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All posts for the month September, 2017

This news story was originally published here: http://theprogressiveaspect.net/blog/2017/09/28/stefano-giannotti-salvo-lazzara-la-vostra-ansia-di-orizzonte/

Having developed a liking for the music of Italian composer Stefano Giannotti, and having reviewed his band OTEME’s L’Agguato, L’Abbandono, Il Mutamento some eighteen months ago, it was a nice surprise to receive a copy of his latest collaboration in the post quite a while ago now. Like the OTEME album it has sat neglected for far too long before I plucked up the courage to write about it. It seems Stefano’s work fills me with dread in anticipation, but I really do not know why I have this weird perception of Stefano’s ultimately gentle muse. All I can offer are my humble apologies for not getting around sooner to giving his work the attention it deserves, but my mojo had gone astray for a while, that’s at least part of the excuse!

Stefano is most certainly a forward thinking composer, and I just knew that contained within the zeros and ones within this shiny disc would be some of the most adventurous music I would hear this year. I was not disappointed, for La vostra ansia di orizzonte (‘Your anxiety of horizon’) is not only adventurous, but it shimmers with an otherworldly, almost folksy beauty.

The album came together after Stefano was sent some files in 2015 by guitarist Salvo Lazzara, known for his work with progressive rock band Germinale, and more recently as solo project Penserio Nomade, with the attached request for Stefano to work on his new album. The files were much different to what Salvo was doing as Penserio Nomade, covering all bases from ambient, to psychedelic, and free form noise. That might not sound too appealing but what the pair have conjured from that basest of material is the end result of musical alchemy writ large.

Opening track L’alba di una rosa features introspective untreated 12-string electric guitar backed by what could be recorded rainfall, that devolves into a simulation of the random scratches on a vinyl record, it soon becomes apparent that the found sounds and electronic manipulations are as important as the traditional instrumentation on this singular but fascinating album. I particularly liked the treated cat’s purr during Ma tu dov’eri? …or is it an idling motorbike engine? This tactic of sounds just beyond definition assists the listener’s imagination as it creates abstract paintings in the mind’s eye. Another sequence during this long piece that ends the album sees Salvo’s guitar doing a more than passable Miles homage, with harmonics and melodies flying up and down the fretboard, in call and response to Marco Fagioli’s trombone. Some really fine trumpet work from Luca Pietropaoli over all manner of odd watery percussive noises and more unidentified flying found objects dominate the larger proportion of the mid-section of the piece before Salvo’s guitar scratches plaintively at the back door, a cat crying to be let in. Eventually it gets on that motorbike and rides off into the sunrise.

[embedded content]

Possibly the most engaging section of this album is Dune d’acqua I & II (see video above), the first part just Stefano’s heartfelt voice accompanied by his ukulele, the tune then expanding with the incoming tide in part II. Quite lovely.

Elsewhere we a have a touch of Faust-like piano experimentation, ambient soundscapes, abstract scientific description sung as a ballad by the elfin-like Lucia Pera, and the title track eventually works a conventional electronic rhythm out of sampled and looped pigeon cooing, something that admittedly looks odd on written down, but works well, trust me!

The subtly tasteful tri-fold out CD cover contains a booklet (remember those?) that offers translations of all the track titles and credits for each track, in addition to the text in the original Italian. This is particularly useful where Onde di terra is concerned, consisting as it does of Stefano’s thoughtful and poetic lyric recited rather than sung, to the backing of plaintive banjo and soulful harmonica. Avant-blues, if you will!

This is experimental music that goes well beyond being wilfully odd to create a genuinely engaging soundscape that achieves its goal of agitating the grey matter beyond mere passive acceptance. If you have an adventurous musical spirit, you need to hear this.

TRACK LISTING
01. L’alba di una rosa (2:18)
02. Onde di terra (7:25)
03. Rosalba (2:06)
04. Celeste laguna (4:49)
05. La vostra ansia di orizzonte (5:25)
06. L’aria d’oro (4:31)
07. Dune d’acqua I (1:44)
08. Dune d’acqua II (3:48)
09. Ma tu dov’eri? (21:01)

Total Time – 53:09

MUSICIANS
Salvo Lazzara – Guitars, Chivola, Loops, Bass Guitar, Found Objects, Didgeridoo
Stefano Giannotti – Voice, Tapes, Violin, Ukulele, Bowed Banjo, Harmonica, Handbells, Upward Piano
Luca Pietropaoli – Trumpet, Live Electronics
Marco Fagioli – Trombone
Lucia Pera – Voice

ADDITIONAL INFO
Record Label: Ma.Ra.Cash Records
Catalogue#: MRC064
Year f Release: 2017

LINKS
Stefano Giannotti – Website | Facebook

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Edition 113 of Sounds That Can Be Made is now available as a podcast!

Playlist:

Von Hertzen Brothers – The Arsonist (from War is Over)
The D/A Method – A Night in September (from The Desert Road)
Bjørn Riis – Where Are You Now (from Forever Comes to an End)
Damanek – The Cosmic Score (from On Track)
Threshold – Swallowed (from Legends of the Shires)

Connect 4:
Steve Hackett – West to East (from The Night Siren)
Orphaned Land – New Jerusalem (from The Never Ending Way Of ORwarriOR)
Anathema – Angels Walk Among Us (from We’re Here Because We’re Here)
H.I.M.- The Funeral of Hearts (from Love Metal)

Alcest – Délivrance (from Shelter)
Opeth – Atonement (from Ghost Reveries)
Big Big Train – Wind Distorted Pioneers (from Goodbye to the Age of Steam)

Jurassic Prog:
King Crimson – Moonchild (including The Dream and The Illusion) (from In The Court Of The Crimson King)
Pink Floyd – Set The Controls For The Heart Of The Sun (from A Saucerful of Secrets)

Gandalf’s Fist – The First Lamplighter (Memories of Nuclear Snow) (from The First Lamplighter (Memories of Nuclear Snow))
The Gift – Sweeper Of Dreams (from Why The Sea is Salt)

Monsters of Progzilla:


Prefab Sprout – When Love Breaks Down (live)
It Bites – Kiss Like Judas (live)
The Blue Nile – Tinseltown in the Rain (live)
The Waterboys – Whole of the Moon (live)
Van Der Graaf Generator – A Plague Of Lighthouse Keepers/Sleepwalkers (live)
Genesis – The Return of the Giant Hogweed (live)

Green Day – Wake Me Up When September Ends (from American Idiot)

Proving that prog isn't just for dinosaurs!
I’m delighted to announce that the podcast for edition 215 of Live From Progzilla Towers is now available.

In this edition we heard the following music:

  1. Lifesigns – N
  2. Trojka – Til Neste Farvel
  3. Izz – Swallow Our Pride
  4. Brian Eno – Mother Whale Eyeless
  5. The Galactic Cowboy Orchestra – Swara Kakali
  6. Accordo Dei Contrari – Eros Vs Anteros
  7. Geof Whitely Project – The Blessed And The Damned
  8. Twelfth Night – East Of Eden
  9. Dave Kerzner – Static
  10. Mark King – The Essential
  11. Cocteau Twins – Pearly-Dewdrops’ Drops (12″ Version)
  12. Philip Glass – Etoile Polaire
  13. Phew – Signal
  14. Phew – New World
  15. Beatrix Players – Lady Of The Lake
  16. Gizmodrome – Zombies In The Mall
  17. Trojan Horse – The Modern Apothecary
  18. Big Big Train – The Passing Widow
  19. Philip Glass – Koyaanisqatsi

iTunes/iPod users*: Just search for ‘Progzilla’ or subscribe to: http://podcasts.progzilla.com/cliff/podcast.xml

Enjoy!

Edition 102 of Steve Blease’s Heavy Elements is now available as a podcast.

Playlist:

Godsticks – Below the Belt
Arcane – The Seer
sleepmakeswaves – tundra
John Carpenter – In the Mouth of Madness
Retrospective – The End of Their World

Live at 11: Pain Of Salvation
Scarsick (live)
Hallelujah (live)
Ashes (live)

Between The Buried & Me – Prequel to the Sequel
Alek Darson – The Rind
Earthside – Crater

Album of the Week: Rishloo – Terras Fames
Blitz
Narcissist Code
The Water Is Fine

Orphaned Land – Ocean Land (The Revelation)

This news story was originally published here: http://theprogressiveaspect.net/blog/2017/09/27/mystery-second-home/

I was lucky enough to see Mystery at The Borderline in London in September 2014. The tour was in support of their fifth studio album The World is a Game; Benoît David had left in March, to be replaced by Jean Pageau and the band had begun writing Delusion Rain which they released in November 2015. Support that night was provided by the excellent DeeExpus who performed an engaging, frenetic and hugely impressive set which was more than worthy of being a headline act in its own right.

However, when Mystery took to the stage, the transformation in atmosphere was remarkable. There was a calm assuredness accompanied by a confident, statesmanlike poise and presence. The music was electric, fresh, edgy and exuding a polished, elegant power and excitingly bold energy which was enthralling as well as scintillating. It was a commanding performance, occasionally a little rough around the edges, which left little doubt that here was a band who were having fun, who fundamentally believed in the quality of the music they were creating and who shared a common vision for the directions in which they wanted to go next.

Fast forward two years and Mystery take to the stage again at the ProgDreams V Festival in the Boerderij Cultuurpodium, Zoetermeer, Netherlands. Second Home is the engrossing and thoroughly riveting live recording of the set performed that night and hearing it quickly takes me back once more to that happy night at The Borderline. The crisp and detailed production captures with a sparkling clarity the thrilling musicianship and passionate creativity which pulses and shines so brightly from start to finish.

Mystery are a band who are clearly still having fun. What this release demonstrates, beyond the shadow of a doubt, is their star continues to ascend – rightfully so – built on a spirited yet relaxed style which digs deep and allows their music to flow with a natural expression and instinctive momentum. The music is persuasive, compelling and dynamic, the soundstage immediate, arresting, enticingly dramatic. There is now a much greater sense of conviction which delivers an irresistible performance which is as accomplished as it is rousing.

Although largely built around the excellent Delusion Rain, the set-list provides a fascinating and intriguing insight into a back catalogue which reaches across 21 years and encompasses six studio albums. Songs are thoughtfully selected from just about all of them to form an imaginative programme full of pace and presence, whilst showcasing the staggering diversity of a band who are equally at home playing extended ballads lasting in excess of 10 minutes or shorter, more succinct songs which weave elegant stories and narrative moments.

Exuberant, foot-stomping rock and roll rhythms stand shoulder to shoulder with songs that are emotionally charged and delicately subtle, the music exposing a technical virtuosity and exuding a skilful panache. At its heart is the gradually developing relationship and growing understanding between the vocal prowess of Pageau and the consummate artistry of Michel St-Père on guitar. The success of the set trades off the often mesmerising interplay between them, Pageau a superb lead and St-Père the perfect foil.

But they are only enabled to do this by virtue of the happily inventive playing by the other members of the band who create the platform and form the cradle which allow it to happen. Jean-Sébastien Goyette’s drumming and François Fournier’s bass work form a discerning and provocative partnership that allows the keys of Benoît Dupuis and the interjections of Sylvain Moineau to weave innovative threads that embrace the soundstage and create the tipping point in balancing the contribution of the others. It’s a magical formula which the band grasp and accept throughout the concert.

Fans of Mystery will find Second Home a welcome revelation, particularly when compared with Live from the Netherlands, released in 2014. The band have come a long way, literally as well as metaphorically. This is a wonderful recording of a great night which demonstrates the increasing creative excellence of a band who are taking massive musical strides forward and who have the confidence to pursue the vision they hold for where they want to be. I wish I had been there, but alas I was not: for now this recording will continue to whet my appetite until the next time they tour in the U.K. again.

[embedded content]

[Mystery are scheduled to play the Winter’s End Festival in Chepstow next April.]

TRACK LISTING
CD 1

01. Delusion Rain (10:23)
02. Travel to the Night (10:21)
03. If You See Her (5:55)
04. Another Day (18:24)
05. Wall Street King (6:35)
06. Pride (8:19)
07. The Last Glass of Wine (6:46)

CD 2
08. Shadow of the Lake (6:30)
09. Dear Someone (12:42)
10. Through Different Eyes (22:17)
11. The Preacher’s Fall (4:05)
~ Bonus tracks (CD only)
12. Superstar (8:52)
13. Till the Truth Comes Out (8:59)
14. The Sailor and the Mermaid (5:26)

[All recorded live at ProgDreams V Festival – Boerderij Cultuurpodium, Zoetermmer [NL] on 3rd April 2016.]

Total Time – 143:05

MUSICIANS
Benoît Dupuis – Keyboards
François Fournier – Bass
Jean-Sébastien Goyette – Drums
Sylvain Moineau – Guitar
Jean Pageau – Vocals
Michel St-Père – Guitar

ADDITIONAL INFO
Record Label: Unicorn Digital
Catalogue#: DVD: UNCDVD-005 | CD: UNCR-5115
Country of Origin: Canada
Date of Releases: DVD – 01/08/2017 | CD – 01/09/2017

LINKS
Mystery – Website | Facebook | Twitter | Youtube | Soundcloud

Tags:



This news story was originally published here: https://www.prog-sphere.com/interviews/sonus-corona-interview/
Sonus Corona

Finnish progressive metal band Sonus Corona has released their new single “The Refuge” earlier this year, accompanied with a music video directed by Victor Ekholm. The sextet hailing from Turku “strives to mix soft melodies with heavy riffs in a progressive style.” Guitarist Ari Lempinen spoke for Prog Sphere about the band’s beginnings, the new single, and more.

Define the mission of Sonus Corona.

We are all about creating inspiring music. We want to challenge the listener both musically and lyricwise.

How did you go about forming the band? Why “Sonus Corona” as a name?

The band started out in 2011 as a side project between myself and Rasmus, our drummer. We initially just wanted to jam and have fun but as we played together, we came to an understanding to form a band. Aki, our bass player joined shortly after and we played as a trio for about a year. Harri our lead guitarist joined next to fill the void we felt we had in our solo and lead section. A big change was imminent when I felt I wanted to concentrate only to playing and we started our search for a new vocalist. In 2014 Timo became our new frontman and we felt that our crew was complete.

When selecting a name for the band, we wanted something that sounded different and would somehow give the idea of a refined sound. After some brainstorming Sonus Corona came up and instantly felt good. The name is latin with sonus meaning sound and corona meaning crown. So freely translated it could be Sound Crown. We released our debut album Sonus Corona the following year.

In 2016, while composing new material, I really wanted to expand the sound further with keys. I asked my brother Esa to play the keys on our single “The Refuge” and after playing with us live we asked if he would like to join the band. He said yes and thus we became a sextet.

[embedded content]

Tell me about the musical concept behind your new single “The Refuge.”

With all the negative things going on in the world right now the idea behind “The Refuge” was to create a song with a clear positive vibe and an encouraging feel to it. The song introduces keys to our music which do expand the musical palette quite a bit. We also switched from six to seven string guitars. That is a big change when composing. Even so, the basic composition in “The Refuge” is not that different from before.

Lead me through the creative process that informed “The Refuge.”

As the idea was to give the listener a positive feel, we worked on riffs that you could easily compose melodies in a major scale to. I personally like lydian scale which is very close to a major scale but has that mysterious magical feel to it. When we started jamming and forging the riffs we ended up with a pretty straightforward structure which felt solid. The lyrics are written by Timo and myself and they insinuate a different mindset where you can find Refuge even amidst chaos.

Where does “The Refuge” stand comparing with your self-titled release?

The song has new elements and a new drive to it without being completely different. Our new material features keys in an increasingly bigger role and in general is a bit more technical than before. This track probably stands out as being most “pop”. Soundwise it is very different than the album before. “The Refuge” was recorded, mixed and mastered by professionals while we did almost everything ourselves with the debut album.

What were the biggest challenges you faced when working on the single?

The time we spent rehearsing and recording the single was significantly less than with our previous release. This created some issues trying to fit the schedules of six full time working people together. Everything else went smoothly.

Have you managed to make any new discoveries as the time passed during the creative process? Do you think that at some point of that process your writing approach changed drastically?

When I switched to a seven string guitar I had to adjust my playing quite a bit. Before the switch I played a six string guitar with a drop D tuning and now a standard seven. This involved some exciting discoveries. I don’t think the writing process itself was exceptionally different than it used to be.

What have you been listening during the songwriting process of “The Refuge”, and in which measure it shaped the song’s final structure?

Can’t really mention anything specific. New interesting bands arise all the time but it is hard to evaluate if/how they have influenced my writing.

Sonus Corona - The Refuge

What types of change this music can initiate, in your opinion?

Well we strive to create inspiring music. We channel the ideas for our lyrics mainly from our own experiences in life and we try to deliver the message with music that supports and complements the message. If our music does initiate a change in the listener I hope it is a positive one.

Where do you draw the inspiration from and how do you go about channeling it into writing?

The beauty, brutality and the fragility of life is a huge inspiration for me. I try to implement the same elements into my compositions.

What non-musical entities and ideas have an impact on your music?

We do think protecting the planet is pretty important and treating each other with respect.

What is your viewpoint on the struggle bands are facing today as they try to monetize their output?

The supply of good quality music has reached gigantic proportions and the biggest challenge is simply to get heard. Not just online, but to have their music played radios etc. YouTube is stuffed with videos that gather little attention. Sadly if you have big boobs and a pretty face it helps. None of us happen to have either. I believe the core idea is to create quality content and be consistent.

What does the future hold for Sonus Corona?

We are currently producing new material and hope to release more new music soon!

“The Refuge” is available now from CD Baby, iTunes, Spotify and Google Play. Follow Sonus Corona on Facebook for all future updates.

This news story was originally published here: http://www.prog-sphere.com/interviews/sonus-corona-interview/
Sonus Corona

Finnish progressive metal band Sonus Corona has released their new single “The Refuge” earlier this year, accompanied with a music video directed by Victor Ekholm. The sextet hailing from Turku “strives to mix soft melodies with heavy riffs in a progressive style.” Guitarist Ari Lempinen spoke for Prog Sphere about the band’s beginnings, the new single, and more.

Define the mission of Sonus Corona.

We are all about creating inspiring music. We want to challenge the listener both musically and lyricwise.

How did you go about forming the band? Why “Sonus Corona” as a name?

The band started out in 2011 as a side project between myself and Rasmus, our drummer. We initially just wanted to jam and have fun but as we played together, we came to an understanding to form a band. Aki, our bass player joined shortly after and we played as a trio for about a year. Harri our lead guitarist joined next to fill the void we felt we had in our solo and lead section. A big change was imminent when I felt I wanted to concentrate only to playing and we started our search for a new vocalist. In 2014 Timo became our new frontman and we felt that our crew was complete.

When selecting a name for the band, we wanted something that sounded different and would somehow give the idea of a refined sound. After some brainstorming Sonus Corona came up and instantly felt good. The name is latin with sonus meaning sound and corona meaning crown. So freely translated it could be Sound Crown. We released our debut album Sonus Corona the following year.

In 2016, while composing new material, I really wanted to expand the sound further with keys. I asked my brother Esa to play the keys on our single “The Refuge” and after playing with us live we asked if he would like to join the band. He said yes and thus we became a sextet.

[embedded content]

Tell me about the musical concept behind your new single “The Refuge.”

With all the negative things going on in the world right now the idea behind “The Refuge” was to create a song with a clear positive vibe and an encouraging feel to it. The song introduces keys to our music which do expand the musical palette quite a bit. We also switched from six to seven string guitars. That is a big change when composing. Even so, the basic composition in “The Refuge” is not that different from before.

Lead me through the creative process that informed “The Refuge.”

As the idea was to give the listener a positive feel, we worked on riffs that you could easily compose melodies in a major scale to. I personally like lydian scale which is very close to a major scale but has that mysterious magical feel to it. When we started jamming and forging the riffs we ended up with a pretty straightforward structure which felt solid. The lyrics are written by Timo and myself and they insinuate a different mindset where you can find Refuge even amidst chaos.

Where does “The Refuge” stand comparing with your self-titled release?

The song has new elements and a new drive to it without being completely different. Our new material features keys in an increasingly bigger role and in general is a bit more technical than before. This track probably stands out as being most “pop”. Soundwise it is very different than the album before. “The Refuge” was recorded, mixed and mastered by professionals while we did almost everything ourselves with the debut album.

What were the biggest challenges you faced when working on the single?

The time we spent rehearsing and recording the single was significantly less than with our previous release. This created some issues trying to fit the schedules of six full time working people together. Everything else went smoothly.

Have you managed to make any new discoveries as the time passed during the creative process? Do you think that at some point of that process your writing approach changed drastically?

When I switched to a seven string guitar I had to adjust my playing quite a bit. Before the switch I played a six string guitar with a drop D tuning and now a standard seven. This involved some exciting discoveries. I don’t think the writing process itself was exceptionally different than it used to be.

What have you been listening during the songwriting process of “The Refuge”, and in which measure it shaped the song’s final structure?

Can’t really mention anything specific. New interesting bands arise all the time but it is hard to evaluate if/how they have influenced my writing.

Sonus Corona - The Refuge

What types of change this music can initiate, in your opinion?

Well we strive to create inspiring music. We channel the ideas for our lyrics mainly from our own experiences in life and we try to deliver the message with music that supports and complements the message. If our music does initiate a change in the listener I hope it is a positive one.

Where do you draw the inspiration from and how do you go about channeling it into writing?

The beauty, brutality and the fragility of life is a huge inspiration for me. I try to implement the same elements into my compositions.

What non-musical entities and ideas have an impact on your music?

We do think protecting the planet is pretty important and treating each other with respect.

What is your viewpoint on the struggle bands are facing today as they try to monetize their output?

The supply of good quality music has reached gigantic proportions and the biggest challenge is simply to get heard. Not just online, but to have their music played radios etc. YouTube is stuffed with videos that gather little attention. Sadly if you have big boobs and a pretty face it helps. None of us happen to have either. I believe the core idea is to create quality content and be consistent.

What does the future hold for Sonus Corona?

We are currently producing new material and hope to release more new music soon!

“The Refugee” is available now from CD Baby, iTunes, Spotify and Google Play. Follow Sonus Corona on Facebook for all future updates.

Styx – Red Storm

Angel – Tower

Discipline – The Body Yearns

Steely Dan – Deacon Blues

Plastic Overlords – A Moment Of silence For Unsynchronized Watches

Primus – The Seven

Fright Pig – Darkest of Forms

Machines Dream – Airfield on Sunwick

Sparks – Hippopotamus

Johnny Unicorn – Invisible Sasquatch

Johnny Unicorn – Commanders Of The Kings Of The Earth

Queens of the Stone Age – The Evil Has Landed

Man On fire – Teargas

3rdegree – That Time Of The Night

Bent Knee – Land Animal

Cirkus -Wild Dogs

Grizzly Bear – Neighbours

Sproingg- Alligator Peak

Cirrus Bay – The Exposure Of Truth

 

This news story was originally published here: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/ProgNewsProgarchives/~3/2Xa4OYUkkJE/forum_posts.asp

Hello pop pickers!

As we have released our new pop song today, it would seem a good plan to mention it here. We have made sure you can’t hear any of the fab progy/jazzy/masterpiecey songs yet tho’.

The lineup announced for the album is as good as it gets IMHO:

Peter Jones (Tiger Moth Tales, Camel, Red Bazar) – vocals

Joey Lugassy (2 time Emmy nominee & BunChakeze) – Vocals

Joe Vitale (Joe Walsh, Barnstorm, CSN) – Drums & Percussion

Gordo Bennett (GorMusik) – All orchestral instruments

Petri Lemmy Lindström (Corvus Stone, Progeland) – Bass Guitar

Colin Tench – Guitars, Piano, Backing Voices

We even did a funny video recently.

[embedded content]

This news story was originally published here: http://theprogressiveaspect.net/blog/2017/09/26/richard-wileman-ghost-ep/

From the start, the delicate guitar intro to The Veil shows a more gentle and introverted side of Karda Estra mainman Richard Wileman in his first, nominally at least, solo venture. Elements of the more elaborate Karda Estra sound, including Amy Fry’s enigmatic clarinet, add depth and variety to the music, but there is a very different feel to this release.

The pieces are all brief – too brief in fact, giving merely a snapshot of what Richard might have up his sleeve for a full scale solo work – the second being a venture into singer/songwriter territory with a beguiling song which is delivered beautifully, Richard’s easygoing voice adding just the right amount of world-weariness.

[embedded content]

So, the question is, as Karda Estra is Richard’s project and he can take it in whichever direction he wishes, why does he need to release under his own name? Richard explains this as, “… kind of what follows KE now. I still obviously have interest in instrumental music, but I’m enjoying songwriting again too… I have a few new songs either written and/or recorded and sung them live informally. So both a bit of a change but not completely giving up on KE elements I still enjoy.” As such, Ghost sits comfortably alongside the Karda Estra discography, and we’ll have to wait and see whether Richard’s solo work breaks away in a direction entirely distinct from KE.

Ensuring continuity with his main body of work, the final two tracks are reworkings of themes from previous Karda Estra pieces. Andromeda Variations for Guitar follows on very nicely from Ghost and revisits Andromeda Approaches from The Seas and the Stars in a vibrant solo guitar version filled with the mystery of the original. Finally, Chaos Theme for Clarinet, Amy returning for the melody line, in what is as expected a clarinet re-imagining of a track which originally sountracked the end titles to the film Chaos in 2000, previously appearing on the Alternate History and Land of Ghosts compilations. It’s a choice pick of an obscure piece that deserves wider hearing, slinky clarinet replacing oboe in a stripped down version that sounds much more contemporary than the original.

As to potential future developments, “Small steps… I don’t have much free time, but doing bits and bobs”. We’ll just have to wait and see where Richard’s muse takes him next but as a brief peek into his current thought processes the immaculately presented Ghost EP is as intriguing as any of his work, although the brevity of the running time leaves you wanting more.

TRACK LISTING
01. The Veil (2:14)
02. Ghost (3:34)
03. Andromeda Variations for Guitar (1:56)
04. Chaos Theme for Clarinet (3:32)

Total time – 11:16

MUSICIANS
Written, Performed and Produced by Richard Wileman
~ With:
Amy Fry – Clarinet (tracks 1 & 4)

ADDITIONAL INFO
Record Label: No Image Records
Catalogue#: NIDL21
Date of Release: 31st August 2017

LINKS
Richard Wileman – Website | Facebook | Bandcamp

Tags: