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All posts for the month July, 2019

This news story was originally published here: https://www.prog-sphere.com/interviews/emanuele-bodo-interview/

Italy has been kicking some major arse as of lately with the amount of great emerging prog artists. Emanuele Bodo is yet another of great Italian guitarists and composers who released his debut album ‘Unsafe Places‘ back in March. The instrumental, seven-song release is filled to the brim with excellent arrangements and interplay between Bodo and rest of the band.

In an interview for Prog Sphere, Bodo speaks about the project, working on the album, and more.

Define the mission of your project.

The mission of this work is to create new music with unique and personal characteristics that best represent my moods and my creative vein. Then there is obviously the desire to be known in the wide progressive panorama that is having an interesting flowering in the recent years.

Tell me about the creative process that informed your debut album “Unsafe Places.”

I started composing the songs of ‘Unsafe Places’ about four years ago starting from some ideas I had developed over the years. Initially not thought that it would become such a long and ambitious job; but along the way I started dedicating more and more time to composing the songs and, as the results seemed interesting to me, I started to propose the drafts ideas to the other musicians who then recorded the album.

Although “Unsafe Places” is an instrumental release, is there a certain message you are trying to give with it?

Of course, my vision of instrumental music is full of messages and content. We can imagine the tracks that make up “Unsafe Places” like seven journeys in real and imaginary places, where we immerse ourselves in dark environments, rich in mystery, sometimes dramatic or romantic. The global message is that, through music and more generally, through art, we can make journeys towards what most attracts us in that specific moment.

Emanuele Bodo - Unsafe Places

How did you document the music while it was being formulated?

I normally compose my music via computer and in this case I meticulously wrote the parts of all the instruments, even though I knew that they would then be re-interpreted by the musicians during the recordings. Even the guitar parts, being often very articulate, I wrote them on the computer before recording them. Then I relied a lot on memorizing playing, already in the composition phase, the parts in order to make them as fluid and smooth as possible, despite the continuous rhythmic plots. In rare cases I have recorded some ideas on the fly that I developed later.

Is the dynamic flow of the pieces carefully architected?

Yes, absolutely. it was a very meticulous work because each track tells a particular real or imaginary story, so the music follows these events step by step.
To give a very significant example I will briefly talk about the last track of the album: “Chernobyl”. To compose this piece I have documented myself on the dramatic story for a long time. Then I retraced the sequence of events that led to the dramatic end we all know. Listening to the song, you can perceive all the moods and atmospheres before and immediately after the catastrophe.

Describe the approach to recording the album.

I took care of all the pre-production of the album in my personal studio and after that, we recorded all the drum tracks in the Æ nima recordings studios by Mattia Garimanno who did an exceptional job both from the point of view of the execution and the recordings.

Once the drums were finished, I recorded all the rhythm guitars and then it was the time for Carlo Ferri on bass and in the meantime I added almost all the guitar solo parts. The final part of the recordings fell to Davide Cristofoli, who gave a really remarkable touch both in terms of orchestrations and in the choice of synth sounds.

Finally we completed the work with the sound effects and the environment noise that are an important part of the songs.

Apart from the ‘vst’ used for the sounds of keyboards and orchestra, I want to say that all the other instruments were recorded in the old fashioned way, therefore with real amplifiers and acoustic drums. Thanks to this aspect I find that the result is less cold and with a beautiful natural and homogeneous sound.

How long “Unsafe Places” was in the making?

As for the compositional part it was quite long… About four years! Instead the recording process was quite smooth, and lasted about a week for each instrument and about two months for the guitars (yes, I am very demanding with myself in the studio and prefer to redo hundreds of times rather than edit later!). this is thanks to the fact that I have painstakingly taken care of the pre-production, making sure that all the compositions functioned properly before starting the final registrations.

Which bands or artists influenced your work on the release?

In naming some of my influences, I would start with Dream Theater, probably my biggest source of inspiration but also Planet X and Angra, some more extreme bands like Meshuggah and Opeth, then the virtuosos of the six-string of eighties and nineties including Steve Vai, Yngwie Malmsteen, Jason Becker, Marty Friedman and Mattias Eklundh in rock and metal genre; while in the more jazz-fusion area I can mention Bireli Lagrene, Frank Gambale, Greg Howe, Guthrie Govan and the incomparable Allan Holdsworth… Finally the artists of recent years like Intervals, Plini and Periphery.

What is your view on technology in music?

Absolutely in a positive way, I always try to stay up to date on technological developments that can greatly benefit music. I think we should always try to keep up with the times and know how to benefit from the technological innovations we have available. This does not mean accepting everything that is modern and technological with eyes closed. I give an example: if I can use a very innovative and performing guitars compared to others, perhaps more historical but obviously obsolete, from the technological point of view why not do it?

Do you see your music as serving a purpose beyond music?

Well, I think that for those who composes his music it’s always something that goes further the simple song. In my case, every track is inextricably linked to particular moments of life or states of mind that inevitably resurface when I listen or talk about them. The aim I would say is that it goes beyond music and is to make the listener, at least for an hour, free to travel in particular and unusual settings taking only some inspiration from the music itself and letting oneself be transported by something wider and more global.

What are your plans for the future?

I’m working with the other band members on Errant Shadow’s second album, which will see me busy for the next few months. Then I’d like to start bringing my album live from the autumn and finally I plan to use some extracts from ‘Unsafe Places’ to create educational material that can be stimulating for creativity as I deal with music education every day.

I’d also like to do a second edition of the album, maybe with a bonus track and some special guests, but the time available is always limited unfortunately…

Unsafe Places is out now and is available from Bandcamp.

The post EMANUELE BODO: Unique Characteristics appeared first on Prog Sphere.

This news story was originally published here: http://www.prog-sphere.com/interviews/emanuele-bodo-interview/

Italy has been kicking some major arse as of lately with the amount of great emerging prog artists. Emanuele Bodo is yet another of great Italian guitarists and composers who released his debut album ‘Unsafe Places‘ back in March. The instrumental, seven-song release is filled to the brim with excellent arrangements and interplay between Bodo and rest of the band.

In an interview for Prog Sphere, Bodo speaks about the project, working on the album, and more.

Define the mission of your project.

The mission of this work is to create new music with unique and personal characteristics that best represent my moods and my creative vein. Then there is obviously the desire to be known in the wide progressive panorama that is having an interesting flowering in the recent years.

Tell me about the creative process that informed your debut album “Unsafe Places.”

I started composing the songs of ‘Unsafe Places’ about four years ago starting from some ideas I had developed over the years. Initially not thought that it would become such a long and ambitious job; but along the way I started dedicating more and more time to composing the songs and, as the results seemed interesting to me, I started to propose the drafts ideas to the other musicians who then recorded the album.

Although “Unsafe Places” is an instrumental release, is there a certain message you are trying to give with it?

Of course, my vision of instrumental music is full of messages and content. We can imagine the tracks that make up “Unsafe Places” like seven journeys in real and imaginary places, where we immerse ourselves in dark environments, rich in mystery, sometimes dramatic or romantic. The global message is that, through music and more generally, through art, we can make journeys towards what most attracts us in that specific moment.

Emanuele Bodo - Unsafe Places

How did you document the music while it was being formulated?

I normally compose my music via computer and in this case I meticulously wrote the parts of all the instruments, even though I knew that they would then be re-interpreted by the musicians during the recordings. Even the guitar parts, being often very articulate, I wrote them on the computer before recording them. Then I relied a lot on memorizing playing, already in the composition phase, the parts in order to make them as fluid and smooth as possible, despite the continuous rhythmic plots. In rare cases I have recorded some ideas on the fly that I developed later.

Is the dynamic flow of the pieces carefully architected?

Yes, absolutely. it was a very meticulous work because each track tells a particular real or imaginary story, so the music follows these events step by step.
To give a very significant example I will briefly talk about the last track of the album: “Chernobyl”. To compose this piece I have documented myself on the dramatic story for a long time. Then I retraced the sequence of events that led to the dramatic end we all know. Listening to the song, you can perceive all the moods and atmospheres before and immediately after the catastrophe.

Describe the approach to recording the album.

I took care of all the pre-production of the album in my personal studio and after that, we recorded all the drum tracks in the Æ nima recordings studios by Mattia Garimanno who did an exceptional job both from the point of view of the execution and the recordings.

Once the drums were finished, I recorded all the rhythm guitars and then it was the time for Carlo Ferri on bass and in the meantime I added almost all the guitar solo parts. The final part of the recordings fell to Davide Cristofoli, who gave a really remarkable touch both in terms of orchestrations and in the choice of synth sounds.

Finally we completed the work with the sound effects and the environment noise that are an important part of the songs.

Apart from the ‘vst’ used for the sounds of keyboards and orchestra, I want to say that all the other instruments were recorded in the old fashioned way, therefore with real amplifiers and acoustic drums. Thanks to this aspect I find that the result is less cold and with a beautiful natural and homogeneous sound.

How long “Unsafe Places” was in the making?

As for the compositional part it was quite long… About four years! Instead the recording process was quite smooth, and lasted about a week for each instrument and about two months for the guitars (yes, I am very demanding with myself in the studio and prefer to redo hundreds of times rather than edit later!). this is thanks to the fact that I have painstakingly taken care of the pre-production, making sure that all the compositions functioned properly before starting the final registrations.

Which bands or artists influenced your work on the release?

In naming some of my influences, I would start with Dream Theater, probably my biggest source of inspiration but also Planet X and Angra, some more extreme bands like Meshuggah and Opeth, then the virtuosos of the six-string of eighties and nineties including Steve Vai, Yngwie Malmsteen, Jason Becker, Marty Friedman and Mattias Eklundh in rock and metal genre; while in the more jazz-fusion area I can mention Bireli Lagrene, Frank Gambale, Greg Howe, Guthrie Govan and the incomparable Allan Holdsworth… Finally the artists of recent years like Intervals, Plini and Periphery.

What is your view on technology in music?

Absolutely in a positive way, I always try to stay up to date on technological developments that can greatly benefit music. I think we should always try to keep up with the times and know how to benefit from the technological innovations we have available. This does not mean accepting everything that is modern and technological with eyes closed. I give an example: if I can use a very innovative and performing guitars compared to others, perhaps more historical but obviously obsolete, from the technological point of view why not do it?

Do you see your music as serving a purpose beyond music?

Well, I think that for those who composes his music it’s always something that goes further the simple song. In my case, every track is inextricably linked to particular moments of life or states of mind that inevitably resurface when I listen or talk about them. The aim I would say is that it goes beyond music and is to make the listener, at least for an hour, free to travel in particular and unusual settings taking only some inspiration from the music itself and letting oneself be transported by something wider and more global.

What are your plans for the future?

I’m working with the other band members on Errant Shadow’s second album, which will see me busy for the next few months. Then I’d like to start bringing my album live from the autumn and finally I plan to use some extracts from ‘Unsafe Places’ to create educational material that can be stimulating for creativity as I deal with music education every day.

I’d also like to do a second edition of the album, maybe with a bonus track and some special guests, but the time available is always limited unfortunately…

Unsafe Places is out now and is available from Bandcamp.

The post EMANUELE BODO: Unique Characteristics appeared first on Prog Sphere.

I’m delighted to announce that the podcast for edition 299 of Live From Progzilla Towers is now available.

In this special edition we celebrate the 50th anniversary of man reaching the moon and heard the following music:

  • Genesis – Watcher Of The Skies
  • Big Big Train – Perfect Cosmic Storm
  • Ayreon – Into The Black Hole
  • Rush – Cygnus X-1 (Book One – The Voyage)
  • Alan Parsons – Apollo (Progzilla Remix)
  • Cosmograf – When The Air Runs Out
  • Eloy – The Light From Deep Darkness
  • Camel – Lunar Sea
  • Ozric Tentacles – Jurassic Shift
  • Hidria Spacefolk – Pangaia
  • Quantum Fantay – Journey From Earth
  • Pink Floyd – Astronomy Domine
  • Public Service Broadcasting – Go
  • Hawkwind – Space Is Deep
  • Van Der Graaf Generator – Pioneers Over C
  • Vespero – Aurora Borealis
  • Rocket Scientists – Space 1999
  • Sound Of Contact – Pale Blue Dot
  • David Bowie – Space Oddity

iTunes/iPod users*: Just search for ‘Progzilla’ or subscribe to: http://www.progzilla.com/media/podcasts/podcast.xml

Enjoy!

This news story was originally published here: https://www.prog-sphere.com/interviews/body-stacker-interview/

Denver, CO thrash metal unit Body Stacker has just come up with their new album, a nine-tracker heavyweight champion entitled ‘Drinking Songs for the End of the World.’ Drummer Brian Townsand speaks about the new album in an interview for Prog Sphere.

Define the mission of Body Stacker.

The mission of Body Stacker has always been to create the most intense, interesting and heavy music we could possibly make and spread it worldwide.

What is the message you are trying to give with “Drinking Songs for the End of the World”?

To have fun. When you listen to a Body Stacker album or see us live we want you to let go of the everyday bullshit and just have fun.

Tell me about the creative process that informed your new album “Drinking Songs for the End of the World” and the themes it captures.

Most of our song writing happens outside of the rehearsal room, inspiration doesn’t always hit in the Jam room, sometimes it happens when you’re driving down the road and a killer riff, drum fill or lyric just comes to you. Or you have an intense or emotional experience that conjures music deep from within. This album captures themes of ancient lore, battle and hidden evil…and of course a lot of bodies being stacked really high.

How did you document the music while it was being formulated?

Mostly on a cell phone haha! We send drum parts, guitar riffs and lyrics back and forth via email or private youtube videos to study between rehearsal sessions. We will also individually refine what lyrics or music we have that way we can present something solid to the other guys when we get back into the rehearsal room. The songs slowly build over weeks or sometimes months. Every once in awhile we can rip out a song in a few sessions.

Drinking Songs for the End of the World

Is the dynamic flow of the pieces carefully architected?

Yes they definitely are, some songs took months just to get the guitar parts right before any drums were even put to them. I construct my drum Parts very carefully and they always change as the song develops, especially once lyrics/vocals are added. Lyrics/vocals typically go last after we get a feel for the atmosphere that song.

Describe the approach to recording the album.

So in the past we just recorded our other demos and EP shortly after writing and rehearsing in the jam room, and later on down the line there was things we wish we would have changed or done differently. With this album we took more time and rehearsed the songs thoroughly, we even played them live at a number of shows. We didn’t hit the studio until all the members were 100% happy with their parts. In the studio we did a live take of guitar and drums. Bass, vocals and guitar solos were recorded later.

How long “Drinking Songs for the End of the World” was in the making?

This album was 2 years in the making.

Which bands or artists influenced your work on the rele

Suicidal Tendencies, Gwar, Slayer, Gojira, Dying Fetus , Mastodon, Iron Maiden, Exodus ghoul just to name a few! We listen to anything and everything that’s heavy.

What is your view on technology in music?

I think its great. All the technological advancements push the envelope of what can be done in music and recording.

Do you see your music as serving a purpose beyond music?

We have a lot of sci-fi and fantasy based lyrics, so I hope it influences our listeners to just have fun, be positive and escape any negative reality when they have our record on.

What are your plans for the future?

Continue to tour like we have been and eventually get to Europe and beyond. Make some more music videos and stack the bodies of our fans nice and high after we blow them away with our blistering thrash attack!

Follow Body Stacker on Facebook.

The post BODY STACKER: Having Fun appeared first on Prog Sphere.

This news story was originally published here: http://www.prog-sphere.com/interviews/body-stacker-interview/

Denver, CO thrash metal unit Body Stacker has just come up with their new album, a nine-tracker heavyweight champion entitled ‘Drinking Songs for the End of the World.’ Drummer Brian Townsand speaks about the new album in an interview for Prog Sphere.

Define the mission of Body Stacker.

The mission of Body Stacker has always been to create the most intense, interesting and heavy music we could possibly make and spread it worldwide.

What is the message you are trying to give with “Drinking Songs for the End of the World”?

To have fun. When you listen to a Body Stacker album or see us live we want you to let go of the everyday bullshit and just have fun.

Tell me about the creative process that informed your new album “Drinking Songs for the End of the World” and the themes it captures.

Most of our song writing happens outside of the rehearsal room, inspiration doesn’t always hit in the Jam room, sometimes it happens when you’re driving down the road and a killer riff, drum fill or lyric just comes to you. Or you have an intense or emotional experience that conjures music deep from within. This album captures themes of ancient lore, battle and hidden evil…and of course a lot of bodies being stacked really high.

How did you document the music while it was being formulated?

Mostly on a cell phone haha! We send drum parts, guitar riffs and lyrics back and forth via email or private youtube videos to study between rehearsal sessions. We will also individually refine what lyrics or music we have that way we can present something solid to the other guys when we get back into the rehearsal room. The songs slowly build over weeks or sometimes months. Every once in awhile we can rip out a song in a few sessions.

Drinking Songs for the End of the World

Is the dynamic flow of the pieces carefully architected?

Yes they definitely are, some songs took months just to get the guitar parts right before any drums were even put to them. I construct my drum Parts very carefully and they always change as the song develops, especially once lyrics/vocals are added. Lyrics/vocals typically go last after we get a feel for the atmosphere that song.

Describe the approach to recording the album.

So in the past we just recorded our other demos and EP shortly after writing and rehearsing in the jam room, and later on down the line there was things we wish we would have changed or done differently. With this album we took more time and rehearsed the songs thoroughly, we even played them live at a number of shows. We didn’t hit the studio until all the members were 100% happy with their parts. In the studio we did a live take of guitar and drums. Bass, vocals and guitar solos were recorded later.

How long “Drinking Songs for the End of the World” was in the making?

This album was 2 years in the making.

Which bands or artists influenced your work on the rele

Suicidal Tendencies, Gwar, Slayer, Gojira, Dying Fetus , Mastodon, Iron Maiden, Exodus ghoul just to name a few! We listen to anything and everything that’s heavy.

What is your view on technology in music?

I think its great. All the technological advancements push the envelope of what can be done in music and recording.

Do you see your music as serving a purpose beyond music?

We have a lot of sci-fi and fantasy based lyrics, so I hope it influences our listeners to just have fun, be positive and escape any negative reality when they have our record on.

What are your plans for the future?

Continue to tour like we have been and eventually get to Europe and beyond. Make some more music videos and stack the bodies of our fans nice and high after we blow them away with our blistering thrash attack!

Follow Body Stacker on Facebook.

The post BODY STACKER: Having Fun appeared first on Prog Sphere.

This news story was originally published here: http://www.prog-sphere.com/interviews/scythian-fate-interview/

Sydney, Australia-based heavy metal trio Scythian Fate started their journey in 2012, and since then the band launched an EP ‘Drakaena Scythia‘ (2016), and earlier this year they have come up with a full-length debut titled ‘Matrimony in Madness.’ Guitarists Tom Kotsonis and Nino Morano, and singer Toby Heal spoke for Prog Sphere about their work.

Define the mission of Scythian Fate?

Tom: To play great kick arse metal that appeals across the genres and create our own unique signature sound. Whilst raised on a diet of classic, power, thrash, death and prog metal; we endeavour to avoid cliches and forge our own path. We want metal heads to listen and say “Fuck yeah that’s Fate”.

Tell me about the creative process that informed your debut album “Matrimony in Madness” and the themes it captures.

Tom: Scythian Fate is a very collaborative metal band. Nino and I worked very closely on the musical and thematic aspects of the album. When we started working on “Matrimony” we were looking for a vocalist. Once we recruited Toby, he introduced his aggressive vocal  style that helped shape the final product.

The album opens with Crimson Snow which depicts Napoleon’s defeat in Russia and transitions into balkan ghosts; a tune which explores the political history and ethnic complexities of the balkans. From there it covers multitude of different themes, ranging from philosophical, religious bigotry, hypocrisy, media shock jocks and injustices in society.

What is the message you are trying to give with “Matrimony in Madness”?  

Tom: The album’s defining message is a  mosaic of the lunacy that surrounds us! We are all married to this madness that comprises society. The epic cover art by Ed Sleiman captures the essence of this theme. The Multi faceted images are entwined with subliminal messages, manifesting into the primordial beast as the centerpiece of the artwork. Ed’s masterpiece on canvass, portrays our lyrical and musical themes. There is an overarching architect behind this smokescreen of insanity.

Scythian Fate - Matrimony in Darkness

How did you document the music while it was being formulated?

Tom: I cannot read music and tend to play by ear. When I create riffs l piece them together in various sequences with a specific theme in mind. The riffs live in my head for several weeks/months. Nino’s creative process is somewhat different to mine, where creates many riffs over the years and eventually finds a home for them. When we get together, we play our riffs to each other and assess their suitability. We then record a rough skeleton of the prospective song and keep it on digital files. It Also helps to video our riffs to help remember the fingerings on the fretboard. We then review it over the months and fine tune. Our approach is highly collaborative and we exchange and swap riffs to eventually mould the finished piece. Now with Toby onboard we will introduce him early on in the process and get his input as well.

Is the dynamic flow of the pieces carefully architected? 

Tom: Absolutely! We spend an eternity working on the timings and musical dynamics of the pieces. We are very clear on the direction of the metal we want to play and we stick to our guns. Very careful consideration was given to the order of the tunes on the album as well to ensure there is a balanced flow of tempos and variation. We don’t want a jackhammer approach throughout the entire album. Tony Iommi’s philosophy of “light and shade” definitely applies here.

Describe the approach to recording the album?

Nino: Once we had selected which tracks to include on our album we worked on all the song structures first. Over time then we finalised all of the song structures for the selected music. Then we completed a series of demo versions of each track. When we were completely satisfied with all of that we got on with the actual final recording of the album. Firstly the drum tracks were recorded along with a pilot demo rhyme guitar track. The next step was to then record all of the bass guitar tracks. We then re-recorded all the fine tuned rhyme guitar tracks & harmonies to our liking. Then I completed all the lead guitar work. And then finally all the vocal tracks were recorded at the end to complete the process. The whole album was then mastered.

How long “Matrimony in Madness” was in the making?

Tom: Around three years all up including the artwork. A number of the songs were already in progress while we were completing our EP “Drakaena Scythia”.

Which bands or artists influenced your work on the release?

Toby: We all have similar tastes in metal but at the same time we’re very different.  Tom is very keen on his teutonic thrash and death metal, Nino has very progressive leanings and I’m a big fan of folk metal and melodeath.  For Matrimony in Madness the influences that shaped the album came strongly from bands like Kreator, Nevermore, Dream Theater and Death.  Indeed our single, Echoes Of The Pharisee was written in tribute to the late Death frontman, Chuck Schuldiner.

What is your view on technology in music?

Nino: Well my personal view is that technology in music is a double edged sword. It has certainly made it more affordable and cheaper to record your own music in your own space. Whether that is in your bedroom or a small free space somewhere else. You can make some quite good recordings within a small home studio now. On the flip side though, it definitely hinders the music artists ability to sell their own music. Obviously this is because technology makes it easy to share music & download music illegally via peer to peer platform and torrent sites. All we as musicians who spend are lot of our time and effort making our music can hope for is that firstly; 1. If someone downloads our music for free and really likes what they hear, then they please support us by buying the music. 2. If they could like and follow us on social media platforms plus stream our music via Spotify, Deezer, YouTube, iTunes  etc.… Every little bit helps self funded independent bands like us continue to make more music for our fans & supporters.

Do you see your music as serving a purpose beyond music? 

Tom: For sure! Our music is an attitude and a philosophy. We want to deliver thought provoking themes that stamp an impression on the listener. Our music, like all metal is a form of therapy and escape from the bullshit around us.

What are your plans for the future?

Toby: We are already hard at work writing songs for our next release.  However, another big goal for us is to fill out the rest of our band and play some live shows.  We’re excited for people to not only hear our music but to see us perform it live!

Nino: Yes we will keep trying to promote our ‘Matrimony In Madness’ album as much as we can into the future. Down the track we definitely would like to continue to record new material & as Toby also mentioned, complete our lineup and play some live shows.

Matrimony in Madness is out now; get it from Bandcamp. For more info about Scythian Fate visit their website, and follow them on Facebook and Instagram.

The post SCYTHIAN FATE: Forging Own Paths appeared first on Prog Sphere.

Edition 196 of Steve Blease’s Heavy Elements is now available as a podcast.

Playlist:

Mike LePond’s Silent Assassins – Apocalypse Rider
Opeth – Heart in Hand
The Reticent – Enemy
Intervals – A Voice Within
Skyharbor – Sunshine Dust

Epic at 11: Heaven’s Cry – The Day The System Failed

Adrift – The Call
The Five Hundred – Buried

Album of the Week: Triosphere – The Heart of the Matter

Relentless
The Heart’s Dominion
The Sphere

Orphaned Land – The Cave

PROGRESSIVE TRACKS SHOW #322 (Apollo 11 – Prog You To The Moon And Back)

This week’s edition of The Progressive Tracks Show is a creation; an experience best enjoyed in solitude. The (mostly) instrumental songs and historical audio clips were carefully pieced together to evoke emotion; to portray the Apollo 11 mission through the emotional power of music.
I do hope you can take time to sit back and enjoy it!

And remember, you can access podcasts of any previous Progressive Tracks Show at: http://www.progzilla.com/?s=progressive+tracks (there are over 160 now!).

PLAYLIST:

  • Red Kite – “13 Enemas For Good Luck” from Red Kite on RareNoise (2019)
  • King Crimson – “Separation (edit)” from The Elements of King Crimson Tourbox 2014 on DGM (2016)
  • Elder – “Illusory Motion” from The Gold & Silver Sessions on Blues Funeral Recordings (2019)
  • District 97 – “After Orbit Mission” from Screens on Cherry Red Records (2019)
  • Vespero – “Watching The Earth Rise” from Hollow Moon on Tonzonen Records (2018)
  • Fabio La Manna – “Luna2” from EBE on Via Nocturna (2016)
  • Spirit – “Space Child” from Twelve Dreams of Dr. Sardonicus on Ode/Epic/Legacy (1970)
  • Polska Radio One – “Launch #93” from Cosmos Inside on Trail Records (2014)
  • Camel – “Lunar Sea” from Moonmadness on UMC-Decca (1976)
  • Arcade Messiah – “Moon Signal” from II on Stereohead Records (2015)
  • Maat Lander – “Meteors Serenade” from Seasons of Space – Book #2 on Clostridium Records (2018)
  • Quarkspace  – “Space Folds Upon Itself” from All These Suns on Quarkspace (2018)
  • Blueneck – “Apogee” from Epilogue on Denovali Records (2012)
  • Astralingua – “Space Blues” from Space Blues – Single on Midnight Lamp Records (2019)
  • Eric Baule – “Touching The Earth” from Revelations Adrift on Independent (2015)
  • Aisles – “Hero” from 4:45 AM on Presagio Records (2013)

If you have comments or suggestions for show topics/ music (always welcome), feel free to contact me any time via email:  ProgTracks@KPTZ.org

Edition 167 of THE PROG MILL first broadcast on Progzilla Radio Sunday 21 July 2019, with two hours of superb melodic and symphonic progressive music, is now also available to stream anytime you like or download. This week’s show also includes the world radio premiere of two tracks from the forthcoming new Kaprekar’s Constant album “Depth of Field”

The Playlist

1 Magic Pie – Table For Two (Fragments of the 5th Element)
2 Mindspeak – Orbit – Catch (Eclipse Chaser)
3 Mind Sculpture – The Gift (Single)
4 Openspace – On The Edge (Openspace)
5 Pro-Age – Homecoming (MPD)
6 Kaprekar’s Constant – Rosherville Part 1 (Depth of Field)
7 Kaprekar’s Constant – Rosherville Part 2 (Depth of Field)
8 We Are Kin – The Fawn (Bruised Sy)
9 Drifting Sun – Stay With Me (Single)
10 Peter Banks – Astral Traveler (Tales from Yesterday)
11 Acqua Fragile – Morning Comes (Acqua Fragile)
12 Intergalactic Huso Orchestra – In Your 80’s Dreams (Spaced Out)
13 Our Destiny – The World is Waiting (Awakening)
14 Beach Boys – Surfs Up (Surfs Up)

You can hear The Prog Mill on Progzilla Radio at these times every week (www.progzilla.com/listen – via the tune in radio app and on internet radios):

Sundays 10pm – Midnight UK (2100UTC) – main broadcast
Tuesdays 0300-0500 UK (0200UTC) – For North America – Mon 7pm Pacific/10pm Eastern
Tuesdays 2300-0100UK (2200 UTC) – 1500 Pacific/1800 Eastern
Saturdays 6-8pm UK (1700 UTC) – Family friendly Saturday evening repeat

Your melodic and symphonic progressive rock music suggestions for the show are very welcome. Just email shaun@progzilla.com, or message via twitter @shaunontheair or facebook.com/theprogmill