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All posts for the month March, 2017

PW 413

If you missed this week’s Prog-Watch you can still listen HERE

My special guest this week is the fascinating German artist Thomas Thielen, also known simply as “t”. Tune in to hear epic Prog Rock from his three latest albums, and some of a very deep and interesting conversation I had with Thomas a few weeks ago. Before I dig into it with Thomas, however, I get things rolling with a new track from the great new White Willow album!

Proving that prog isn't just for dinosaurs!
I’m delighted to announce that the podcast for edition 189 of Live From Progzilla Towers is now available.

In this edition we heard the following music:

  1. Elton John – Funeral For A Friend + Love Lies Bleeding
  2. Nova Collective – Dancing Machines
  3. Tusmorke – Vinterblot
  4. Pete Sinfield – The Night People
  5. Djam Karet – Saul Says So
  6. The Physics House Band – Calypso
  7. Anthony Phillips – Compression
  8. Mike Rutherford – Out Into The Daylight
  9. Magenta – Children Of The Sun
  10. The Creatures – Miss The Girl
  11. Landmarq – Forever Young
  12. Chicago – Ballet for a Girl in Buchannon (Steven Wilson Remix)
  13. JPL – Convoléances
  14. Chickn – Shifting Time Blues / Akhedia
  15. John Wetton & Geoff Downes – Paradox – Let Me Go
  16. Alan Parsons Project – Time

iTunes/iPod users*: Just search for ‘Progzilla’ or subscribe to: http://podcasts.progzilla.com/cliff/podcast.xml

Enjoy!

This news story was originally published here: https://www.prog-sphere.com/specials/john-petrucci-new-solo-album/
JOHN PETRUCCI on Learning Guitar without Tabs and YouTube

Metal Wani recently talked with Dream Theater‘s guitarist John Petrucci. You can hear a full interview below.

Asked about if he plans to record a new solo album, a follow-up to 2005′s Suspended Animation, Petrucci answered: “Yeah, definitely. I did ‘Suspended Animation’ back in 2005, I believe. It’s been so long since I’ve done one. And it’s probably the number one question I get asked personally, whether I’m [gonna release another] solo album. And the answer is yes, it’s just a matter of finding the time. I know that sounds like a lame excuse. I actually have the music written. I’ve actually played a few of the songs on the ‘G3′ tour I did a few years ago in South America with Joe Satriani and Steve Morse. It’s a matter of me stepping away from the schedule of Dream Theater and getting into the studio and recording the songs. So it’s definitely going to happen.

[embedded content]

[embedded content]

(source Blabbermouth)

This news story was originally published here: http://www.prog-sphere.com/specials/john-petrucci-new-solo-album/
JOHN PETRUCCI on Learning Guitar without Tabs and YouTube

Metal Wani recently talked with Dream Theater‘s guitarist John Petrucci. You can hear a full interview below.

Asked about if he plans to record a new solo album, a follow-up to 2005′s Suspended Animation, Petrucci answered: “Yeah, definitely. I did ‘Suspended Animation’ back in 2005, I believe. It’s been so long since I’ve done one. And it’s probably the number one question I get asked personally, whether I’m [gonna release another] solo album. And the answer is yes, it’s just a matter of finding the time. I know that sounds like a lame excuse. I actually have the music written. I’ve actually played a few of the songs on the ‘G3′ tour I did a few years ago in South America with Joe Satriani and Steve Morse. It’s a matter of me stepping away from the schedule of Dream Theater and getting into the studio and recording the songs. So it’s definitely going to happen.

[embedded content]

[embedded content]

(source Blabbermouth)

This news story was originally published here: https://www.prog-sphere.com/interviews/event-horizon-interview/
Event Horizon

Los Angeles-based Event Horizon was founded by guitarist Max Sindermann with the mission to “bridge the gap between classical guitar and modern death metal.” In 2013 Event Horizon put out a debut EP ‘The Emancipation of Dissonance,’ and back in February this year the band released their sophomore EP release ‘A Nightmare of Symmetry.’

Event Horizon is one of the bands in Prog Sphere Android app’s playlist for March 2017. You can download the app and vote for their song “The Light That Carries Me.” In the interview below, Sindermann tells us about the writing and recording processes of the new EP, its message, and more.

Tell me about the creative process that informed your second EP A Nightmare of Symmetry, released in February, and the themes it captures.

I started developing my creative musical approach when I was 19-20 years old. I was in a local death metal band here in LA called Norazzah. We had been getting some positive feedback in the local scene, but eventually things fell apart due to personal and financial reasons. I didn’t really have the self-confidence at the time to think I was capable of writing solid progressive music. I was in music school at the time and doing a lot of theory homework. I got this idea to try and take the classical approach of creating harmonic structure within music and using that in a metal context. The first song I wrote was “A Lapse of Sanity,” which was on our first EP, The Emancipation of Dissonance. The whole thing just exploded from there. I started writing more music while taking this approach, and eventually my classical guitar playing started taking a front-row seat, to the point where I had to stop playing with a pick entirely.

A Nightmare of Symmetry is a further exploration on that compositional approach. I was really trying to push the bounds of where I could go, and I also wanted to show that even with the strong classical influence, the music could still be really heavy and punishing. I wanted this to be a pure expression of my love for all these different styles of music, and I think as a full band, we were really able to accomplish that.

What is the message you are trying to give with A Nightmare of Symmetry?

I’m not sure where the message really lies in our music. Much of the music I write is very personal. More often than not, I take an approach that’s pretty introspective. Lyrically speaking, I’m usually dealing with subjects like mental illness, existentialism, fear of the unknown, etc. Musically speaking, I’m always about creating something that stirs deep emotions within the listener. I guess that’s what the message is all about in the end, reaching out to my audience and handing over a piece of myself to them. Sometimes all you need your music to do is create a small bond with a stranger you might never meet.

A Nightmare of Symmetry

How did you document the music while it was being formulated?

I’m definitely a pen-and-paper kind of dude when it comes to writing music. Since the music is all grounded in complex harmonic structures, I always need to see it all laid out in front of me. I don’t really like recording riffs or jamming it out. I need to have it in the form of blueprints in front of me, where I’m able to see all the moving parts within the music.

Is the dynamic flow of the pieces carefully architected?

I like to think of my approach to writing music as a storytelling process. The music is all about taking the listener on a rollercoaster ride of different emotions. So in that sense, the dynamic flow has to be carefully articulated in order to make that process work. I spend a lot of time making sure the music is carefully transitioning so that the listener is being guided through the experience. I think sometimes prog bands get a little out of hand and let the music become a sporadic mix of jumbled-up parts. I look at Event Horizon songs as having an exposition, development, climax, and resolution. Those all need to be firmly connected together in order for the piece to work as a whole.

Describe the approach to recording the EP.

We had a pretty simple approach. I handled the guitars, bass, and vocals much like the first EP, right out of my apartment. The difference this time was everyone got to contribute. Jacob wrote some amazing drum parts that almost sound like Neil Peart meets death metal. Vincent Medina, our bass player, got to lay down his own tracks, as well as a few bass leads. There’s an excellent improvised bass solo at the end of “First World Phenomenon” which is a great display of his virtuosic abilities. Our other guitarist, David Cortes, handled all the orchestrations on the intro track “Asymmetrical.” David’s background in classical composition really helped set the mood for the whole EP. The big difference in our recording process this time was around is that we were now functioning like a full unit, and not just a solo project. It really feels like a complete product this time around.

Max SindermannHow long A Nightmare of Symmetry was in the making?

Actually quite a while! I started working on the songs shortly after I released The Emancipation of Dissonance in 2013. At the time it was all just a bedroom project. I had been handling all the compositions and instrumentals myself, and then working with a Belgian-based vocalist named Brandon Polaris. He did an excellent job on the first EP, and had this really booming, powerful voice. When I started working on new music, it became hard for us to coordinate it. For a while it felt like it was never going to happen.

Fast forward a bit, I’m hanging out at a dive bar in K-town wearing a Dying Fetus shirt. I get approached by a drummer who wants to jam. I had nearly given up on getting new music released at that point, and I met so many flakey musicians that I didn’t expect much to come of it. Next thing I know, I’m getting hit up constantly to get into a rehearsal room and play some music. And of course, that ended up being our drummer, Jacob Alves. He really helped push things forward. We started putting together a live band, and with everyone’s input and hard work, we were finally able to get new music rolling out.

Which bands or artists influenced your work on the release?

On the metal side, I can say my two biggest influences have been Opeth and Cynic. There’s a lot more than that obviously, but those two really inspired me to get into creative progressive music. Each of them has such a unique approach to metal, and they each use different sounds and flavors to create something unique, not to mention how deeply emotional and layered their music can be. A lot of my other influences though come from the classical side. I’m really into Romantic and Twentieth Century era composers like Rachmaninoff, Stravinsky, Debussy, Tarrega, etc. Those are the composers that had a lasting impact on me, and really helped me to shape the sound for Event Horizon.

What is your view on technology in music?

Ha, that’s never an easy question to answer. I think when we start talking about the merits of the analog versus digital ages, the conversation gets really convoluted. Since a lot of our music is rooted on metal and classical music, most people would probably assume we’re grounded firmly in an analog approach to our creative process. But personally, I don’t fear technology at all. In fact, I love it. I think people have this big fear of new technologies coming in and stepping over everything, when that’s not totally a grounded way of thinking. I oftentimes joke that when the remote control was invented, there were a bunch of old people sitting around going, “I hate these new fangled television remotes, I really just like the feeling of getting out of my comfortable chair and feeling those knobs between my fingers!

I guess it’s a touchy subject in the music world because technology really grants people without the talent or skill the ability to come in and create. I can see the fear in that. When technology makes things easier, there’s less incentive to want to learn or put in the time to become good at something. But on the flip-side of that, there’s opportunities for skilled, talented people to use that technology to their advantage and create things that are wholly new. Not to mention technology gives artists like us the ability to record and distribute our music without the need of expensive equipment and a fancy studio.

I think as the world changes, there’s valuable relics from the past that can get lost if we aren’t willing to preserve them. However, sometimes there’s things that don’t serve a purpose anymore that we need to learn to let go of. It’s hard to tell which is which sometimes. The world is changing so fast for us that we’re all so overwhelmed with it to really figure it out. We have to strike a balance in there somewhere. I think as long as there’s passionate, dedicated musicians who genuinely care about their craft, we’ll end up being fine in the end of the day.

[embedded content]

Do you see your music as serving a purpose beyond music?

I think all art really serves a similar purpose, and that’s trying to communicate to the audience. It doesn’t matter what you’re trying to communicate, it could be a thought, feeling, joke, idea, or whatever it is you want to get across. It’s kind of easy in prog to sort of nerd out and make it all about making the music more complex. But sometimes if you do that you forget the real purpose at the center of it all, which is to make a connection with the audience. So I guess I feel like music should always really be serving a purpose beyond just being music.

What are your plans for the future?

Right now our plan is to keep putting ourselves out here and hopefully put out more music. Our plans aren’t full concrete yet. We’ve definitely learned through our experiences that life throws a lot of curveballs and we make a lot of mistakes we need to learn from as we push forward, but we always have plans to keep creating. Personally, I am really into the idea of going back to The Emancipation of Dissonance and re-recording it from scratch. I feel like things have changed so much since I pulled that little EP together in my bedroom, and taking another stab at it with a full band could really show how the whole group has evolved. Whatever we end up doing next though, I have high hopes for it!

A Nightmare of Symmetry is available now from Bandcamp. Check Event Horizon’s official website for more info, and follow them on Facebook and Twitter.

This news story was originally published here: http://www.prog-sphere.com/interviews/event-horizon-interview/
Event Horizon

Los Angeles-based Event Horizon was founded by guitarist Max Sindermann with the mission to “bridge the gap between classical guitar and modern death metal.” In 2013 Event Horizon put out a debut EP ‘The Emancipation of Dissonance,’ and back in February this year the band released their sophomore EP release ‘A Nightmare of Symmetry.’

Event Horizon is one of the bands in Prog Sphere Android app’s playlist for March 2017. You can download the app and vote for their song “The Light That Carries Me.” In the interview below, Sindermann tells us about the writing and recording processes of the new EP, its message, and more.

Tell me about the creative process that informed your second EP A Nightmare of Symmetry, released in February, and the themes it captures.

I started developing my creative musical approach when I was 19-20 years old. I was in a local death metal band here in LA called Norazzah. We had been getting some positive feedback in the local scene, but eventually things fell apart due to personal and financial reasons. I didn’t really have the self-confidence at the time to think I was capable of writing solid progressive music. I was in music school at the time and doing a lot of theory homework. I got this idea to try and take the classical approach of creating harmonic structure within music and using that in a metal context. The first song I wrote was “A Lapse of Sanity,” which was on our first EP, The Emancipation of Dissonance. The whole thing just exploded from there. I started writing more music while taking this approach, and eventually my classical guitar playing started taking a front-row seat, to the point where I had to stop playing with a pick entirely.

A Nightmare of Symmetry is a further exploration on that compositional approach. I was really trying to push the bounds of where I could go, and I also wanted to show that even with the strong classical influence, the music could still be really heavy and punishing. I wanted this to be a pure expression of my love for all these different styles of music, and I think as a full band, we were really able to accomplish that.

What is the message you are trying to give with A Nightmare of Symmetry?

I’m not sure where the message really lies in our music. Much of the music I write is very personal. More often than not, I take an approach that’s pretty introspective. Lyrically speaking, I’m usually dealing with subjects like mental illness, existentialism, fear of the unknown, etc. Musically speaking, I’m always about creating something that stirs deep emotions within the listener. I guess that’s what the message is all about in the end, reaching out to my audience and handing over a piece of myself to them. Sometimes all you need your music to do is create a small bond with a stranger you might never meet.

A Nightmare of Symmetry

How did you document the music while it was being formulated?

I’m definitely a pen-and-paper kind of dude when it comes to writing music. Since the music is all grounded in complex harmonic structures, I always need to see it all laid out in front of me. I don’t really like recording riffs or jamming it out. I need to have it in the form of blueprints in front of me, where I’m able to see all the moving parts within the music.

Is the dynamic flow of the pieces carefully architected?

I like to think of my approach to writing music as a storytelling process. The music is all about taking the listener on a rollercoaster ride of different emotions. So in that sense, the dynamic flow has to be carefully articulated in order to make that process work. I spend a lot of time making sure the music is carefully transitioning so that the listener is being guided through the experience. I think sometimes prog bands get a little out of hand and let the music become a sporadic mix of jumbled-up parts. I look at Event Horizon songs as having an exposition, development, climax, and resolution. Those all need to be firmly connected together in order for the piece to work as a whole.

Describe the approach to recording the EP.

We had a pretty simple approach. I handled the guitars, bass, and vocals much like the first EP, right out of my apartment. The difference this time was everyone got to contribute. Jacob wrote some amazing drum parts that almost sound like Neil Peart meets death metal. Vincent Medina, our bass player, got to lay down his own tracks, as well as a few bass leads. There’s an excellent improvised bass solo at the end of “First World Phenomenon” which is a great display of his virtuosic abilities. Our other guitarist, David Cortes, handled all the orchestrations on the intro track “Asymmetrical.” David’s background in classical composition really helped set the mood for the whole EP. The big difference in our recording process this time was around is that we were now functioning like a full unit, and not just a solo project. It really feels like a complete product this time around.

Max SindermannHow long A Nightmare of Symmetry was in the making?

Actually quite a while! I started working on the songs shortly after I released The Emancipation of Dissonance in 2013. At the time it was all just a bedroom project. I had been handling all the compositions and instrumentals myself, and then working with a Belgian-based vocalist named Brandon Polaris. He did an excellent job on the first EP, and had this really booming, powerful voice. When I started working on new music, it became hard for us to coordinate it. For a while it felt like it was never going to happen.

Fast forward a bit, I’m hanging out at a dive bar in K-town wearing a Dying Fetus shirt. I get approached by a drummer who wants to jam. I had nearly given up on getting new music released at that point, and I met so many flakey musicians that I didn’t expect much to come of it. Next thing I know, I’m getting hit up constantly to get into a rehearsal room and play some music. And of course, that ended up being our drummer, Jacob Alves. He really helped push things forward. We started putting together a live band, and with everyone’s input and hard work, we were finally able to get new music rolling out.

Which bands or artists influenced your work on the release?

On the metal side, I can say my two biggest influences have been Opeth and Cynic. There’s a lot more than that obviously, but those two really inspired me to get into creative progressive music. Each of them has such a unique approach to metal, and they each use different sounds and flavors to create something unique, not to mention how deeply emotional and layered their music can be. A lot of my other influences though come from the classical side. I’m really into Romantic and Twentieth Century era composers like Rachmaninoff, Stravinsky, Debussy, Tarrega, etc. Those are the composers that had a lasting impact on me, and really helped me to shape the sound for Event Horizon.

What is your view on technology in music?

Ha, that’s never an easy question to answer. I think when we start talking about the merits of the analog versus digital ages, the conversation gets really convoluted. Since a lot of our music is rooted on metal and classical music, most people would probably assume we’re grounded firmly in an analog approach to our creative process. But personally, I don’t fear technology at all. In fact, I love it. I think people have this big fear of new technologies coming in and stepping over everything, when that’s not totally a grounded way of thinking. I oftentimes joke that when the remote control was invented, there were a bunch of old people sitting around going, “I hate these new fangled television remotes, I really just like the feeling of getting out of my comfortable chair and feeling those knobs between my fingers!

I guess it’s a touchy subject in the music world because technology really grants people without the talent or skill the ability to come in and create. I can see the fear in that. When technology makes things easier, there’s less incentive to want to learn or put in the time to become good at something. But on the flip-side of that, there’s opportunities for skilled, talented people to use that technology to their advantage and create things that are wholly new. Not to mention technology gives artists like us the ability to record and distribute our music without the need of expensive equipment and a fancy studio.

I think as the world changes, there’s valuable relics from the past that can get lost if we aren’t willing to preserve them. However, sometimes there’s things that don’t serve a purpose anymore that we need to learn to let go of. It’s hard to tell which is which sometimes. The world is changing so fast for us that we’re all so overwhelmed with it to really figure it out. We have to strike a balance in there somewhere. I think as long as there’s passionate, dedicated musicians who genuinely care about their craft, we’ll end up being fine in the end of the day.

[embedded content]

Do you see your music as serving a purpose beyond music?

I think all art really serves a similar purpose, and that’s trying to communicate to the audience. It doesn’t matter what you’re trying to communicate, it could be a thought, feeling, joke, idea, or whatever it is you want to get across. It’s kind of easy in prog to sort of nerd out and make it all about making the music more complex. But sometimes if you do that you forget the real purpose at the center of it all, which is to make a connection with the audience. So I guess I feel like music should always really be serving a purpose beyond just being music.

What are your plans for the future?

Right now our plan is to keep putting ourselves out here and hopefully put out more music. Our plans aren’t full concrete yet. We’ve definitely learned through our experiences that life throws a lot of curveballs and we make a lot of mistakes we need to learn from as we push forward, but we always have plans to keep creating. Personally, I am really into the idea of going back to The Emancipation of Dissonance and re-recording it from scratch. I feel like things have changed so much since I pulled that little EP together in my bedroom, and taking another stab at it with a full band could really show how the whole group has evolved. Whatever we end up doing next though, I have high hopes for it!

A Nightmare of Symmetry is available now from Bandcamp. Check Event Horizon’s official website for more info, and follow them on Facebook and Twitter.

This news story was originally published here: http://theprogressiveaspect.net/blog/2017/03/29/gordon-giltrap-paul-ward-the-last-of-england/

In what seems to have become a relentless, burgeoning and ever diversifying musical climate it is so easy to lose sight of what first attracted you, so with the release of The Last Of England the opportunity to reflect, rekindle and have a resting point to recharge the batteries came as a welcome tonic. This first release from Gordon Giltrap and Paul Ward has seldom been out of my listening rotation since it arrived a few weeks back. A stunning release, the beauty of which took me completely by surprise.

Backtracking to last year and I was delighted when I heard that Gordon Giltrap was to release a new studio album in 2017, one to be added to the collection without hesitation. So cards on the table – yes I am a huge fan of his music. Gordon is one artist who, regardless of what he turns his hand to, I can pretty much guarantee I will enjoy. A musician who has honed and perfected his own unique and instantly recognisable acoustic guitar style, which he so readily embeds within the melodic and captivating framework here.

The unknown quantity on The Last Of England was keyboard player and producer Paul Ward. I am sure that most will be unfamiliar with the name, including myself, as apart from a couple of now out of print studio releases in the early nineties, he has not followed a commercial career writing and performing his own music. The good news is, and I’m happy to report, his contributions to the album are inspired…

As alluded to above there is very little from Gordon Giltrap’s catalogue that has disappointed, although his last release with Oliver Wakeman, which was heralded as his return to the progressive fold, didn’t quite tick all the boxes. Ravens & Lullabies was very well received, however the inclusion of vocals from Paul Manzi and Benoît David and the more commercial AOR rock slant made the album a somewhat mixed bag for me, much preferring the instrumental pieces that sat in between the songs. Not a bad album per se and I mention Ravens & Lullabies purely as, once I had heard of the release of The Last Of England, I hoped that Gordon would return to the instrumental music he so excels at.

Delighted to say he has and the first seven pieces, falling under the sub heading The Brotherhood Suite, and which according to Gordon take their inspiration from the Pre-Raphaelite school of art, create an absorbing and moving suite. The title track opens proceedings and Paul Ward’s sumptuous orchestrations not only set the tone, but lay the foundation for Gordon’s wonderfully ornate and captivating guitar. Those familiar with Gordon’s work across the years will be mindful of similar collaborations where he has embellished his guitar with orchestrations, or even with a full blown orchestra, so kudos to Paul Ward that he has produced these impressive arrangements with a collection of vintage and modern keyboards, guitar synths and samples.

I immediately sensed more than just a fleeting familiarity with the music from the The Brotherhood Suite and a bit of searching through the memory banks revealed that five of the seven pieces formed the latter part of Gordon’s collaborative album with Rick Wakeman, the delightful From Brush & Stone released in 2009. More digging and I eventually found my copy of the album. Now I believe there are earlier, out of print, live recordings of the The Brotherhood Suite, which would be really nice to hear. Regardless, what Gordon and Paul have achieved here not only builds on those orchestrations from From Brush & Stone, but take the music to a whole new level, no better illustrated than in the opening track with its haunting landscape.

I’m not going to attempt to select highlights from these arrangements, however and for the purposes of this review I might offer one, the stunningly beautiful The Light Of The World with Gordon’s achingly touching guitar enveloped in layers of warm choirs and soft synths. Suffice to say that the first six pieces take us through an enchanting pastoral landscape, capturing the romanticism of Vaughan Williams, Field and Elgar, with lush arrangements that both soothe and absorb. In fact only the concluding tune of the suite, Work, breaks the serene tranquillity with its symphonic prog orchestral percussion, strident string sections, Gordon’s nimbly fluid guitar – all reminiscent of his fine work during the ’70s.

If the album finished here it would certainly be worth the admission fee, however seven tracks still remain and although they take us down a less orchestrated route they compliment what has gone before admirably. The eponymous solo piece, Loren is a moving tribute to the late wife of Bert Jansch, whereas those who have had the pleasure of catching Gordon’s captivating solo performances will delight at the arrangement Sadie In May, dedicated to his daughter.

[embedded content]

The delicate Ania’s Dream is a wonderful marriage of guitar sympathetically underpinned by church organ, whilst the liveliest track is saved to the very end. A Promise Fulfilled sees Fairport’s Ric Sanders adding his distinct violin, who along with Gordon and Paul offer a rousing conclusion to The Last Of England.

So there we have it and not a single mention of any TV holiday programme theme tunes… ;0)

In light of the media coverage which heralded the release of the Ravens & Lullabies project, it’s a shame really that this latest collaborative album hasn’t quite receive the press coverage it so richly deserves – especially as it marks two notable celebrations. The Last Of England, the first release in 2017 from Angel Air Records, marks their 20th anniversary this year and it also acts as a precursor to the celebrations of the professional career for Gordon Giltrap, which will shortly enter it’s fiftieth year.

Gordon Giltrap and Paul Ward have produced something rather special here and a release that ranks very highly in the GG catalogue. The Last Of England is a wonderful testament to Gordon Giltrap and his music…

TRACK LISTING
01. The Last Of England (8:27)
02. All The Days Of May (3:40)
03. Spring (3:01)
04. Elegy (Chatterton) (5:18)
05. April Love (1:45)
06. The Light Of The World (3:07)
07. Work (4:12)
08. Loren (3:00)
09. The Anna Fantasia (5:16)
10. This Father’s Love (3:57)
11. Sadie In May (3:16)
12. Ania’s Dream (4:30)
13. Plas Oriel (2:52)
14. A Promise Fulfilled (3:32)

Total Time – 55:53

MUSICIANS
Gordon Giltrap – Guitars
Paul Ward – Keyboards, Guitar Synths & Orchestrations
~ Guest Musician:
Ric Sanders – Violin (track 14)

ADDITIONAL INFO
Record Label: Angel Air Records
Catalogue#: SJPCD495
Date of Release: 20th January 2017

LINKS
Gordon Giltrap – Website | Facebook

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101 Dimensions January

If you missed last weekend’s 101 Dimensions, you can still listen HERE

“…And then there were three…”
With only three of us doing the rotation on 101 Dimensions, my turns will be coming more often. No worries, though…I’ve got lots of great electronic/ambient music to blow your mind! Like this week’s crop:

1. Jean-Michel Jarre – Oxygene (Pts. IV, V, & VI) (from the album Oxygene, 1976)
2. The Alan Parsons Project – I Robot (from the album I Robot, 1977)
3. Pekka Pohjola – B The Magpie, Side 1 (including The Beginning, The First Morning, Bad Weather, and Bialoipokku’s War Dream) (from the album B The Magpie, 1974)
4. The Alan Parsons Project – Hyper Gamma Spaces (from the album Pyramid, 1978)
5. Boddy, Reuter & Mullaney – Mysterionic (from the album Triptych, 2003)
6. Klaus Schulze – Die Prophezeiung Erfult Sich (from the album Contemporary Works, Vol. II, 2002)
7. The Alan Parsons Project – Lucifer (from the album Eve, 1979)
8. Redshift – A Midnight Clear (from the album Redshift II, 1997)

I hope you enjoy! Until next time, Prog On!

Tony

This news story was originally published here: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/ProgNewsProgarchives/~3/_Q_PsXuCEVE/forum_posts.asp

I don’t think he’s rejoining Spock’s Beard and he’s also not leaving BBT but this is big news nonetheless.

From the Spock’s Beard website:

Spock’s Beard is super excited to announce that the amazing Nick D’Virgilio has agreed to play on our next album!

Nick of course is well known to SB fans as our former drummer/lead singer/all around awesome dude as well for working with artists such as Genesis, Mike Keneally, Peter Gabriel and Big Big Train among many others. Nick was with us when we first started and we are over the moon to have him back with us for this album! We know you’ll be as excited as we are to hear what we will be able to create with him back pounding the skins. We’ve been writing material and plan to start recording in earnest in late May, so stay tuned!