track from Infest The Rats’ Nest, Hell maintained that ferocity. At this point, the crowd were whipped up into a frenzy, the perfect time to deliver material from Nonagon Infinity. The 2016 noise rock album might even be their strongest, which is quite the title among fourteen records. The pairing of Wah Wah flowing seamlessly into Road Train certainly stood out as a highlight in the set.

Ten-minute track The River felt like an odd follow-on. One of four parts from Quarters, it had the feel of a psychedelic jam session, even jazzy at times. Definitely not without merit, but a deflating end to the set. The previous four tracks built up so much energy to a climax that never arrived. Not even an encore. The feeling amongst the audience was just confusion… not the impression you want to leave. With scores of fans chanting for Rattlesnake, the band could have ended on a high by indulging them in any one of their classics.

An overall strong performance from King Gizzard, but at this point, more can be expected of them. Fundamentally, the show was flawed by older stronger material making way for their latest albums. Definitely not weak tracks, but not up to scratch with the burst of creativity they had in 2017. However, King Gizzard & The Lizard Wizard simply do whatever the hell they want. This is the attitude that led to their variety of music and ultimately their success. They are always going to be a band worth seeing.

King Gizzard & the Lizard Wizard 5

[All photos by Leo Trimming.]

SETLIST
Self-Immolate
Perihelion
Plastic Boogie
The Great Chain of Being
This Thing
Down the Sink
Let me Mend the Past
Cut-Throat Boogie
The Cruel Millenial
Alter Me III
Altered Beast IV
Cyboogie
Inner Cell
Loyalty
Horology
Planet B
Hell
Wah Wah
Road Train
The River

MUSICIANS
Stu Mackenzie – Vocals, Guitar, Bass, Keyboards, Flute
Ambrose Kenny-Smith – Vocals, Harmonica, Keyboards
Cook Craig – Guitar, Bass, Vocals
Joey Walker – Guitar, Bass, Keyboards, Vocals
Lucas Skinner – Bass, Keyboards
Michael Cavanagh – Drums, Percussion
Eric Moore – Drums, Percussion

LINKS
King Gizzard & The Lizard Wizard – Website | Facebook | Bandcamp | Twitter

This news story was originally published here: http://theprogressiveaspect.net/blog/2019/10/17/progdreams-viii-day-3/

De Boerderij, Zoetermeer, NL
Sunday, 22nd September 2019

It’s safe to say that De Boerderij in Zoetermeer is the number one prog stage in the Netherlands. The theatre has already been voted runner up several times in the favourite prog venues poll by PROG magazine, just behind the Royal Albert Hall. To illustrate this, the Progdreams festival was organized for the eighth time in succession this year. Once again, the poster was littered with interesting names such as Sky Architect, The Paradox Twin and Von Hertzen Brothers on Friday and The Dame, IT, Verbal Delirium, IO Earth and Gazpacho on Saturday. Unfortunately, due to circumstances, I was unable to attend the entire event, but Sunday did fit in with my personal program, and I was certainly not disappointed by what was on offer on this final day.


Franck Carducci

Franck Carducci & Mary ReynaudThe Franck Carducci band guarantees a spectacular, theatrical show, and the knowledgeable prog fan knows what to expect. Despite the fact that the band has to play at a difficult time, as first of four bands on a Sunday afternoon around 3pm, the atmosphere is excellent right from the start. The band treats us to more than an hour of steaming prog rock, accompanied by a brilliant theatre show. Opener Slave to Rock ‘n’ Roll goes down really well with the audience, Carducci steals the show, as usual, together with Mary Reynaud. The latter plays a special role and fits in perfectly with her feather-light appearance. The fans watch and listen breathlessly as she, dressed in her angel costume, moves gracefully across the stage.

Franck CarducciThe medley should not be missed, kicking off with The Quind, the rest is one big feast for both eyes and ears. Not for the first time, a fully acoustic version of On the Road to Nowhere is performed, Franck on 12-string guitar, singing without a microphone, supported by the rest of the band, an absolute highlight. Alice’s Eerie Dream is Carducci’s version of Alice in Wonderland, with high theatrical content. As an encore, the band plays the well-known Artificial Paradise which blends seamlessly into a cover of Pink Floyd’s Eclipse. The sparkling show by these men plus lady is highly appreciated by the enthusiastic audience, as evidenced by the ecstatic applause, gratefully accepted by the group. Together with his band, Carducci will remain present all day, manning his merchandising booth himself, a particularly sympathetic and creative guy. It is about time for a break-through to larger audiences.

SET LIST
Slave To Rock ‘n’ Roll
The After Effect
Achilles
The Angel
The Quind / Journey Through The Mind / A Letter Tale Of Time / The Last Oddity
On The Road To Nowhere
Déjà Vu Airport
Alice’s Eerie Dream
~ Encore:
Artificial Paradises
Eclipse (Pink Floyd cover)
MUSICIANS
Christophe Obadia – Electric Guitar, Didgeridoo, Bass Pedals
Olivier Castan – Keyboards
Mary Reynaud – Theremin, Rainstick, Tambourine, Vocals
Nino Reina – Drums, Background Vocals
Franck Carducci – Bass Guitar, 12-String Guitar, Vocals

LINKS
Franck Carducci – Website | Facebook | Bandcamp


Brian Cummins plays Peter Gabriel

Brian CumminsBrian Cummins is best known as frontman/singer of tribute bands such as Carpet Crawlers and The ELO Show. Occasionally he makes a sidestep towards other prog artists, in his repertoire there is also a Peter Gabriel show which he performs as a solo artist. With this particular act he performed during Progdreams, and I’ll get straight to the point: it was a mediocre to weak performance by the sympathetic Englishman. Whether it was the fact that he had poorly prepared himself or that it was technically all too difficult, I really don’t know. The fact is that this was certainly not the best show that Brian Cummins has delivered at De Boerderij. In addition, the same old joke about PG’s Greatest Hits/Best Of and the fake conversation with non-present band members came across as somewhat pitiful. Having said that, he still has a good singing voice that comes close to the special sound of the original from time to time, especially during the acoustic pieces, such as Here Comes the Flood, the latter was clearly audible. Unfortunately for Cummins, the already not well-attended room was rendered half-empty over the course of his act. The crowd obviously preferred a snack or dinner to the show. Too bad, the Brit always puts a lot of effort into his performance with a high work ethic, but sadly he is failing somewhat in his Ed Sheeran act, with many effects and electronic gadgets. Shortening his usual set, and, in that context, the choice of repertoire did not really help either. Better luck next time.

SET LIST
Here Comes the Flood
Red Rain
Intruder
Talk To Me
Snapshot
Carpet Crawl
Mercy Street
San Jacinto
Biko
MUSICIANS
Brian Cummins – Guitars, Vocals, Sound Effects

LINKS
Brian Cummins – Facebook


John Hackett Band

Nick Fletcher - John Hackett BandPersonally, I had been looking forward to this performance of the John Hackett band. More specifically, the release of his latest album, Beyond The Stars from 2018 and his most proggy to date, sparked my interest. John Hackett, best known for his work with older brother Steve, kicks off at around 7pm for a performance that would last more than one and a half hours. Only about 100 people were present this Sunday, the closing day of the festival, a very modest number, which immediately raises the question whether this is sufficient for a follow-up event, but that question has been asked many times before and one way or another director Arie Verstegen and his staff always manage to present an interesting program to us, for which he deserves praise. However, some things have to be mentioned about the performance of the band. The harmony vocals were extremely mediocre and sometimes even out of tune. Hackett’s voice is unobtrusive and flat, neither fish nor fowl. The band is by no means a well-oiled machine yet, here and there the sound is still rattling. In their defence, it should be noted that the quartet rare performs live.

John HackettOn the other hand, there’s the performance of an absolute top guitarist named . Certainly not a youngster, on the contrary, but a relative ‘rookie’ when it comes to rock music. In recent decades Fletcher has mainly focused on the classical guitar, nevertheless, he was the star of the show with his play on the electric guitar, which is a cross between the late Allan Holdsworth, Dave Gilmour and Steve Hackett himself. In particular, the songs from the aforementioned most recent album did well. The beautiful King Crimson song I Talk To The Wind also met with lots of appreciation from the crowd. The encore Red Hair, an instrumental referring to the music of Jethro Tull, and the prog/jazz of Wind of Change were the highlights of the show. Oh yes, I almost forget the Peter Gabriel-like (Supper’s Ready!) introduction by drummer Duncan Parsons for the also instrumental Queenie and Elmo’s Perfect Day, hilarious. Could it be a coincidence that especially the instrumental songs came across best?

SET LIST
Spyglass
Whispers
Life In Reverse
Too Easy
Take Control
Burns Down Trees
Queenie And Elmo’s Perfect Day
Sign Of The times
Bamboo Flute
Wind Of Change
Who Let The Rain In
A Time In Place
I talk To The Wind (King Crimson cover)
Drone
A Horse Named Cadillac
~ Encore:
Magazine
Red Hair
MUSICIANS
John Hackett – Keyboards, Flute, Vocals
Jeremy Richardson – Bass, Vocals
Nick Fletcher – Guitar
Duncan Parsons – Drums, Background Vocals

LINKS
John Hackett Band – Website | Facebook


The Watch

Once upon a time, I was allowed to introduce this band on stage, somewhere in 2016 – my debut as a presenter. The Italians tour Europe extensively and visit De Boerderij almost every year, a ‘second home’ as Simone Rossetti mentioned during the performance. This time not a Genesis show, but mostly their own work with some well-chosen songs from their idols. Fortunately, because The Watch is much more than just another cover band, their own authentic material is just too good for that. Just listen to their most recent album Seven and you will be amazed by the musicality and craftsmanship of these musicians. A long soundcheck was needed, even with singer Rossetti overseeing proceedings from the middle of the hall, before the guys thought the sound was good enough to start. They finally did so around 9:20pm.

The Watch

I would like to highlight a few small gems from the setlist, such as opening track Hills/Damage Mode where the merger between Genesis and The Watch is most powerfully represented. And what about the authentic The Fisherman, which blends seamlessly into Apocalypse in 9/8 from Supper’s Ready (Gods of Magog), sublime. Rossetti’s traditional speech in Dutch is received with great applause. In addition, a special mention for the encore with own song New Normal and Genesis cover Firth of Fifth, John Hackett joins on flute on both songs.

The Watch

The show ends around 11 p.m. We have witnessed a great show from the Italians, as always passionate, focused and intense. The sound was excellent, the beautiful light show once again underlines the capabilities of the staff at De Boerderij in this field. An enthusiastic audience, now grown to around 150, could appreciate the combination of largely the band’s own authentic songs and work from the extensive oeuvre of legendary Genesis. It worked for me, another box ticked.

The Watch

A great finale to the eighth edition of the famous Progdreams Festival. Despite a relatively low turnout, once again a great success. Hopefully there are sufficient starting points for organizing a follow-up. The festival has now become a phenomenon and is an essential part of the (prog) concert listing. Let’s hope the management at De Boerderij feels the same way, at least they deserve tribute for their excellent initiative, on to the ninth edition!

SET LIST
Hills
Damage Mode
Goddess
Shining Bald Heads
Devil’s Bridge
Soaring On
Stagnation (Genesis cover)
DNAlien
The Fisherman
Supper’s Ready (Apocalypse in 9/8) (Genesis cover)
The Lamia (Genesis cover)
Deeper Still
Blackest Deeds
~ Encore
New Normal (with John Hackett)
Firth of Fifth (with John Hackett)
MUSICIANS
JSimone Rossetti – Vocals, Flute
Marco Fabbri – Drums, Percussion
Giorgio Gabriel – Acoustic & Electric Guitar
Valerio De Vittorio – Keyboards, Acoustic guitar, Vocals
Mattia Rossetti – Bass Guitar, 12-String Electric Guitar, Vocals
Special guest:
John Hackett – Flute

LINKS
The Watch – Website | Facebook


Photos by Ron Kraaijkamp (Cultuurpodium Boerderij)


Progdreams Festival – Facebook

Edition 214 of Sounds That Can Be Made is now available as a podcast!

Playlist:

Stevie Wonder – Happy Birthday (from Hotter Than July)
Big Big Train – Judas Unrepentant (from English Electric Part One)
The Beatles – Strawberry Fields Forever (from Strawberry Fields Forever/Penny Lane)
Yes – Awaken (from Going For The One)
Genesis – Blood On The Rooftops (from Wind & Wuthering)
Peter Gabriel – Not One Of Us (from Peter Gabriel)
Supertramp – Fool’s Overture (from Even In The Quietest Moments)
The Moody Blues – Have You Heard (Pt. 1)/The Voyage/Have You Heard (Pt. 2) (from On The Threshold Of A Dream)
Man – Many Are Called, But Few Get Up (from Do You Like It Here Now… Are You Settling In?)
Emerson, Lake & Palmer – Memoirs of an Officer and a Gentleman: i. Prologue / The Education of a Gentleman, ii. Love At First Sight, iii. Letters from the Front, iv. Honourable Company (A March) (from Love Beach)
Eureka – In Search Of Relief (from Shackleton’s Voyage)
Unitopia – When I’m Down (from The Garden)
Alan Parsons Project – The Raven (from Tales of Mystery and Imagination (Edgar Allan Poe))
Steve Hackett – Shadow of the Hierophant (from Voyage Of The Acolyte)
Led Zeppelin – When The Levee Breaks (from Led Zeppelin IV)
Roy Harper – The Same Old Rock (from Stormcock)
The Carpenters – Goodbye To Love (from A Song For You)

#progzillaradio #stcbm #pruneparty

Proving that prog isn't just for dinosaurs!

I’m delighted to announce that the podcast for edition 311 of Live From Progzilla Towers is now available.

In this edition we heard the following music:

  • Led Zeppelin – Carouselambra
  • Anubis – A Tower Of Silence
  • Frames – Intro/The Beginning
  • Banco Del Mutuo Soccorso – Stelle Sulla Terra
  • Japan – Methods Of Dance
  • Pendragon – The Voyager
  • Hawkestrel – Do What Ya Need To Do
  • Peter Gabriel – Quiet Steam
  • Peter Gabriel – Biko (Remix)
  • Peter Gabriel – Sledgehammer (Dance Mix)
  • Eyevory – Follow Me
  • Porcupine Tree – Last Chance To Evacuate Planet Earth Before It Is Recycled
  • Frank Zappa – Black Napkins
  • Peter Hammill – A Louse Is Not A Home
  • Popol Vuh – Aguirre I (L Acrime Di Rei)
  • The Opium Cartel – Silence Instead
  • Karmakanic – Undertow/When The World Is Caving In

iTunes/iPod users*: Just search for ‘Progzilla’ or subscribe to: http://www.progzilla.com/media/podcasts/podcast.xml

Enjoy!

This week on Prog-Watch there’s more great new prog rock from How Far To Hitchin’, Klone, Steve Hackett and the Genesis Revisited Band and Orchestra, the Earthling Society, and Richard Henshall (of Haken)! Also, some classic music from Joe Walsh, and Port Noir on Progressive Discoveries with Dr. Rob Fisher!

642: Variety + Port Noir on Progressive Discoveries

 

Edition 207 of Steve Blease’s Heavy Elements is now available as a podcast.

Playlist:

Star One – Earth That Was
Alarion – Chains of the Collective
Unwritten Pages – In the Name of Ishmael
Ayreon – Into the Black Hole

Epic at 11: Headspace – The Science Within Us

Archangel – Misplaced Love
Acid Empire – Into the Void

Album of the Week: Threshold – Wounded Land

Paradox
Intervention
Sanity’s End

Maiden uniteD – Where Eagles Dare

#progzillaradio #heavyelements