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All posts for the month October, 2017

This news story was originally published here: http://theprogressiveaspect.net/blog/2017/10/31/wingfield-reuter-sirkis-lighthouse/

Lighthouse is a companion album to the mighty fine The Stone House, released earlier in the year but actually recorded before it during a marathon session in 2016, from which three albums will eventually emerge blinking into the uncaring daylight. The absence of bassist Yaron Stavi from this session sees his lower register taken by Markus Reuter’s Touch Guitar, and for whatever reason, this improvised creature is more of a progressive-experimental rock beast than the jazz animal of The Stone House, but this is powerful and feral rock of a kind that is flung out on a limb, billions of miles from conventionality.

Zinc and Derecho are powered by Asif Sirkis’ thunderous rumble of insistent rhythms, and the combination of Markus Reuter’s Touch Guitar and Mark Wingfield’s more conventional (hah!) guitar playing recall similar territory explored by Mastelotto, Gunn, and Fripp in the ProjeKcts, although by the time the blistering opener climbs to its incendiary climax, any comparison to anything at all is moot as this scorched earth fire monster incinerates all before it. Possibly the most compelling and fearsome opening two tracks of any album I have heard this year.

Ghost Light narrates illogical lifeforms that live many leagues under the waves, making lairs next to bubbling sulphurous springs in near boiling water. Impossible calciform structures reaching ever upwards in impenetrable darkness are briefly illuminated by symphonic washes of otherworldy sound from the textural imagination of Markus Reuter, while Mark Wingfield howls into the void, or in total contrast, soothes the troubled soul.

The craft resurfaces during Magnetic to find increasingly turbulent seas in the thrall of an approaching mighty storm. The tension is palpable as skittering nervous beats steer the craft through increasingly troubled waters, the flotsam and jetsam being tossed every which way on breaking waves of howling guitars and mounting insistent drum clatter.

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A Hand In The Dark and Transverse Wave offer up a prayer and hear its response. Two extremely poetic pieces led by Mark’s fluid and elegiac improvisations, a keening incantation and commune with strange gods. The pounding excursion up and down and around dislocated scales that is Surge ends this exhausting album, one that has taken the listener on a journey into hitherto rarely explored dusty corners of the imagination. Together with The Stone House you will not hear two more essential or energetic albums of improvisation seat-of-the–pants playing this or any other year. Buy this now!

TRACK LISTING
01. Zinc (7:47)
02. Derecho (8:29)
03. Ghost Light (14:19)
04. Magnetic (11:13)
05. A Hand In The Dark (4:54)
06. Transverse Wave (5:19)
07. Surge (4:30)

Total Time – 56:15

MUSICIANS
Mark Wingfield – Guitar
Markus Reuter – Touch Guitar
Asaf Sirkis – Drums

ADDITIONAL INFO
Record Label: MoonJune Records
Catalogue#: MJR088
Date of Release: 11th September 2017

LINKS
Wingfield Reuter Sirkis – Bandcamp
Mark Wingfield – Website | Facebook
Markus Reuter – Website | Facebook
Asaf Sirkis – Website | Facebook

Tags: , , ,



Northern Star   26th Oct  2017

 

  1. Northern Star Pallas Theme
  2. Fats Domino – Ain’t That a shame RIP Fats
  3. Fish – Boston Tea party
  4. Deep Purple – Lazy
  5. Unto Us – Plan B
  6. Beneath My Sins – The beauty in the witch
  7. Birdeatsbaby – a part of me
  8. Jon & Vangelis – Far away in Baagad
  9. Playgrounded – Mute
  10. Adam Sandler – Werewolves of London
  11. BBT – The Underfall Yard
  12. Tiger Moth Tales – Hyyge
  13. Elton John – Lucy in the Sky with diamond
  14. Spiritualized – (Come together Live )
  15. The Fierce and The Dead  – Andy Fox
  16. Lesbian bed death – I use my powers for evil
  17. Dire straits – Telegraph Road
  18. Frozen Ocean – The Dyson Swarm
  19. Dave Gilmour – One of these days
  20. Genesis – Dance on a Volcano/Los Endos

 

Tunein on http://tunein.com/radio/Progzilla-Radio-s242911/

The Google app or the Apple App

Repeat Shows Tuesdays 00.00am bst & 3.00pm bst

Podcasts of all the shows are available here

http://www.progzilla.com/category/podcast/northern-star/feed/

Subscribe to the show here

http://www.progzilla.com/shows/northern-star/

If you have an requests or ideas about shows

Or anything else for that matter?

Contact me on Emma@progzilla.com

These Curious Thoughts – Surrounded by Roses

It Bites – Underneath Your Pillow

Sanguine Hum – Bubble Trouble

Gazpacho – The Cage

Tee – City

Gerard – The Acts of the Apostles

Taken – 1985

Combination Head – Clover Road ABC

Unifaun – End-Or-Fin

Jethro Tull – Sparrow On The Schoolyard Wall

Argos – Nursed By Giants Pt1 and Pt5

DeeExpus – Marty and the Magic Moose

This news story was originally published here: https://www.prog-sphere.com/interviews/fabrizio-la-piana-interview/
Fabrizio La Piana

Guitarist and composer Fabrizio La Piana was born in Catania in Italy, but he lives in Amsterdam. The musician has recently completed work on his debut album titled ‘Almond and Coffee,’ and in an interview below he shares what was it like working on this record. He also tells us about his white Suhr stratocaster, gear, growing up in Catania, and more.

Almond and Coffee was recently released. How did it come about?

I wrote some of the songs during the course of time and i have refined the music by playing them with different people/settings. I booked the studio for one day only and my goal was to have the finished drums but things went well enough there for me to decide to keep the material as we playied as much as possible to have something that sounds a bit like a live in the studio. Then I just releaseD it through CDBaby, they would take care of distribution on the Internet but also physical copies if you ask for.

What was the vision that propelled Almond and Coffee and what made this the right time to pursue that vision?

I wrote this album in total freedom, not thinking of trying to please any particular type of audience. I wanted this album to be a picture of who I am and what are my musical tastes and influences at the moment.

Almond and Coffee

What was the creative chemistry for Almond and Coffee like?

Bassist Bernhard Hollinger and drummer Niels Voskuil are well rounded musicians. They learn songs incredibly fast and having a jazz background but being capable of playing in many different styles; they gave an amazing contribution to this album. Playing with them feels very easy and natural and i love the sound they have on their instrument.

Speaking of the album’s creative process, provide some insight into it.

I start by noodling around with the guitar, then if I find a sound or an intro riff that feels interesting to me I try to develop it further by jammng on it. Usually that leeds to a finished song that I write on a sheet paper and bring it to the musicians. When we play it the first time I listen to how they play it and how they feel about it. I am open to their suggestions and I am willing to try different grooves and forms. Once the songs are rehearsed I play them live and record them.

Do you have in plan to promote this music live; is there a tour planned down the road?

At the moment I am working on a couple of promotional gigs here in Amsterdam and I hope in the near future to be able to organize some other shows around. Italy would be nice…

Almond and Coffee is described as a blend of Progressive Rock and Jazz. What is it that in your opinion is necessary to make a record be progressive?

In my view “progressive” is a label that can include a lot of very different syles of music, just like the word “fusion.” When I call something progressive it could be anything in between Led Zeppelin and Dream Theater, and in the same time fusion for me could be Weather Report or Cynic. About my album, I think it’s jazz because of the improvised solos and some harmonies. It’s rock because of the sounds and riffs, but if people want to call it jazz rock or fusion or progressive, it is all fine for me. I don’t care too much about genre labelling. I actually like to cross these borders every time I feel the need to.

Fabrizio La Piana

I’ve seen on your promo photos that you are playing Suhr guitars. What in particular made you gravitate towards this brand?

I am into strats for a long time, and I have owned many of them. Suhr guitars are generally well balanced all around instruments; they stay in tune pretty well and the white one I have used for this album is my favourite guitar ever.

Tell me about the gear that you used to record this album.

As mentioned, I have used the white Suhr on all songs, a Maxon overdrive pedal and a Fender Hot Rod Deluxe into a Palmer PDI03 to the studio console desk. Reverbs and delys were added later in the mix.

Did growing up in Catania in any way have impact on you to being a musician?

In Catania there are cafes/pubs or events where bands can perform. Back when I was a kid, club owners were pretty open to any style of music. My friends and bandmates back then were into prog metal and we were able to perform our original songs at quite a few events. That has been my first band and have had a huge inpact on me willing to do become a musician.

Visit Fabrizio’s website here where you can order your copy of ‘Almond and Coffee.’

[embedded content]

This news story was originally published here: http://www.prog-sphere.com/interviews/fabrizio-la-piana-interview/
Fabrizio La Piana

Guitarist and composer Fabrizio La Piana was born in Catania in Italy, but he lives in Amsterdam. The musician has recently completed work on his debut album titled ‘Almond and Coffee,’ and in an interview below he shares what was it like working on this record. He also tells us about his white Suhr stratocaster, gear, growing up in Catania, and more.

Almond and Coffee was recently released. How did it come about?

I wrote some of the songs during the course of time and i have refined the music by playing them with different people/settings. I booked the studio for one day only and my goal was to have the finished drums but things went well enough there for me to decide to keep the material as we playied as much as possible to have something that sounds a bit like a live in the studio. Then I just releaseD it through CDBaby, they would take care of distribution on the Internet but also physical copies if you ask for.

What was the vision that propelled Almond and Coffee and what made this the right time to pursue that vision?

I wrote this album in total freedom, not thinking of trying to please any particular type of audience. I wanted this album to be a picture of who I am and what are my musical tastes and influences at the moment.

Almond and Coffee

What was the creative chemistry for Almond and Coffee like?

Bassist Bernhard Hollinger and drummer Niels Voskuil are well rounded musicians. They learn songs incredibly fast and having a jazz background but being capable of playing in many different styles; they gave an amazing contribution to this album. Playing with them feels very easy and natural and i love the sound they have on their instrument.

Speaking of the album’s creative process, provide some insight into it.

I start by noodling around with the guitar, then if I find a sound or an intro riff that feels interesting to me I try to develop it further by jammng on it. Usually that leeds to a finished song that I write on a sheet paper and bring it to the musicians. When we play it the first time I listen to how they play it and how they feel about it. I am open to their suggestions and I am willing to try different grooves and forms. Once the songs are rehearsed I play them live and record them.

Do you have in plan to promote this music live; is there a tour planned down the road?

At the moment I am working on a couple of promotional gigs here in Amsterdam and I hope in the near future to be able to organize some other shows around. Italy would be nice…

Almond and Coffee is described as a blend of Progressive Rock and Jazz. What is it that in your opinion is necessary to make a record be progressive?

In my view “progressive” is a label that can include a lot of very different syles of music, just like the word “fusion.” When I call something progressive it could be anything in between Led Zeppelin and Dream Theater, and in the same time fusion for me could be Weather Report or Cynic. About my album, I think it’s jazz because of the improvised solos and some harmonies. It’s rock because of the sounds and riffs, but if people want to call it jazz rock or fusion or progressive, it is all fine for me. I don’t care too much about genre labelling. I actually like to cross these borders every time I feel the need to.

Fabrizio La Piana

I’ve seen on your promo photos that you are playing Suhr guitars. What in particular made you gravitate towards this brand?

I am into strats for a long time, and I have owned many of them. Suhr guitars are generally well balanced all around instruments; they stay in tune pretty well and the white one I have used for this album is my favourite guitar ever.

Tell me about the gear that you used to record this album.

As mentioned, I have used the white Suhr on all songs, a Maxon overdrive pedal and a Fender Hot Rod Deluxe into a Palmer PDI03 to the studio console desk. Reverbs and delys were added later in the mix.

Did growing up in Catania in any way have impact on you to being a musician?

In Catania there are cafes/pubs or events where bands can perform. Back when I was a kid, club owners were pretty open to any style of music. My friends and bandmates back then were into prog metal and we were able to perform our original songs at quite a few events. That has been my first band and have had a huge inpact on me willing to do become a musician.

Visit Fabrizio’s website here where you can order your copy of ‘Almond and Coffee.’

[embedded content]

This news story was originally published here: https://www.prog-sphere.com/reviews/perihelion-ship-to-paint-a-bird-of-fire-review/
Perihelion Ship

To Paint a Bird of Fire is the second full-length album by Finnish prog metallers Perihelion Ship, which not only tells a riveting story, but it also serves to accentuate the band’s gift as the omniscient storyteller. Both the arc of the narrative and the incredibly dynamic shifts in mood give Perihelion Ship the opportunity to take their sound into unanticipated directions. What really sets the group apart from other prog metal contemporaries is their idiosyncratic juxtaposition of the darkness and the light, the elegance in life and the unrelenting dread. PH‘s expansive songwriting paves the way for conflicting passages that reflect this dichotomy. Some passages involve harsh, growling vocals alongside pulse-pounding guitars and percussion and others embrace softer moments of desolation cloaked in acoustic guitars and mastermind Andreas Hammer’s voice.

This awe-inspiring balance brings a high level of unpredictability to the album. There is always light at the end of the tunnel, but even when the light seems to dominate the picture, there is always a skulking shadow. Right from the very beginning of this recording, the listener is immersed in the waters of instability, given that any moment of gentleness could give way to demonic outbursts and that any stretch of brutality could transform without warning to understated consolation. In a cathartic intro, “New Sun” opens with an uncanny ambience that is gracefully nudged by a soothing guitar. As the tension builds, the listener knows that collapse is imminent, but it is difficult to pinpoint when or how it will happen. Once the pummeling riff breaks down the door, the intensity reaches an apex of anxiety and angst. Most of these songs unfold over relatively long lengths, during which Perihelion Ship’s music drifts between clashing emotions of anger and sadness.

To Paint a Bird of Fire

Furthermore, the band explores various elements of progressive rock over the course of the album. One can hear faint traces of bands like Yes on the melodic interludes of tracks like “The Sad Mountain.” Also, Perihelion Ship rarely adhere to conventional song structure, instead allowing their songs to germinate of their own accord. Thus, the band ventures so far into the abyss of humanity that the songs themselves take on a life of their own, constantly encountering forks in the road and constantly developing. This forward momentum fuels heavy tracks like “Wind of No Echoes” and closing “New Sun?” On the closing piece, for example, the guitars seethe with ferocity and present a barrage of memorable solos. However, even this track takes a more delicate and reflective turn. From beginning to end, Perihelion Ship’s compositions are multifaceted and highly detailed to the point where each listen can lead to new discoveries whether it be Jari-Markus Kohijoki’s fevered drumming or Hammer’s vivid lyricism.

To Paint a Bird of Fire takes the time to explore the emotional depths of tortured souls. On the peaceful acoustic track “River’s Three,” the guitar reads like the love letter of a man haunted by his unforgiving environment who seeks to fulfill his most primal desire of unconditional love.

On this engrossing concept album, Perihelion Ship allow passion to guide their musical progression. Finding the charm buried within dour soundscapes, the band evoke imagery that is both poignant and indelible. Through and through, the album’s scale is nothing short of breathtaking.

Tracklist:

1. New Sun 10:43
2. Bird of Fire 02:34
3. The Sad Mountain 07:54
4. River’s Three 02:37
5. Wind of No Echoes 06:59
6. New Sun? 11:56

Line-up:

* Andreas Hammer – guitar, vocals
* Jani Konttinen – Hammond organ, Mellotron, synths
* Jari-Markus Kohijoki – drums
* Jouko Lehtonen – bass guitar

Links:

Bandcamp

Facebook

SoundCloud

[embedded content]

This news story was originally published here: http://www.prog-sphere.com/reviews/perihelion-ship-to-paint-a-bird-of-fire-review/
Perihelion Ship

To Paint a Bird of Fire is the second full-length album by Finnish prog metallers Perihelion Ship, which not only tells a riveting story, but it also serves to accentuate the band’s gift as the omniscient storyteller. Both the arc of the narrative and the incredibly dynamic shifts in mood give Perihelion Ship the opportunity to take their sound into unanticipated directions. What really sets the group apart from other prog metal contemporaries is their idiosyncratic juxtaposition of the darkness and the light, the elegance in life and the unrelenting dread. PH‘s expansive songwriting paves the way for conflicting passages that reflect this dichotomy. Some passages involve harsh, growling vocals alongside pulse-pounding guitars and percussion and others embrace softer moments of desolation cloaked in acoustic guitars and mastermind Andreas Hammer’s voice.

This awe-inspiring balance brings a high level of unpredictability to the album. There is always light at the end of the tunnel, but even when the light seems to dominate the picture, there is always a skulking shadow. Right from the very beginning of this recording, the listener is immersed in the waters of instability, given that any moment of gentleness could give way to demonic outbursts and that any stretch of brutality could transform without warning to understated consolation. In a cathartic intro, “New Sun” opens with an uncanny ambience that is gracefully nudged by a soothing guitar. As the tension builds, the listener knows that collapse is imminent, but it is difficult to pinpoint when or how it will happen. Once the pummeling riff breaks down the door, the intensity reaches an apex of anxiety and angst. Most of these songs unfold over relatively long lengths, during which Perihelion Ship’s music drifts between clashing emotions of anger and sadness.

To Paint a Bird of Fire

Furthermore, the band explores various elements of progressive rock over the course of the album. One can hear faint traces of bands like Yes on the melodic interludes of tracks like “The Sad Mountain.” Also, Perihelion Ship rarely adhere to conventional song structure, instead allowing their songs to germinate of their own accord. Thus, the band ventures so far into the abyss of humanity that the songs themselves take on a life of their own, constantly encountering forks in the road and constantly developing. This forward momentum fuels heavy tracks like “Wind of No Echoes” and closing “New Sun?” On the closing piece, for example, the guitars seethe with ferocity and present a barrage of memorable solos. However, even this track takes a more delicate and reflective turn. From beginning to end, Perihelion Ship’s compositions are multifaceted and highly detailed to the point where each listen can lead to new discoveries whether it be Jari-Markus Kohijoki’s fevered drumming or Hammer’s vivid lyricism.

To Paint a Bird of Fire takes the time to explore the emotional depths of tortured souls. On the peaceful acoustic track “River’s Three,” the guitar reads like the love letter of a man haunted by his unforgiving environment who seeks to fulfill his most primal desire of unconditional love.

On this engrossing concept album, Perihelion Ship allow passion to guide their musical progression. Finding the charm buried within dour soundscapes, the band evoke imagery that is both poignant and indelible. Through and through, the album’s scale is nothing short of breathtaking.

Tracklist:

1. New Sun 10:43
2. Bird of Fire 02:34
3. The Sad Mountain 07:54
4. River’s Three 02:37
5. Wind of No Echoes 06:59
6. New Sun? 11:56

Line-up:

* Andreas Hammer – guitar, vocals
* Jani Konttinen – Hammond organ, Mellotron, synths
* Jari-Markus Kohijoki – drums
* Jouko Lehtonen – bass guitar

Links:

Bandcamp

Facebook

SoundCloud

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The Progressive Tracks Show #233 (Descent Into Madness… A Halloween Tale), originally broadcast on Friday, October 27, 2017, is now available to download or listen to anytime you desire.

Not just Halloween music… but music that tells a Halloween story about someone you may know quite well.  This is one to really listen to with the lights off… just make sure to come back to reality after the final track!

PLAYLIST:

  • Kingbathmat – “Fantastic Freak Show Carnival” composed by John Bassett from Fantastic Freak Show Carnival on Stereohead Records
  • Jono – “Man of Misery” from Silence on Jono Music
  • Sonus Umbra – “Doppelganger” from Snapshots from Limbo on Moonchild
  • Major Parkinson – “Beaks of Benevola” from Twilight Cinema on Degaton Records
  •  Jason Rubenstein – “Frankenstein On the Red Line” from New Metal from Old Boxes on Tonecluster Music
  • Major Parkinson – “Sanity Fair” from Major Parkinson on Degaton Records
  • Chelsea Wolfe – “Carrion Flowers” from Abyss on Sargent House
  • Corvus Stone – “Scary Movie Too” from Corvus Stone Unscrewed on Corvus Stone
  • Gideon Freudmann – “Escape to the Asylum” from The Cabinet of Dr Caligari on Octagon Records
  • Midday Veil – “Universes” from This Wilderness on Beyond Beyond is Beyond Records
  • Human Ottoman – “Demon Yard Sale” from  Power Baby on Independent
  • Halloween – Le Proces (The Trial) from Merlin on Musea
  • Subrosa – “The Usher’ from More Constant Than The Stars on Independent

If you have comments (always welcome), or suggestions for show topics/music, feel free to contact me anytime via email:  ProgTracks@KPTZ.org

But first… enjoy the show!

Mike “ProgTracks” Pollack

This news story was originally published here: http://theprogressiveaspect.net/blog/2017/10/30/king-of-the-agogik-morning-star/

In 2015 I reviewed, in some depth, King Of Agogik’s Exlex Beats, the studio project of drummer and multi-instrumentalist Hans Jörg Schmitz. An enjoyable release if not a tad overlong in my humble opinion. Morning Star, albeit about five or so minutes shorter, still clocks in at well over the hour mark. As remarked upon in that review I do feel that the album would have benefitted from some pruning, as is the case with this release, however it is not my place to advise the composer, more to report and critique.

As with previous releases, Schmitz mixes healthy doses of heavy prog, oft bordering into prog metal territory, but balancing this with a wealth of delicate measures of acoustic tracks. On Morning Star these tracks tend to emerge towards the middle of the CD. So from the atmospheric Ignes Fatui we have a series of pieces that appeal more to this reviewer.

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Backtracking slightly, the album booklet features the works of German author and poet Christian Morgenstern, however there’s little evidence of Morgenstern’s nonsensical whimsy to be found on Morning Star. The more underlying theme seems to be war and conflict, emphasized once the soothing atmospherics of Veils Open elapse, the album’s main opener is the ambitious, thirteen minute, The Unavoidable Wayfare…, a thunderous, heavy neo-prog workout, with all but the kitchen sink thrown in to the mix. In contrast …To the Place of Origin is a more accessible, less bombastic piece, with some fine ensemble playing and some fiery soloing.

Once again Schmitz is responsible for much of the instrumentation on the album and along with the drumming, he also undertakes guitar, bass and keyboards. As with previous releases he has called in an impressive list of guest musicians including Steve Unruh (flute & violin), Willowglass’ Andrew Marshall (classical guitar) and Dago Wilms (acoustic & electric guitars).

As with Exlex Beats, Morning Star is interlaced with shorter tracks, with varying degrees of success. Mother of Depth works as an amorphous link to Nyade. Did Tony Iommi drop into the session? Or more likely a reference to Holst’s ‘Bringer of War’, although as the narrative for this track is German I could be wrong on all counts. Finally in this mid-section is The Art of Make-Up. A made-up drum solo?

Truth be said as we hit the halfway mark and as Suprema Lex, another fairly heavy workout, emerged from the speakers, my interest went into a sharp decline. Finally the inclusion of a lengthy montage of found-sounds including Winston Churchill’s “We shall fight on the beaches…” Parliamentary address was the final nail… and a great deal of time elapsed before I returned to this album.

But I did – and bring on Ignes Fatui, a lovely delicate tune with Dago Wilms on acoustic and electric guitars, Scott Taylor on Uilleann Pipes and bringing to mind the Iona duo of Dave Bainbridge and Troy Donockley. Equally engaging is the quirky, grooving A Visit to the Mouse Barber with some great interplay between Pantelis Petrakakis on fretless bass and Hans Jörg on drums. Along with the aforementioned couple of tracks, the album’s epic finale makes a strong closing statement. Mention of Steve Unruh’s contribution here, which is magical.

Probably an age thing, but I do tend to struggle with overtly long albums. With the capacity for 70+ minutes available on CD, there seems to be an ever growing necessity to fill the entire length. Now this would constitute a double album in ‘old money’ and although there are exceptions to the rule, there were very few bands who released successful double albums and none that spring to mind who consistently released double albums, good or bad. Apologies to Hans Jörg for selecting his release to vent my thoughts on this matter…

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So there’s definitely an albums worth of excellent material on Morning Star and depending where your musical allegiances lie, it could be completely opposite to mine. A lot to digest, but certainly worth the time and effort…

TRACK LISTING
01. Veils Open (1:37)
02. The Unavoidable Wayfare… (13:25)
03. …To the Place of Origin (11:09)
04. Mother of Depth (2:05)
05. Nyade (2:55)
06. The Art of Make-Up (2:22)
07. Suprema Lex (8:14)
08. Ignes Fatui (3:37)
09. A Visit to the Mouse Barber (2:09)
10. The End of Dithyramb (20:04)
11. Curtain Call (3:13)

Total Time – 70:18

MUSICIANS
Hans Jörg Schmitz – Drums, Keyboards, Guitar & Bass
~ with:
Steve Unruh – Flute & Violin
Dago Wilms – Acoustic, Electric & Bass Guitars
Gary Farmer – Bass
Pantelis Petrakakis – Bass
Andrew Marshall – Spanish Guitar
Peter Simon – Oboe & Woodwinds
Philipp Schmitz – Keyboards
Chip Gremillion – Keyboards
Erik Vaxjö – Mellotron
Scott Taylor – Uilleann Pipes
Kathrin Daniel – Voice
Viktoria Papen – Voice

ADDITIONAL INFO
Label: Independent
Catalogue#: n/a
Year of Release: 2017

RELEASES
Morning Star (2017)
Exlex Beats (2014)
From A to A (2011)
The Rhythmic Drawing Room (2009)
Aleatorik System (2008)
Membranophonic Experience (2006)

LINKS
King Of The Agogik – Website | Facebook

Tags:



Edition 78 of THE PROG MILL is now available to listen to at your leisure or download. Another two hours of superb melodic/symphonic progressive rock is at your fingertips:

This weeks playlist

1 Hangover Paradise – Take Away (Mirrors)
2 Abel Ganz – Gratuitous Flash (Gratuitous Flash 2016 remaster)
3 Eyesberg – Faceless (Masquerade)
4 Logos – In Fuga (L’enigma Della Vita)
5 La Coscienza di Zeno – La Citta Di Dite (Sensitiva)
6 Flamborough Head – Bless the Wings (That Bring You Back) – (Higher and Higher – A Tribute to the Moody Blues)
7 Moonrise – Surrender to Wi – (Stopover – Life)
8 Tiger Moth Tales – Hygge (The Depths of Winter)
9 Sigur Ros – Saeglopur (We Play Endlessly)
10 White Willow – Floor 67 (Terminal Twilight)
11 Projekt Gemineye – A New Day (A Brand New Day)
12 Multi Story – Star Traveller (Live at Acapella)
13 Libertys Exiles – Pandora (Halloween)
14 Ghostly Beard – Limitless (Infinate)

If you missed it – you can catch The Prog Mill at the following times on Progzilla Radio at www.progzilla.com, also available via the tune in radio app and on internet radios:

Main Broadcast on Sundays between 10pm – Midnight UK (2200-0000 UTC)]
With repeats on Tuesdays at 3am-5am UK (7pm Monday in LA and 10pm Monday in NYC) and 11pm-1am UK (2300-0100 UTC) and Saturdays 6-8pm UK (1800-2000 UTC). The podcast which you can listen to anytime or download is normally posted online each Monday or Tuesday.

Contributions to the show (suggestions or music submissions for symphonic and melodic progressive rock) are very welcome to shaun@progzilla.com or via facebook.com/theprogmill or twitter @shaunontheair