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All posts for the month February, 2018

Edition 95 of THE PROG MILL – first broadcast on Progzilla Radio on Sunday 25th February, is now available to stream anytime or download.

Two hours of superb melodic & symphonic progressive music mainly chosen by the Prog Mill listeners. Here is this weeks playlist:

1 Hangover Paradise – Flowers in the Rain (Out of Sight)
2 OH – Deserted Eyes (Single)
3 Sintesi Del Viaggio Di Es – Sabbia (tra le mani) (Il Sole Alle Spalle)
4 Wave – Between (Between)
5 Millenium – Are We Lost (44 Minutes)
6 Giuseppe Morganti – Zappando qua e la (Il Re Muore)
7 Twin Age – New Gate (Month of the Year)
8 Aeon Satori – Eyes Open (Behold the Pale Horse) (Aeon Satori EP)
9 Minds Eye – A Rabbit in the Hat (Walking on h20)
10 Mind Games – Glory of Night (MMX)
11 Flutatious – Acid Rain (Festival)
12 Joseph Bridge – Brenda and the Breadheads (Marvins Sanitarium)
13 Dream Theater – Xanadu (A Farewell to Kings 40th Anniversary Edition)
14 Camel – Stationary Traveller (The Snow Goose)

You can hear the Prog Mill every week on Progzilla Radio, online at www.progzilla.com, via the tune in radio app and on internet radio platforms, at these times:

Sundays 10pm – Midnight UK (2200UTC) – MAIN BROADCAST
Tuesdays 3-5am UK (0300UTC) – North America Service – Mon 7pm Pacific/10pm Eastern)
Tuesdays 11pm-1am UK (2300UTC)
Saturdays 6-8pm UK (1800UTC) – Family friendly teatime repeat!

The podcast which you can listen to anytime or download is usually online by Monday evening each week too.

Your melodic/symphonic progressive music suggestions or submissions for airplay are very much appreciated. Contact shaun@progzilla.com, or message via facebook.com/theprogmill or twitter @shaunontheair

This news story was originally published here: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/ProgNewsProgarchives/~3/Zvd2C02Gz04/forum_posts.asp

Hey gang!

Wanted to let you know that we are very close to finishing the second Colouratura album, Unfamiliar Skies.

It’s a bit of a hodgepodge, like the last one, but we feel very strongly that it is a much stronger, much more focused work than the first. It’s also backed by a band on most of the tracks, so it ‘feels’ a bit more live and like a group project.

We also dabble a bit with progressive rock, with a 10 minute suite (featuring Dave Newhouse of The Muffins on saxes). You can hear an excerpt of that track here. There’s also a bit of a stoner metal / Black Sabbath homage, and a bit of a beat poetry / funk number with Michael Dawson on sax!

Other guests include Damon Waitkus of Jack o’ the Clock, plus some supreme local talent in Derek Pavlic, a guitarist who’s something of a Frank Zappa disciple, local ‘odd time signature guru’ Eric Holskey, and more.

Today, we’re launching our gofundme campaign to press the album, complete with a beautiful design byEric Kearns. If you like what you hear, please consider helping us to reach our goal and put out a truly independent release. It was entirely produced in a studio I built from the ground up, so it’s a fairly significant project for us to complete and we are beyond excited to share it with you.

Thank you!

Ian Beabout

Edited by progrockdeepcuts – 6 hours 12 minutes ago at 10:22

This news story was originally published here: https://www.prog-sphere.com/interviews/kharva-interview/
Kharva

Karlstad, Sweden-based metal four-piece Kharva debuted in January with a four-track demo release available digitally via Bandcamp. Guitarist Micke Larsson shares for Prog Sphere what it took to record and put out this demo, the band’s hopes for it to be properly released, and more.

Define the mission of Kharva.

I don’t really know if we have a mission as such. We like to make and play music as much and as often as possible.

Tell me about the creative process that informed your debut demo release and the themes it captures.

We’ve all been very much part of creating the songs. Each and every band-member has contributed with something to every song on the demo. For example the first song on the demo – “Present Tense.” It comes from some riffs that bass-player Devan came up with and played for me once at a rehearsal, and that sounded fairly black metal. Drummer Charlie and I worked with the riffs and recorded a demo with software drums and a preliminary arrangement for the song. Singer Jacob wrote the lyrics while we rehearsed it. I think he actually re-wrote and adapted some lyrics that I had written for another song for this one. The song also got re-arranged when we rehearsed it so that the lyric part would sort of fit. And that is pretty much how we do shit. Everyone of us contributes with bits and pieces here and there in any given song.

Kharva (demo cover art)

What is the message you are trying to give with it? 

I don’t know if there is a message. The lyrical themes differ and I would say that the lyrics are more of reflections on certain things or life in general than messages to be sort of preached. The first song “Present Tense” has really positive lyrics about seizing life while you are alive. “Unstable Genius” is about Donald Trump and “Cheers Jeff” is about Jefferey Dahmer, so there is no uniform lyrical theme for the demo. The music in itself express anger and frustration but also energy so there is dualism and maybe that in itself is a message.

How did you document the music while it was being formulated?

We have recored at least one, often more, pre-production demo versions of every song. Often we record ideas that we play at rehearsal on an iPhone and after that we record and arrange the idea into a song in a DAW with software drums. All that is part of the creative process.

Why have you decided to label this release as a demo, considering that it’s produced fairly well for today’s standards?

The main reason is that we don’t have a label or record company to put it out for us and we can’t be bothered to put money into pressing CD’s or vinyl or whatever to make it a physical release ourselves, because we don’t have any distribution. We have put a lot of effort into it. That is true. And it would probably make a great debut release. Hopefully someone will be interested in putting it out for us. We are open to suggestions on that subject. However we have burnt our own CD-r’s to give away at gigs and the demo will also be out on Spotify and iTunes and you-name-it pretty soon, so one may say it is a semi-release, if there is such a thing.

Is the dynamic flow of the songs carefully architected?

We talk quite a lot about the arrangement of the songs and what it does to the dynamics. And we also work a lot with the arrangements. So yes, I would say the dynamics are pretty much worked over.

Describe the approach to recording this demo. 

We want our songs to come across as intense and in-your-face. To sort of hit you and leave you with some sort of feeling. Whether it is disgust or liking doesn’t really matter that much as long as the listener feels something. And this approach has of course permeated the performance, the recording process and last but not at the least the mixing and producing. Another approach has been to actually learn something from recording and to develop ourselves as musicians in the process of recording our music. We have therefore done everything ourselves. Everything from writing the songs to work as our own recording-engineers and mixing and mastering the recordings.

Which bands or artists influenced your work on the release?

I think that it is almost impossible to answer that question. We all listen to all kinds of different music and bands and artist. Everything from crust-punk and grindcore to Pink Floyd and Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young really. The death metal influences are pretty obvious and so are the hardcore influences. But I believe there is a fair part of grunge and nu-metal in there as well.

What is your view on technology in music?

For me personally, the digital revolution with the possibilities of recording and putting out high-quality recordings as easily as one can today, is simply fantastic. When I started playing in bands and making music in the eighties good recording studios were expensive and and unavailable for most young bands and we had to rely on cassette tapes to distribute our music. Today you can have a good recording studio in your computer with any DAW really. The internet makes it easy to put out music and reach people all over the world.

Do you see your music as serving a purpose beyond music?

For ourselves within the band I believe it serves a lot of purposes. With the risk of coming across as sententious I believe creating art is possibly the most fulfilling and meaningful activity that a person can do. That our music would be as meaningful to others as some bands music has been to me is something I could only wish for. But it would make me very pleased and touched if that would be the case.

What are your plans for the future?

We like to play live as much as possible and we have a few dates coming up in the nearest. But we want more gigs and possibly do a tour. We also have a bunch of songs that we are working with and that we would like to record soon.

Follow Kharva on FacebookYouTube and SoundCloud.

This news story was originally published here: http://www.prog-sphere.com/interviews/kharva-interview/
Kharva

Karlstad, Sweden-based metal four-piece Kharva debuted in January with a four-track demo release available digitally via Bandcamp. Guitarist Micke Larsson shares for Prog Sphere what it took to record and put out this demo, the band’s hopes for it to be properly released, and more.

Define the mission of Kharva.

I don’t really know if we have a mission as such. We like to make and play music as much and as often as possible.

Tell me about the creative process that informed your debut demo release and the themes it captures.

We’ve all been very much part of creating the songs. Each and every band-member has contributed with something to every song on the demo. For example the first song on the demo – “Present Tense.” It comes from some riffs that bass-player Devan came up with and played for me once at a rehearsal, and that sounded fairly black metal. Drummer Charlie and I worked with the riffs and recorded a demo with software drums and a preliminary arrangement for the song. Singer Jacob wrote the lyrics while we rehearsed it. I think he actually re-wrote and adapted some lyrics that I had written for another song for this one. The song also got re-arranged when we rehearsed it so that the lyric part would sort of fit. And that is pretty much how we do shit. Everyone of us contributes with bits and pieces here and there in any given song.

Kharva (demo cover art)

What is the message you are trying to give with it? 

I don’t know if there is a message. The lyrical themes differ and I would say that the lyrics are more of reflections on certain things or life in general than messages to be sort of preached. The first song “Present Tense” has really positive lyrics about seizing life while you are alive. “Unstable Genius” is about Donald Trump and “Cheers Jeff” is about Jefferey Dahmer, so there is no uniform lyrical theme for the demo. The music in itself express anger and frustration but also energy so there is dualism and maybe that in itself is a message.

How did you document the music while it was being formulated?

We have recored at least one, often more, pre-production demo versions of every song. Often we record ideas that we play at rehearsal on an iPhone and after that we record and arrange the idea into a song in a DAW with software drums. All that is part of the creative process.

Why have you decided to label this release as a demo, considering that it’s produced fairly well for today’s standards?

The main reason is that we don’t have a label or record company to put it out for us and we can’t be bothered to put money into pressing CD’s or vinyl or whatever to make it a physical release ourselves, because we don’t have any distribution. We have put a lot of effort into it. That is true. And it would probably make a great debut release. Hopefully someone will be interested in putting it out for us. We are open to suggestions on that subject. However we have burnt our own CD-r’s to give away at gigs and the demo will also be out on Spotify and iTunes and you-name-it pretty soon, so one may say it is a semi-release, if there is such a thing.

Is the dynamic flow of the songs carefully architected?

We talk quite a lot about the arrangement of the songs and what it does to the dynamics. And we also work a lot with the arrangements. So yes, I would say the dynamics are pretty much worked over.

Describe the approach to recording this demo. 

We want our songs to come across as intense and in-your-face. To sort of hit you and leave you with some sort of feeling. Whether it is disgust or liking doesn’t really matter that much as long as the listener feels something. And this approach has of course permeated the performance, the recording process and last but not at the least the mixing and producing. Another approach has been to actually learn something from recording and to develop ourselves as musicians in the process of recording our music. We have therefore done everything ourselves. Everything from writing the songs to work as our own recording-engineers and mixing and mastering the recordings.

Which bands or artists influenced your work on the release?

I think that it is almost impossible to answer that question. We all listen to all kinds of different music and bands and artist. Everything from crust-punk and grindcore to Pink Floyd and Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young really. The death metal influences are pretty obvious and so are the hardcore influences. But I believe there is a fair part of grunge and nu-metal in there as well.

What is your view on technology in music?

For me personally, the digital revolution with the possibilities of recording and putting out high-quality recordings as easily as one can today, is simply fantastic. When I started playing in bands and making music in the eighties good recording studios were expensive and and unavailable for most young bands and we had to rely on cassette tapes to distribute our music. Today you can have a good recording studio in your computer with any DAW really. The internet makes it easy to put out music and reach people all over the world.

Do you see your music as serving a purpose beyond music?

For ourselves within the band I believe it serves a lot of purposes. With the risk of coming across as sententious I believe creating art is possibly the most fulfilling and meaningful activity that a person can do. That our music would be as meaningful to others as some bands music has been to me is something I could only wish for. But it would make me very pleased and touched if that would be the case.

What are your plans for the future?

We like to play live as much as possible and we have a few dates coming up in the nearest. But we want more gigs and possibly do a tour. We also have a bunch of songs that we are working with and that we would like to record soon.

Follow Kharva on FacebookYouTube and SoundCloud.

This news story was originally published here: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/ProgNewsProgarchives/~3/YjRufQeZXrI/forum_posts.asp
Melodic Revolution Records is thrilled to sign International prog band TEN JINN for a multi-album deal. 


“Sisyphus” was originally released in Europe in early 2017 as a digital-only release by Ten Jinn, however, there has been a large demand for a CD release and even a vinyl release. The CD is set for an early spring (2018) release.

About The Album

Sisyphus is an eight-part programmatic work that tells the story of the founder and King of Corinth after whom it is named. Because of affronts to the gods while alive, Sisyphus was condemned in death to spend eternity in Hades rolling a boulder to the top of a mountain, only to have it roll back down each time he completed the task; this also speaks to the essay, “The Myth of Sisyphus,” by Albert Camus, who used the myth as a means to comment on the senseless, repetitive drudgery of modern life.

Originally written as a classical work (a symphonic poem for string orchestra and piano) the Ten Jinn production involved reworking the piece to include the addition of rock instrumentation. We got the idea to add vocals to make it more consistent with earlier Ten Jinn albums, and the plan was then to fill out the record with other new material; however, at one point during the process we decided to do an instrumental mix and use it as a “flip-side,” instead, because we wanted to include a version that was representative of the original idea, which had its own unique “flavor.”

John Paul Strauss: Lead and backing vocals, Keyboards

Mark Wickliffe: Drums, Bass & backing vocals

Ken Skoglund: Guitars & backing vocals

Mike Matier: Guitars

A Statement from John Strauss

I have known about Nick Katona of Melodic Revolution Records for a while now, having seen him at RosFest for several years in a row (donning his signature top hat with a classy presentation of product second to none). However, it was only during the 2017 iteration that I finally had a chance to speak with him at great length. What I found was a passionate, intelligent man; a kindred spirit in attitude towards life in general, and music in particular.

I went to his website and checked out a number of the artists on his label. What I found was an eclectic offering of artists all with one thing in common – superior musical talent. Along with a laid-back, yet serious, approach to getting this music heard, I thought that his label would be the perfect partner for Ten Jinn. So, I handed him a promo copy our new record Sisyphus, we spoke again a while later and decided to work together. I speak for myself, and rest of the band, when I say that I am very excited about our upcoming CD release of Sisyphus on MRR, and hope this will be the first of many more to come.

What the Critics are saying.
is it classical or prog? The answer is yes. All that’s missing is more of the same, which hopefully will come sooner than later from this seriously underrated act.
4 1/2 out of 5 Stars
– John Collinge, Progression Magazine

If you enjoy the band Enid, you will enjoy this one as well, and won’t get bored a minute here.
4 out of 5 Stars
– rdtprog, Prog Archives

Important Links:

Edited by MRR – 4 hours 19 minutes ago at 15:00

Music is our voice, because every song tells a story

It had been a good while since I heard anything from the TJ camp. I met J.P. Strauss way back at Prog Fest ’98 in Los Angeles. Super nice guy. He gifted me his band’s then-new debut CD. (The drummer added “Spread the jams!”) I like the comparison to The Enid in the one review.

This news story was originally published here: http://theprogressiveaspect.net/blog/2018/02/25/rausch-book-ii/

Doug Rausch is a person who is willing to speak, or should I say, sing what is on his mind, and that is a rare commodity in music today… or anywhere, for that matter. This album is an honest story of one person’s life experience and interpretations of life, or as Doug Rausch describes it: “Music is capable of the extraordinary. Its healing powers are all but a matter of public record. Music is always there for you, day or night, regardless of circumstance. It is timeless, if we ourselves are not. Music will love you unconditionally… and it will ask for nothing in return… That said, the love is usually reciprocated.”

If you are ready for some of that kind of straight talk, this will be an enjoyable album for you.

Rausch, the band, is made up of Doug Rausch on vocals and piano, Joe Fine on bass, Gary Wehrkamp on guitar and Chris Ruffini on drums. Book II is their second album, following the critically acclaimed debut Rausch released back in 2009, and features guest appearances from Fates Warning drummer Mark Zonder, keyboards from Ryo Okumoto of Spock’s Beard and the guitars of Brendt Allman from Shadow Gallery.

[embedded content]

Soft piano opens Greener Grass, as a prelude to the first appearance of Doug Rausch’s voice:

“You want control
I can’t say no
That’s how we go.”

I’m not sure who his voice might be compared to, so I will suggest a cross between a young Neil Morse and Mike Patton of Faith No More. As the track moves forward the synths and keyboards take off with full support of bass, kicking drums and soaring lead guitars, turning into a powerful Queen–like musical experience. What a fantastic way to open an album.

Swansong is a fight song, full of powerful lead guitar solos and licks, deep bass, and powerful drums. The lyrics are inspired:

“I’m still standing here for one last shot
Must be some kind of a miracle
We will rise again!”

It’s the excellent piano work, which reminds me so much of early, bluesy Queen. It’s not We Are The Champions, but it’s hard to argue that this song would create some heroic moments if played live in an arena full of rock fans.

Drain, the album’s epic track starts with Doug singing:

“I don’t really care anymore.
I know I am living, but what for?”

And this is what I meant about Doug’s ability to be brutally honest about how he is feelings, and his fearless lyrical explanation about a state of mind, that we have all felt at one time or another. That piano solo is one of the best musical segments on the album. As Drain builds, Doug comes back with powerful lyrics set initially to acoustic guitar, electric then filling in the sound. An almost Roger Waters’ level Wall portrait! Then the band take it up another notch with the drums, bass and more electric guitar, while the darker piano keys pound in support of the progressively darker lyrics, a solid statement which makes this one of the best tracks on the album and one of the best I have heard this year.

An excellent keyboard vibe opens Irked – one which could continue on forever as far as I am concerned, it sounds so good. But as the drums and keyboard work are added, expanding the sound further, another of the great tracks on the album is created. The lyrics are powerful and reflective of what each of us is faced with at some point in our lives. They are so real, so why hasn’t anyone else done this before? Well, they have: John Lennon and Paul McCartney, Tom Waits, Bob Dylan, and Roger Waters, just to name a few, but so few do it anymore. Bluesy guitars mix well with piano and drums, so much unique sounding music you will wonder how this guy has not been all over the radio. As The Beatles once said, “Well, you know, We’re doing what we can”. Yes, I want to do what I can to get the message out that this is a great album.

Good Day, is a solid rocker about a good day…when Doug “breaks even”. Solid Queen-like vocal harmonies and great guitar and drums, one of the heaviest songs on the album. Excellent! The End is not the powerful statement that The Doors made, but this is equally unique and memorable. The lyrics are direct and unfiltered; “Somehow I’m still here. Dangling by a string…Surely there has got to be more to life than this.”. The electric guitar solo is unforgettable and the drumming on the ending is out of this world. And…if you close your eyes…you may be able to picture in your mind the napalmed jungles from Apocalypse Now.

Time Out is a break in the action after some of the strongest parts of the album. This reminds me of a Beatles–like break that seems necessary amid all the majesty being recorded, like Martha My Dear between Happiness is a Warm Gun and I’m So Tired. But I still appreciated Martha My Dear.

Speechless opens with a drum and guitar assault, similar to a wonderful combination of the inspirations from Rush’s Cygnus X-1 or 2112, and Dream Theater’s Pull Me Under. Then Doug lifts off on lead electric guitars and punching drums and bass.

Slow Suite: II. Isolation opens with inspired deep piano strokes and Doug singing “Send me another song…God knows where I’m going”. Sometimes, you just need to be alone to create your music and then share it with the world.

You really need to hear this album for yourself. It is unique and challenging and when was the last time you heard challenging music? Buy this and play it… I double dog dare you!

TRACK LISTING
01. Greener Grass (5:28)
02. Swansong (3:59)
03. Drain (10:36)
04. Irked (9:39)
05. Good Day (3:42)
06. The End (9:44)
07. Time Out (4:52)
08. Speechless (5:02)
09. Slow Suite: II. Isolation (8:16)

Total Time – 61:18

MUSICIANS
Doug Rausch – Vocals, Piano
Joe Fine – Bass
Gary Wehrkamp – Guitar
Chris Ruffini – Drums
~ With:
Mark Zonder – Drums
Ryo Okumoto – Keyboards
Brendt Allman – Guitar

ADDITIONAL INFO
Record Label: Independent
Country of Origin: U.S.A.
Date of Release: 2nd February 2018

LINKS
Rausch – Website | Facebook | Bandcamp | Twitter

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Tales from the tiger Moth Podcast 68 – Tribute to Colin tench

  1. Built for the Future – Planets
  2. Supertramp – Bloody Well Right
  3. Pendragon – Back In The Spotlight
  4. Colin Tench Project – And So Today
  5. Colin Tench Project – He’s Gone
  6. Colin Tench Project – Darkness Falls
  7. Tiger Moth Tales – Take The Memory
  8. Camel – Three Wishes
  9. Michael Bentine – Scottland Yard
  10. Jordan Rudess – Screaming Head
  11. It Bites – Bullet In The Barrrel
  12. Bartok – Six Dances In Bulgarian Rhythm iii
  13. Stanley Holloway – The Lion And Albert
  14. George Duke – Love Reborn
  15. Hoggwash – Spellbound
  16. Haken – Celestial Elixir
  17. Queen – Good Company
  18. Michael Bentine – Moskow Comercial Radio
  19. Sound Of Contact – I Am (Dimensionaut)
  20. Agents Of Mercy – Freak Of Life
  21. Genesis – Burning Rope (Live)

 Podcast 67 Tales from The tiger Moth  2017 Album Round up

  1. Kaipa – Children Of The Sounds
  2. The Colin Tench Project – Didn’t Even Wanna Do It. Did it Anyway
  3. The Colin Tench Project – Welcome To Your World
  4. Comedy Of Errors – Song of Wandering Jacomus
  5. Nad Sylvan – What Have You Done
  6. Lonely Robot – The Big Dream
  7. Kim Seviour – The Dive
  8. Magenta – Trojan
  9. Dave Kerzner – Reckless
  10. Steven Wilson – Pariah
  11. Big Big Train – The Passing Widow
  12. Charlie Cawood – Apotheosis
  13. Robert Ramsay – Living Will
  14. Robert Ramsay – Tramps In Their Purest Form
  15. Barock Project – Broken
  16. Steve Hackett – In the Skeleton Gallery
  17. The Colin Tench Project – Under The Conker Tree
  18. The Colin Tench Project – Now Get On Your Way

 

Podcast 66 Takes from the Tiger moth Christmas show now available for Download

  1. Steve Hackett – Carry On up the Vicarage
  2. The Moody Blues – The Day Begins
  3. The Prog World Orchestra – Joy To The World
  4. Aviva Omnibus – Flower Fever
  5. Morecambe & Wise – A Wassailing
  6. Samuel Cant – A Wonderful Christmas Time (Not)
  7. Kaipa – On The Edge Of New Horizons
  8. Tiger Moth Tales – Noel Nouvelet
  9. Genesis – White Mountain
  10. Pink Floyd – High Hopes
  11. Freiheit – Keeping The Dream Alive
  12. Samuel Cant – Crapping In A Winter Wonder Land
  13. Charlie Cawood – The Divine Abstract- The Earth’s Answer
  14. Charlie Cawood – The Divine Abstract- Fearful Symmetry
  15. Big Big Train – Merry Christmas
  16. Beatles – Golden Slumbers
  17. Beatles – Carry That Weight Beatles – In The End
  18. Willy Rushton – Pantomyme
  19. Tiger Moth Tales – Sleigh Ride
  20. The Prog World Orchestra – Shred Ride- Sleigh Ride-Winter Wonderland
  21. Chris De Burgh – A Spaceman Came Traveling (Live)

Prog-Watch 508 is now available at Progwatch.com

My special guest for this episode is Michael Whiteman, bassist, singer, and composer from I Am The Manic Whale! Michael and I chat about all sorts of things, from the origins of the band to the future of “progressive rock”. Along the way I will, of course, spin lots of great music from Michael and the rest of his pod-mates in I Am The Manic Whale!

 

508: In Conversation with Michael Whiteman of I Am The Manic Whale